hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 2 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 2 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 173 results in 79 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
359, 365, 387, 388, 389. Stanhope, Earl of, II. 322, 323, 359, 362, 364. 365, 366, 3S7, 388, 389, 462. Stanhope, Lady, Evelyn, II. 364. Stanley, II. 181. Stanley, Bishop of Norwich, II. 178. Stanley, Hon. Edward (Fourteenth Earl ol Derby), I. 408 note, II. 479; translation of the Iliad, 471. Stanley, Hon. Mr., I. 424. Stanley, Lord (Fifteenth Earl of Derby), II. 362, 3(35, 373, 378. Stanley, Mrs., II. 369. Stapfer, P. A., I. 130. Stebbins, Miss, II. 357. Steinla, MoDerby), II. 362, 3(35, 373, 378. Stanley, Mrs., II. 369. Stapfer, P. A., I. 130. Stebbins, Miss, II. 357. Steinla, Moritz, I. 490. Stephen, James (Sir J.), II. 180 and note. Stephens, John L., II. 201, 202. Stephens, Mr., I. 248. Stephenson, George, II. 149. Sternberg, Baron, Ungern, I. 460, 483. Steuber, II. 6. Stewart, General, I. 381. Stewart, Mrs., Dugald, II. 164. Stilrz, of St. Florian, II. 25, 26, 27. Stirling, William Sir William Stirling Maxwell), II. 271, 322, 323, 363, 364, 365, 368, 309, 378. Stockmar, Baron, II. 179. Stokes, .11. 176. Stolberg, Countess, I. 125. St
Chapter 31: Grant and the Prince of Wales. General Grant arrived in London at the time of the Epsom races, and the Prince of Wales at once offered him a car in his train for the Oaks, the second of the great events of the week; the Derby had already been run. The invitation was accepted, and the General and the Minister and one or two others went down in the Prince's train. A special box had been provided, and after the General's arrival it was proposed that he should be presented to tt within three or four of the Comptroller of the Household, who was at the extreme foot; the Prince and Princess were at the middle with the Emperor and Empress. The Duke of Cambridge, the Duke and Duchess of Manchester, the Earl and Countess of Derby, the Earl of Dudley, were all placed higher than General Grant. When the ladies left the table every one rose, of course, and the Empress and Princess passed out, while Mrs. Grant was left to find her way like any other person of insignificance.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
of the highest rank, to be held in the same manner as hostages for the thirteen prisoners held in New York for trial as pirates. By this course the infamous attempt made by the United States Government to commit judicial murder on prisoners of war was arrested. The attention of the British House of Lords was also attracted to the proclamation of President Lincoln threatening the officers and crews of privateers with the punishment of piracy. It led to a discussion, in which the Earl of Derby said, he apprehended that if one thing was clearer than another, it was that privateering was not piracy, and that no law could make that piracy, as regarded the subjects of one nation, which was not piracy by the law of nations. Consequently, the United States must not be allowed to entertain this doctrine, and to call upon her Majesty's Government not to interfere. The Lord Chancellor said, there was no doubt, that if an Englishman engaged in the service of the Southern States, he violat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate privateersmen. (search)
of the highest rank, to be held in the same manner as hostages for the thirteen prisoners held in New York for trial as pirates. By this course the infamous attempt made by the United States Government to commit judicial murder on prisoners of war was arrested. The attention of the British House of Lords was also attracted to the proclamation of President Lincoln threatening the officers and crews of privateers with the punishment of piracy. It led to a discussion, in which the Earl of Derby said, he apprehended that if one thing was clearer than another, it was that privateering was not piracy, and that no law could make that piracy, as regarded the subjects of one nation, which was not piracy by the law of nations. Consequently, the United States must not be allowed to entertain this doctrine, and to call upon her Majesty's Government not to interfere. The Lord Chancellor said, there was no doubt, that if an Englishman engaged in the service of the Southern States, he violat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
t in writing as soon as possible. But no answer ever came. For nearly a year after the war began, although many prisoners were captured and released on parole, on both sides, the Federal authorities refused to enter into any arrangement for the exchange of prisoners, taking the absurd position that they would not treat with rebels in any way which would recognize them as belligerents. The English government had already recognized us as belligerents as early as May, 1861. As the Earl of Derby tersely said in the House of Lords: The Northern States could not claim the rights of belligerents for themselves, and, on the other hand, deal with other parties, not as belligerents, but as rebels. After awhile the pressure on the Federal authorities by friends of the prisoners was so great that they were induced to agree to a cartel for the exchange of prisoners on the very basis offered by the Confederates in the beginning. These negotiations were commenced on the 14th of February
