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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 37 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 27 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 21 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 15 15 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 6 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 5 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
lacker, swift and swifter, rose high and higher as they pushed forward their angry front. He heard the low rumbling from afar, and, as the storm came nearer, the woods bent forward and shook furiously their thick branches. The lightning zigzagged in flashes. The deep-bassed thunder echoed more loudly, till there was scarcely an interval between its ominous crashing discharges. One half of the eleven thousand five hundred of Howard's corps were Germans, and occupied the exposed flank. Devens's, Steinwehrs's, Schurz's, Schimmelfennig's, and Kryzancerski's troops were rolled over and under by this rapid rolling reconnoissance. Quickly there was a blind panic and great confusion. Sickles, who had moved to the front from his place in line to attack Jackson's marching flank, and to whom Howard had sent re-enforcements to make a grand attack with brilliant results, was near the furnace, and came near being severed from his army. The air was filled with noise and smoke; the mighty c
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on Cold Harbor-an anecdote of the war- battle of Cold Harbor-correspondence with Lee-Retrospective (search)
over which this corps (18th) had to move was the most exposed of any over which charges were made. An open plain intervened between the contending forces at this point, which was exposed both to a direct and a cross fire. Smith, however, finding a ravine running towards his front, sufficiently deep to protect men in it from cross fire, and somewhat from a direct fire, put [James H.] Martindale's division in it, and with [William T. H.] Brooks supporting him on the left and [Charles, Jr.] Devens on the right succeeded in gaining the outer-probably picket --rifle-pits. Warren and Burnside also advanced and gained ground — which brought the whole army on one line. Near Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864, 7 A. M. Major-General Meade, Commanding A P. The moment it becomes certain that an assault cannot succeed, suspend the offensive; but when one does succeed, push it vigorously and if necessary pile in troops at the successful point from wherever they can be taken. I shall go to where you
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
ar to assist, if necessary, sent orders to Colonel Devens to cross from Harrison's Island with five a four-oared boat, to occupy the island after Devens's departure, and to send one company to the Viourier to General Stone for further orders. Devens had been watched by vigilant Confederates. and waiting a favorable opportunity to strike Devens. He had a slight skirmish with the former, insupport could be sent to him. The remainder of Devens's regiment had been brought over by Lieutenantarm to either party. At a little past noon, Devens and his band were assailed by Confederates undto the relief of the assailed troops. Ranking Devens, he had been ordered to Harrison's Island to ttly superior numbers. When Baker found that Devens had been attacked, he decided to reenforce himfornia regiment had already crossed and joined Devens and Lee. A rifled 6-pounder of Bunting's Rhodeoners, and marched off to Leesburg, whilst Colonel Devens escaped on his horse, that swam across the[4 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
an, and Thirty-first Pennsylvania, who were stationed there, and fought desperately under the orders of Generals Couch and Abercrombie. The embankments of the railway there formed a good breastwork for the Nationals. With the assistance of Generals Devens and Naglee, Keyes formed a line at the edge of the woods, composed of the First Long Island and Thirty-sixth New York. In the mean time Heintzelman had pressed forward with re-enforcements, and at a little past, four o'clock Kearney appeaousand each. Among the National officers killed or disabled in this battle were Colonel Bailey and Major Van Valkenburg, of the artillery, and Colonels Riker, Brown, Ripley, and Miller, of the infantry. Among the wounded were Generals Naglee, Devens, Howard, and Wessels, and Colonel Cross, of the Fifth New Hampshire. This was heavy, when it is considered that not more than fifteen thousand men on either side were engaged in the conflict. Casey's division, that so gallantly withstood the fir
Poolesville. Gen. Stone at once ordered Col. Devens, of the 15th Massachusetts, to transfer two. About dark, in obedience to a verbal order, Devens sent Capt. Philbrick, with fifteen or twenty mo be well guarded. This report was sent by Col. Devens to Gen. Stone, who thereupon issued the fol, 1861-10 1/2 P. M. Special order no.--. Col. Devens will land opposite Harrison's Island, with husetts volunteers, will, immediately after Col. Devens's departure, occupy Harrison's Island with he island, under the orders of Col. Lee. Col. Devens will attack the camp of the enemy at daybre pursuit. Having accomplished this duty, Col. Devens will return to his present position, unlessy shot. Chas. P. Stone, Brig.-General. Col. Devens accordingly commenced crossing his force a ry became visible on the road to Leesburg. Col. Devens hereupon, about 8 A. M., fell back to the bar, and portions of the 15th Massachusetts, Col. Devens, and 20th, Col. Lee--in all, 1,900 men. [6 more...]
