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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 2 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 1 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 8: our northern frontier defences.—Brief description of the fortifications on the frontier, and an analysis of our northern campaigns. (search)
e separate routes to invade Canada by way of Malden; but they failed to reach their destination, and wintered behind the river Portage. The Eastern army was collected at Albany in the early part of the summer and placed under the command of General Dearborn, another old officer of the Revolution. Instead of pushing this force rapidly forward upon the strategic line of Lake Champlain, the general was directed to divide it into three parts, and to send one division against the Niagara frontier, absurd than for a general, with superior forces in the vicinity of an enemy, to act only by detachments at a time when his opponents were daily increasing in number. This useless war of outposts and detachments was continued till July, when General Dearborn was recalled, and General Wilkinson, another old officer of the Revolution, put in his place. It was now determined to make a push for Montreal, with the combined forces of the Northern army. Wilkinson, with 8,000 men, descended the St. La
rew McClary, of Colonel Stark's regiment, was a brave and good man. After the battle of Bunker Hill, he rode to Medford to procure bandages for the wounded. After his return, a shot from a frigate, laying where Cragie's Bridge is, passed through his body. He leaped a few feet from the ground, pitched forward, and fell dead on his face. He was carried to Medford, and interred with the honors of war. He lies about fifty or sixty rods north of the old burying-ground. June 16, 1775.--Colonel Dearborn's troops, from New Hampshire, stopped in Medford through the night, and marched early for Winter Hill on the morning of the 17th. February, 1776.--While the British troops held possession of Boston, an English officer, in disguise, left the town, and came to Medford to see a friend who was dangerously ill; and, although he came under cover of the night, the Americans in Charlestown suspected him, and followed him to Medford. His apprehension and death were almost certain. What to d
. Camion.Landaulet. Car (varieties; see car).Liquid-manure cart. Caravan.Litter. Cariole.Locomotive-chair. Caroche.Log-sled. Carriage.Lorry. Carryall.Lumber-wagon. Cart.Mail coach. Casemate-truck.Manumotor. Chair. BathMortar-wagon. Chaise.Night-cart. Chaise-cart.Noddy. Chariot.Omnibus. Chariotee.Outside-car. Child's carriage.Palanquin. Clarence.Perambulator. Coach.Petroleum-cart. Corf.Phaeton. Coupe.Pilentum. Curricle.Pony-chaise. Cutter.Post-chaise. Dan.Railway-car. Dearborn.Refrigerating-car. Dennet.Revolving-car. Diligence.Road-locomotive. Dog-cart.Rockaway. Drag.Sailing-carriage. Dray.Sedan. Droitska.Sled. Drosky.Sledge. Dummy-car.Sleigh. Dumping-car.Sling-cart. Dumping-cart.Sociable. Dumping-sled.Spring-wagon. Dumping-wagon.Stage. Earth-car.Stanhope. Fiacre.Steam-carriage. Fire-engine.Street-sprinkling car. Float.Stretcher. Fly.Sulky. Tender.Velocipede. Tilbury.Victoria. Tim-whiskey.Vis-a-vis. Tip-sled.Wagon. Tram.Wagonette. Trenc
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
1864, and duty there till June 27. Moved to Knoxville June 27-July 1 and duty there till August, 1865. (One Section detached to guard railroad at Strawberry Plains December 6, 1864, to April 10, 1865.) Ordered to Jackson, Michigan, August 15, and there mustered out August 22, 1865. Battery lost during service 1 Enlisted man killed and 1 Officer and 27 Enlisted men by disease. Total 29. Battery M 1st Michigan Regiment Light Artillery Organized at Detroit, Mount Clemens and Dearborn, and organization completed June 30, 1863. Moved to Indianapolis, Ind., July 9-11; thence to Cincinnati, Ohio, July 13, and return to Indianapolis, Ind., July 17. Duty there till September 18. Moved to Camp Nelson, Ky., September 18-20. Attached to Willcox's Division, Left Wing Forces, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to January, 1864. District of the Clinch, Dept. of the Ohio, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to February, 1
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
4 as private. Cox, John., priv., (G), Jan. 9, ‘65; 23; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Craig, James., priv., (C), May 2, ‘64; 30; absent sick since Feb. 17, ‘65. Crane, Clarence P., priv., (D), July 25, ‘61; 24; re-en. June 21, ‘63; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Crawford, Duncan, priv., (B), Aug. 3, ‘63; 31; sub.; transf. to 20th M. V. Jan. 23, ‘64. Crawley, Peter, priv., (C), Jan. 17, ‘65; 22; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Cressy, David S., corp., (C), July 26, ‘61; 22; died May 22, ‘62, Washington, D. C. Cressy, Dearborn S., priv., (I), Aug, 26, ‘61; 40; disch. disa. Apr. 20, ‘62. Cressy, Romello D., priv., (I), July 26, ‘61; 20; died of wounds Dec. 14, ‘62, Fredericksburg, Va. Croft, Frederick F., priv., (B), July 26, ‘61; 21; wounded June 30, ‘62; 2nd Lieut. July 1, ‘62; dropped Oct. 13, 1862; is reported transf. to Co. I same regt. by promotion to 2nd Lieut., but he is not recognized as having been in service as 2nd Lieut. of said Co. and regt., he having been physica