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 16: visits to Santo Domingo (search)
e expedition. It was a year later than this that Dr. Howe was urged by parties interested to undertake a second visit to Santo Domingo, with the view of furthering the interests of the Samana Bay Company. He had been so much impressed with the beauty of the island that he wished me to share its enchantments with him. We accordingly set sail in a small steamer, the Tybee, in February of the year 1873. Our youngest daughter, Maud, went with us, and our party consisted of Maud's friend, Miss Derby, now Mrs. Samuel Richard Fuller, my husband's three nieces, and Miss Mary C. Paddock, a valued friend. Colonel Fabens, a man much interested in the prospects of the island, also embarked with us. The voyage was a stormy one, the seas being exceeding rough, and the steamer most uneasy in her action. After some weary days and nights, we cast anchor in the harbor of Puerta Plata, and my husband came to the door of my stateroom crying, Come out and see the great glory! I obeyed, and beheld
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Dissenting Academics. (search)
, from whose very brief prefatory notice of the author the preceding particulars have been derived. The sermons shew him to have been an Arian of the same school with Peirce, Chandler, and other liberal divines among the Presbyterians of the earlier part of the last century; and they are productions not unworthy to be ascribed to one whose chief study was that of the Holy Scripts tures of the Old and New Testament; for which he was eminently qualified by a penetrating understanding, critical skill in the learned languages, and a good acquaintance with history and antiquity. Besides Mr. Willets, Messrs. Hawkes and Blyth, of Birmingham, Fownes of Shrews. bury, Turner of Wakefield, Bond of Stand, White of Derby, Harrrison of Lancaster, Moore of Abingdon, and Ward of Yeovil, are known to have been pupils of Dr. Latham. All these, and doubtless many others, adopted antitrinita-rian opinions as the result of the liberal and unfettered system on which their education had been conducted.
icated to me all that he could find on earlier American affairs in the archives at Moscow. My transcripts from the Dutch archives, for which I had formerly much occasion to feel obliged to Mr. W. Groen van Prinsterer, have been largely increased through the intervention of my friend Count de Bylandt. My request to make further researches in the English archives was cheerfully granted, and in the most liberal terms, by the Earl of Granville, and the permission was continued by the Earl of Derby. Indeed, there seemed to prevail in the foreign office a readiness to let every thing be investigated and made known respecting the past policy of Great Britain toward the United States. The American government has manifested the same disposition, and this I hold to be wise. The two great cosmopolitan nations are entering on a new era in their relations to one another; and their statesmen may mutually derive lessons alike from the errors which disturbed the past, and from what was done we
Another diamond wedding. --Our lady readers will be interested at hearing something about the marriage of Lady Emma Charlotte Stanley to the Hon. Willington Patrick Manvers Chetwynd Talbot, which took place at the parish church, Knowesley, on the 11th inst. The bride is the only daughter of the Earl of Derby, ex-Premier of England, and was one of the bridesmaids of the Princess Royal of England. The bridegroom is a brother to the Earl of Shrewsbury. All the girls of the village, dressed in white and pink, formed and avenue near the church, and scattered flowers on the pathway of the bride as she passed along. There were seven bridesmaids, and the bride was attired in white lace, trimmed with Brussels lace, with a veil of the same material and a wreath of orange flowers and blossoms. The dresses of the bridesmaids consisted of white tarletan, trimmed with magenta, and they also wore white opera cloaks and bonnets. After the ceremony, which was performed by a reverend unc
Army and Navy vacancies filled. Washington,Feb. 22.--The Senate has confirmed the following Presidential nominations, among many others: Lieut. Col. Sewall to be Colonel: Major Hoffman to be Lieutenant Colonel: Captains Burford, Whiting, Winders, Sackett and E. K. Smith, to be Majors: Lieutenants Charles S. Stewart, Blunt, Foster, Bryan, Reno, McCarthy, Derby, Hink, and Marshall, to be Captains; Major Emory to be Lieutenant Colonel; Assistant. Surgeon Head to be Surgeon. The following named Assistant Surgeons of the Army were also confirmed: Sporb, of Pennsylvania; Mechum and Wagner, of Maryland; Ramseur, of North Carolina, and Cormick, of Virginia. The following Lieutenants of the Navy were confirmed to fill vacancies occasioned by resignations: Dalton, Bigelow, Bradford, Phitkion, Cook, and Sheyock; Fitch, Harris, Eastman, Wallace, Hackfield, McDougal, Porter, Moseley, Perkins, Blodgett, Phillips, and Lansdale are confirmed as Surgeons, and Samuel J. Jones and Shiveley
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8