own's letters, 296; his treatment of old Brown, 289. Ayres, Capt., engaged at Blackburn's Ford, 539. B. Badger, George E., of N. C., wants liberty to take his old mammy to Kansas, 231; 2:32. Baker, Col. Edward D., 422; reinforces Col. Devens at Ball's Bluff, 622; his death, 623; orders from Gen. Stone to, 624. Bagby, Arthur P., of Ala., on Annexation, 174. Bailey, Godard, an account of his defalcations at Washington, 410-11. Baldwin, Roger S., of Conn., 397; 398; 404. De Saussure, W. F., of S. C., resolution of, 346. De Soto, discovers the Mississippi; his death, 53. Detroit, Mich., fugitive-slave arrests at, 216. Detroit Free Press, The, citation from, 392; on the President's call for troops, 457. Devens, Col., at Ball's Bluff, 621. Dickinson, John, of Del., 45. Dickinson, Daniel S., 191; at Charleston, 317. Dickinson, Mr., of Miss., Corn. to Delaware, 350. District of Columbia, 142; 1-43; petitions to abolish Slavery in, 143 to 147;
Commanding desires to express his thanks to the division for the heroic courage and fortitude displayed by them at the battle of Williamsburgh, Va., on the fifth inst. Gen. Peck, with his brigade, consisting of the Sixty-second New-York, Ninety-third Pennsylvania, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Fifty-fifth New-York, and Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania, had the good fortune to be in advance: and arriving on the battle-ground at a critical time, won a reputation greatly to be envied. Gen. Devens, with his brigade, hurried forward. The Second Rhode Island and Seventh Massachusetts were pushed to support Gen. Peck at a trying period of the fight, and were faithful to their trust. The Tenth Massachusetts was sent to the right to support Gen. Hancock, and did good service. The General Commanding deeply regrets the absence at Warwick of the Thirty-sixth New-York. Graham's brigade came up too late to share in the glory of the fight, but not too late to assure the Division-General
, near the forks, and along theNine-mile road. Peck's brigade was on the left, Devens's brigade in the centre, and Abecrombie's on the right, having two regiments anoops on the right of the Williamsburgh road. By the energetic assistance of Gens. Devens and Naglee, Col. Adams, First Long Island, and Capts. Walsh and Quackenbush, and centre as to form a new line in rear. Shortly after this attack, I saw Gen. Devens leave the field wounded; there was then no general officer left in sight belbted to the cordial cooperation of Generals Wesells, Naglee, Palmer, Berry, and Devens, and Colonels Neill, Innes, Hayden, and Major West, Chief of Artillery. It gs and shook them severely. But the inspiring efforts of Keyes, Couch, Peck and Devens, restored their confidence, and they waited the shock firmly. It came soon andforcements. The slaughter on both sides was heavy. On our side the gallant Gen. Devens, who so distinguished himself at the Ball's Bluff blunder, fell desperately
has been ordered to take post on the same road. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, near Centreville, September 1, 1862. To the Officer Commanding the forces around Fairfax Court-House: Gen. Pope directs that you furnish one regiment of infantry as an escort for a wagon-train from Fairfax Court-House to Fairfax station. Lieut. Devens, Ninth infantry, will call for the escort as he proceeds through the town. I am, sir, very respectfully your obedient servant. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, Centreville, September 1, 1862, 11 o'clock A. M. Major-Gen. Halleck: The enemy is deploying his forces on the Little River pike, and preparing to advance by that road on Fairfax Court-House. This movement turns Cent
has been ordered to take post on the same road. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, near Centreville, September 1, 1862. To the Officer Commanding the forces around Fairfax Court-House: Gen. Pope directs that you furnish one regiment of infantry as an escort for a wagon-train from Fairfax Court-House to Fairfax station. Lieut. Devens, Ninth infantry, will call for the escort as he proceeds through the town. I am, sir, very respectfully your obedient servant. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, Centreville, September 1, 1862, 11 o'clock A. M. Major-Gen. Halleck: The enemy is deploying his forces on the Little River pike, and preparing to advance by that road on Fairfax Court-House. This movement turns Cent
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