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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
of the reading public more accurately than do catalogues of private libraries, which represent individual preferences. Voltaire had long been known in the colonies. Rousseau's Social Contract was advertised as a Treatise on the social compact, or the principles of political law. He himself is referred to again and again as the ingenious Rousseau, or the celebrated Rousseau. And Emile and La Nouvelle Heloise were evidently in demand. The famous Letters of a Farmer in Pennsylvania by John Dickinson belong to the colonial press in a very special way, since not only did they first appear in The Pennsylvania chronicle, The Pennsylvania journal, and The Pennsylvania gazette almost simultaneously in the winter of 1767-1768, but they were reprinted in nearly every newspaper on the continent, from Nova Scotia to Georgia. See also Book I, Chap. VIII. The Letters were soon known in France, where they were translated by Jacques Barbeu Dubourg, with a preface of glowing compliment. Rep
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
Act controversy. the Stamp Act Congress. John Dickinson. Samuel Adams. the first Continental Contion to the king — were mainly the work of John Dickinson of Pennsylvania, whose notable career as athe Revolution. At the end of the year 1765 Dickinson also published at Philadelphia a pamphlet enetters from a Farmer that is most original. Dickinson wrote as a cultivated, prosperous gentleman,ds had been already somewhat prepared. What Dickinson did, and did with effective skill, was to pro the inhabitants of Canada, both drafted by Dickinson, were also adopted, together with a memorialrote a short preface for a London reprint of Dickinson's Letters from a Farmer. For the next fiv Select Charters, 374-381. the joint work of Dickinson and Jefferson, and one of the greatest of thhad also, as we have seen, collaborated with Dickinson in the preparation of the Declaration of theice in Congress, state, or local community. Dickinson, who had drawn back when independence severe[4 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
are perhaps The song of Braddock's men, and the lines on Wolfe- Thy merits, Wolfe, transcend all human praise. Anti-British ballads began to appear immediately upon the passage of the Stamp Act, to continue until the close of the Revolution. These spring from the heat of the conflict, and are as replete with patriotism as they are deficient in literary merit. Yet they admirably fulfilled their purpose of arousing public spirit, and many of them were known and sung everywhere. John Dickinson's Patriot's appeal, which begins Then join hand in hand, brave Americans all, By uniting we stand, by dividing we fall, gave rise to a parody which was in turn parodied in the famous Massachusetts liberty song. Almost equally popular were John Mason's Liberty's call, Thomas Paine's Liberty Tree, and Timothy Dwight's Columbia, with its refrain Columbia, Columbia, to glory arise, The queen of the world and the child of the skies. But the one ballad that shows a spark of poetry is Nath
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
affairs in Pennsylvania, 106 Dialogue on free will and Providence, 68 Dickens, 207, 279 Dickenson, G. K., 223 Dickinson (or Dickenson), Jonathan, 7 Dickinson (or Dickenson), John, 119, 130-132, 135, 140, 141, 142, 143, 148, 167 DicDickinson (or Dickenson), John, 119, 130-132, 135, 140, 141, 142, 143, 148, 167 Dickinson (or Dickenson), Jonathan (1688-1747), 81, 83 Didactics, 237 Dillen, J. J., 195 Disappointment, the, 217 Discourse concerning unlimited submission and non-resistance to the higher powers, 79 D'Israeli, 243 Dissertation on the cDickinson (or Dickenson), Jonathan (1688-1747), 81, 83 Didactics, 237 Dillen, J. J., 195 Disappointment, the, 217 Discourse concerning unlimited submission and non-resistance to the higher powers, 79 D'Israeli, 243 Dissertation on the canon and the feudal law, a, 129 Dissertation on the nature of virtue, 60 Dithyrambic on wine, 176 Divine comedy, the, 266 Divine Goodness, 79 n., 80 n. Divine weeks, 154 Divinity School address, 334 Dogood papers, 94 n., 233 Doingham, Archdeacon, 213 Wright, Fanny, 190 Writings of Benjamin Franklin, the, 94 n., 97 n., 139 n. Writings of John Dickinson, 130 n., 131 n. Wyandotte, 304 Wyclif, 34 X Xenophon, 93 Y Yankee Chronology, 226 Yankee land, 2
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 2: the secular writers (search)
gnity, nobility, and force. Such were those four documents sent out by the very first Continental Congress: (1) John Jay's Declaration of rights and Grievances; (2) Richard Henry Lee's Memorial to the inhabitants of the British colonies; (3) John Dickinson's Address to the inhabitants of Quebec; (4) Lee and Dickinson's Petition to the King's most excellent Majesty. These are to be classified not as literature, but rather as printed oratory. An opinion of their high quality does not rest on AmDickinson's Petition to the King's most excellent Majesty. These are to be classified not as literature, but rather as printed oratory. An opinion of their high quality does not rest on American judgment alone, but on the verdict given by Lord Chatham in the House of Lords, on Jan. 20, 1775 :-- When your lordships look at the papers transmitted us from America, said Lord Chatham, when you consider their decency, firmness and wisdom, you cannot but respect their cause, and wish to make it your own. For myself, I must declare and avow, that in all my reading and observation — and it has been my favorite study — I have read Thucydides, and have studied and admired the master-