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The education of the people (1859). (search)
vereigns who still rule Our spirits from their urns. For this sentiment, no one need blush; and often as it has been perverted, much as it has been abused, I believe in it as the mother of much that is beautiful, as a staff to resolution, as an incentive to virtue, as a pulse of that full being which lives in us when we are nearest to God. [Applause.] A few years ago, I was in Chicago, and they showed me, in the very centre of her stately streets, the original log-cabin in which General Dearborn lived, before any other white man, save himself, drew breath upon that spot, now covered by the Queen of the West. It stood in its original, untouched, primeval condition,--the dark-stained, natural wood of the forest. On all sides of it rose the splendid palaces of the young queen of western cities,--the lavish outpouring of the rapidly increasing wealth of the lakes. Roofs that covered depots, hotels, houses of commerce rivalling any to be found in the spacious magnificence of Eur
Pearl Street Cole, Mrs. Dr. H. A.34 Pearl Street Collins, Miss E. M.55 Putnam Street Condit, Sears255 Medford Street Conley, Mrs. Joseph 123 College Avenue Coulter, Mrs. Carrie D.16 Grant Street Courtney, Mr. and Mrs. E. A.199 Washington Street Covell, Mrs. C. F.398 Broadway Cunningham, Miss Lucy168 Broadway Daniels, Mrs. Agnes F.21 Munroe Street Daniels, Harry F.21 Munroe Street Daniels, James21 Munroe Street Day, Mrs. George13 Hamlet Street Day, Miss Abbie L.13 Hamlet Street Dearborn, Miss Anna F.9 Marlboro Street, Boston DeCosta, Miss CoraBean Court Delano, Mrs. Charles 108 Cross Street Delano, Miss Mabel108 Cross Street Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. 36 Sewall Street Dodge, Mrs. H. E.222 Highland Avenue Downing, Miss M. Z.31 Thurston Street Draper, Mr. and Mrs. Frank23 Chester Avenue Dunbar, Mr. and Mrs. E. C.87 Flint Street Dunklee, Mrs. Mary C.23 Hudson Street Dunlap, Mrs. G. H. 19 Mystic Street Earle, Mr. and Mrs. George W.9 Pleasant Avenue Earle, Mr. and Mrs. Sa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Rank, respectively, in the United States and Confederate States armies. (search)
rmy has ever had in its entire existence. Only three men have held that rank in the United States service. Even Washington never held it. The Continental Congress commissioned him General and Commander-in-Chief of the army of the United colonies. He was commissioned Lieutenant-General, July 4, 1798, and never held a higher rank. An act of Congress, March 3, 1799, created the office of General of the armies of the United States, but it was never filled. Knox, St. Clair, Hamilton, Wayne, Dearborn, Brown, Macomb, McClelland, and Halleck held only the rank of Major-General, although each of them commanded the army of the United States. James Wilkinson, who commanded it from 1800 to 1812, was only a Brigadier-General; Josiah Harmer, who was in command from 1784 to 1791, was only a Lieutenant-Colonel and a Brigadier by brevet. The first full general in the history of the United States army was U. S. Grant. He was first given the rank in 1864, and was succeeded by Sherman in 1869, w
sly that a New England army of thirty thousand men should be raised, and established its own proportion at thirteen thousand six hundred. The term of enlistment was fixed for the last day of December. Long before this summons the ferries over the Merrimack were crowded by men from New Hampshire. We go, said they, to the assistance of our brethren. By one o'clock of the twentieth upwards of sixty men of Nottingham assembled at the meeting-house with arms and equipments, under Cilley and Dearborn; before two they were joined by bands from Deerfield, and Epsom; and they set out together for Cambridge. At dusk they reached Haverhill ferry, a distance of twenty-seven miles, having run rather than marched; they halted in Andover only for refreshments, and traversing fiftyfive miles in less than twenty hours, by sunrise of the twenty-first, paraded on Cambridge common. The veteran John Stark, skilled in the ways of the Indian, the English, and his countrymen, able to take his rest on
ey advanced, a party of New Hampshire levies arrived, led on by Colonel John Stark, who, next to Prescott, Chap. Xxxix} 1775. June 17. brought the largest number of men into the field.— When they came to the isthmus, which was raked by cannon, Dearborn, one of his captains who walked by his side, advised a quick step. Dearborn, replied Stark, one fresh man in action is worth ten fatigued ones; and he marched leisurely across Charlestown neck, through the galling fire of cannon shot, which buzDearborn, replied Stark, one fresh man in action is worth ten fatigued ones; and he marched leisurely across Charlestown neck, through the galling fire of cannon shot, which buzzed about them like hail. Of quickest perception, resolute in decision, the rugged trapper was as calm as though he had been hunting in his native woods. At a glance upon the beach along Mystic river, I saw there, he related, the way so plain, that the enemy could not miss it. While some of his men continued the line of defence by still weaving grass between the rails, others, at his bidding, leaped down the bank, and with stones from adjacent walls, on the instant threw up a breastwork to th
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