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Theatre. --Mr. Couldock's rendition of "Richelieu," on Tuesday night, was a master-piece of acting, and we need bestow upon it no higher compliment than this. We are gratified to state that he was very well supported, and the patronage of the public on the occasion was on a liberal scale. To-night Mr. Couldock appears as "Caleb Plummer," in the beautiful drama founded on Dickens' story of the "Cricket on the Hearth." The entertainment will conclude with the farce of an "Alarming Sacrifice," as a preclude to which the orchestra will perform the ever-popular "Dixie."
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], Ordnance Department, Richmond.Va.,may 26, 1861. (search)
hoot Capt. Medlar. Information was received this evening that a coal schooner, which sailed heuce on Friday, and which ran ashore below, was set on fire by a United States vessel. Affairs in Alexandria. Alexandria, June 15. --Mr. Dickens, who has been a prisoner here for some days, having been arrested at his farm house, was released this afternoon, by order of the War Department, it having been ascertained that his arrest was entirely unwarranted, and that the informer was a youth of suspicious character, who has himself been arrested for horse stealing, and other crimes.--Mr. Dickens is a son of the venerable Asbury Dickens, Secretary of the Senate. In order to guard against other errors of this character, a general order has been issued governing the troops in their deportment towards citizens, providing that no arrest be made unless by special order of an officer. Army movements. Arlington, June 15 --P. M.--Many heavy guns and carriages arrived her
Theatre. --The first week of Mr. Jefferson's engagement proved highly successful, and his benefit on Friday night was a rouser. On Saturday night Jefferson played his old character of Paul Pry, and we have to thank him for the hearty laugh we enjoyed. He always introduces some new and irresistibly comic feature to excite the mirth of the audience. The French play of the Courier of Lyons was in the main well performed. One or two of the actors, however, were imperfect in their parts, and made some awkward mistakes, the effect of which was to seriously impair the harmony of a good piece. To-night Jefferson will appear as Newman Noggs, in the excellent play founded on Dickens' Nicholas Nickleby — an attraction sufficient to fill the house to its utmost capacity.
The Daily Dispatch: December 10, 1860., [Electronic resource], The Burning of the Kentucky Lunatic Asylum. (search)
Southern Literary Messenger. The Southern Literary Messenger for December contains many useful, interesting and suggestive articles in prose and verse. It has given us pleasure to bear tribute to the able and spirited manner in which Dr. Bagby conducts this periodical. Aside from the editors contributions, there are thirteen articles, historical, scientific, humorous and pathetic. "Lady Mary Wortley Montague," "Popular Lectures on the Various Forces of Matter," "Thackeray versus Dickens," are the leading prose compositions; and "Tom Johnson's Country Courting; " "The Northman's Cause;" "Death and Burial of De Soto;" "De Profundis;" "Music on the Gulf Shore," and "Lines to Mary," make up a sufficiently varied poetical entertainment. The leading editorial article is a discussion of Disunion, in which the editor advocates immediate secession, and strongly commends the position of South Carolina. The following opening sentence is the key-note of the whole article: "The
Dickens. --The novelist, Dickens, indulges in some petty affectations; a flag waves above his housetop, like the Queen's over Buckingham Palace, as a signal to all interested that the distinguished occupant is at home. Dickens. --The novelist, Dickens, indulges in some petty affectations; a flag waves above his housetop, like the Queen's over Buckingham Palace, as a signal to all interested that the distinguished occupant is at home.
Munificent. --Miss Burdett Coutts, of England, is again enviably conspicuous. Dickens first brought her into notice by dedicating David Copperfield to her; she then added to her fame by introducing into the fashionable circles of London a Liverpool street cripple, who used to go about in a little car, playing on an accordion, and subsequently by offering to back Dickens, Jr., commercially, to any amount. Now the most important drinking fountain yet designed for London is being erected, cating David Copperfield to her; she then added to her fame by introducing into the fashionable circles of London a Liverpool street cripple, who used to go about in a little car, playing on an accordion, and subsequently by offering to back Dickens, Jr., commercially, to any amount. Now the most important drinking fountain yet designed for London is being erected, through the munificence of this lady, in Victoria Park. The cost will be about £5,000; the height 57 feet; the diameter 26 feet.
The Federal Congress. Washington, July 4. --The Senate met to lay, and was organized. Messrs. Powell and Breckinridge, from Kentucky; Polk, of Missouri; Johnson, of Tenn; and Kennedy and Pearce, of Md., were in their seats. The credentials of Messrs. Lane and Pomeroy, and of Dr. Ewing, for the long term, from Kansas; Browning, from Illinois; and McDougal, from California, were presented. Copies of the Navy, estimates were demanded. Mr. Wilson will introduce a bill to-morrow to confirm the acts of President Lincoln. Notice was given of the future introduction of bills to employ volunteers — to enforce the laws — to increase the military establishment — for the better organization of the military — to promote the efficiency and organization of the volunteer forces of the United States and to call the military force of the United States "the National Guard." Mr. Dickens resigned the Secretaryship of the Senate. Adjo
is a side taken in the so learnedly balanced antithesis of Macaulay; so there is in the artistic paradoxes of Ruskin; so there is in the insupportable jargon of Carlyle; so there is above all, in the novel." This is hard hitting, and let us confess, that the nail is often hit on the head. The critic proceeds: "The English novelists, in spite of their great talents give me always the effect of Californian miners in search of a productive vein. They do not obey a vocation, they are in search of a manner and a success. All is fall to arrive at this. We have the fashionable novel, the religious novel, the preaching novel, the blackguard novel, the imitation of starts and that of Smollett, the reformist pretensions of Dickens, the munching Christianity of Kingsley. It is not waim, dousileks, which is to be derived in this ure; one would not like to have it in fewer resources or less variety--one would only like less pre-occupation with effect something more simple and more sound."
eans of retaining their conquest when effected. But they can only hold the South by the creation of a great military caste which, if it were called into existence, would soon hold the North, too, after fashion quite inconsistent with their present institutions. The North, however, have little chance of endangering their freedom and easiness by the creation of such a military caste. Certainly they have not as yet gone the right way to do it. It is plain that the tailors and drapers of New York and Boston are no match for the Texan rangers, and the "brown foresters from the banks of the Mississippi," such as Mr. Dickens encountered on board a steamboat, and whom he remarked to be an object of deference even in those days. Finding matters to stand thus, let us hope that President Lincoln and his advisers will make a virtue of necessity; that the belligerents will sheath their a words and set their newspapers to abuse each other. We know what American journals can do in that field.
"Sober Second Thought." --In our paper of a year ago this week, under the head "Unmarried," appeared the names of a couple who figure to-day under the head of "Married." They were divorced in the Superior Court just one year ago to-day, and, after trying the experiment of celibacy for a year, it seems they have concluded to "join teams" again. This is an instance of "sober second thought" which we so often hear commended, and we trust the illustrious couple will never have occasion to regret their second embarkation on the Matrimonial Ship. We should call this a romance in real life. Wonder if Dickens won't write a story about it, entitled "Once a Year."-- East Haddam (Conn.) Journal.
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