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
under which a litera-The Fist ture was produced which obtained Literary immediate recognition, and in some Centre. instances permanent reputation, here and abroad. From Philadelphia had come, at the end of the colonial period, the remarkably effective work of the conservative John Dickinson, and, somewhat later, the trenchant arguments of the radical Thomas Paine, and the brilliant sallies of the Whig humorist, Francis Hopkinson. The Letters from a farmer in Pennsylvania were written by Dickinson in 1767-1768, and first printed in a Philadelphia newspaper. Later they were published in book form, with an introduction by Franklin, and had an astonishing popularity, not only in America, but in England, Ireland, and France. They were highly praised by such foreign critics as Voltaire and Burke, and their author was idolized at home until, as the Revolution approached, the public grew impatient of his temperate policy. He wished for constitutional liberty; they demanded independence
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 4: the New York period (search)
rary product. It was probably both less refined and less provincial than that of Philadelphia had been during its precedence. In its lighter aspects it may be best judged, like all other social matters, by the testimony of women. The most brilliant belle of the period, Miss Vining of Philadelphia,--who was a correspondent of Lafayette and was so much admired by the French officers that Marie Antoinette invited her, through Mr. Jefferson, to the Tuileries,--complains in a letter to Governor Dickinson in 1783 that Philadelphia has lost all its gaiety with the removal of Congress from the city, but adds, You know, however, that here alone [i. e., in Philadelphia] can be found a truly intellectual and refined society, such as one naturally expects in the capital of a great country. Miss Franks, from whom we have already quoted, speaks in a similar tone: Few ladies here [in New York] know how to entertain company in their own houses, unless they introduce the card-table. Except the
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
se writings. Died in Boston, Feb. 2, 1879. Dickinson, Emily Born in Amherst, Mass., Dec. 10, 1830. A recluse by temperament, she rarely went beyond her father's grounds, and, although she wrote many verses, was with the greatest difficulty persuaded to print three or four poems during her lifetime. Her Poems (1890) and Poems (1892) were edited by M. L. Todd and T. W. Higginson; and Letters of Emily Dickinson (2 vols., 1894) by M. L. Todd. She died at Amherst, May 15, 1886. Dickinson, John Born in Maryland, Nov. 13, 1732. He studied law in Philadelphia and in London and practiced successfully in Philadelphia; was a member of the First Continental Congress and the author of a series of state papers put forth by that body. In 1788, he wrote nine letters signed Fabius, and was the author of Letters from a Pennsylvania farmer to the inhabitants of the British colonies (1767); Essays on the constitutional power of great Britain over the colonies in America (1774). Died in
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
, Gay's, 44. Dennett, John Richard, 106. Denny, Joseph, 65. De Vere, Aubrey, 142. Dial, 132, 168, 173, 178, 179, 262. Dialogue of Alcuin, Brown's, 70, 72. Dickens, Charles, 74, 186, 203. Dickinson, Emily, 126, 130, 131, 264, 281. Dickinson, John, 44, 54. Dismal Swamp, 200, 201. Drake, Joseph Rodman, 104. Drayton, Michael, 8. Drewry's Bluffs, Battle of, 217. Drum Taps, Whitman's, 233. Dunning, Lord, 60. Dwight, Timothy, 38. Edgar Huntly, Brown's, 70. Edinburgh Review, 72. Leather-Stocking tales, Cooper's, 97. Leaves of grass, Whitman's, 221. Lectures on English poets, Hazlitt's, 251. Lee, Richard Henry, 44. Lessons of a Preceptress, Hannah Webster's, 92. Letters from a farmer in Pennsylvania, Dickinson's, 54. Letters from New York, Mrs. Child's, 126. Letters from Silesia, J. Q. Adams's, 66. Lettersfrom under a Bridge, Willis's, 261. Lewis, Estelle Anne, 210. Lewis and Clark, 239. Lexington, Battle of, 41, 59. Library of Ame
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. (search)
way, with her own right hand, to fame and independence. While so many truly great women, of other times and countries, have marred their fair names, and thrown suspicion on their sex by their vices and follies, this noble girl, through all temptations and discouragements, has maintained a purity, dignity, and moral probity of character, that reflect honor on herself, and glory on her whole sex. Anna Elizabeth Dickinson was born in Philadelphia the 28th of October, 1842. Her father, John Dickinson, was a merchant of sound intellect, and moral principle, a clear, concise reasoner, an earnest abolitionist, and took an active part in the anti-slavery discussions of that time. He was a benevolent, trusting man, and through the noblest traits of his character became involved in his business relations, and was reduced to poverty. His misfortunes preyed upon his mind and health; and he died soon after with a disease of the heart, leaving a wife and five children, Anna, the youngest, b
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