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degree of A. M. at Y. C. 1789, and at D. C. 1790; he d. 19 May 1813; Paul, b. 17 Dec. 1743, d. 1754; Silas, b. 17 Mar. 1745-6, m. Susanna Weeks, d. at St. Albans, Vt., at an advanced age; Mercy, b. 8 Oct. 1748, m. Col. Joseph Safford of Bennington, and d. 7 May 1814; Sarah, b. 13 Nov. 1751, m. Benjamin, son of Capt. Stephen Fay, and (2d) Gen. Heman Swift of Cornwall, Conn.; David, b. 4 Nov, 1754, settled in Bennington, m. Sarah, dau. of Capt. Stephen Fay, and (2d) Eunice, dau. of Doct. John Dickinson of Middletown, Conn., and (3d) Nancy, wid. of George Church of Hartford, Conn.; he was in the Bennington Battle, and afterwards Major-general of Militia; he was also United States Marshal for the District of Vermont eight years, and Sheriff of Bennington County twenty-two years; he d. Nov. 1843; Jonathan, b. 24 Aug. 1756, settled in Bennington, m. Mary, dau. of John Fassett, was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, and Senator in Congress; he received the honorary degree of A. M. at D. C.
degree of A. M. at Y. C. 1789, and at D. C. 1790; he d. 19 May 1813; Paul, b. 17 Dec. 1743, d. 1754; Silas, b. 17 Mar. 1745-6, m. Susanna Weeks, d. at St. Albans, Vt., at an advanced age; Mercy, b. 8 Oct. 1748, m. Col. Joseph Safford of Bennington, and d. 7 May 1814; Sarah, b. 13 Nov. 1751, m. Benjamin, son of Capt. Stephen Fay, and (2d) Gen. Heman Swift of Cornwall, Conn.; David, b. 4 Nov, 1754, settled in Bennington, m. Sarah, dau. of Capt. Stephen Fay, and (2d) Eunice, dau. of Doct. John Dickinson of Middletown, Conn., and (3d) Nancy, wid. of George Church of Hartford, Conn.; he was in the Bennington Battle, and afterwards Major-general of Militia; he was also United States Marshal for the District of Vermont eight years, and Sheriff of Bennington County twenty-two years; he d. Nov. 1843; Jonathan, b. 24 Aug. 1756, settled in Bennington, m. Mary, dau. of John Fassett, was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, and Senator in Congress; he received the honorary degree of A. M. at D. C.
tual intervention of private interest in public affairs, Franklin, with the great body of the Quakers, as well as royalists, desired that the province should become a royal government. One man in the assembly, the pure-minded and ingenuous John Dickinson, though ever the opponent of the scandalous selfishness of the proprietaries, chap. X.} 1764. had in May spoken earnestly against the proposal; for he saw that the province must stake on the event liberties that ought to be immortal; and desired to see an olive leaf, at least, brought to them before they should quit their ark. John Dickinson's Speech on the 24 May, 1764. 17. On the other side, Joseph Galloway urged with vigor the just complaints against the proprietaries. All royalist at heart, he had even applauded the ministry of Grenville for its disposition to mild and equitable measures, and was tolerant of a military establishment, The Speech of Joseph Gallo way, 5. 40. of which all the inconveniency to the colonies w
o be signed as they are, by those who are authorized to do so. Journal of W. S. Johnson. Dyer to Johnson, 8 Oct. Ogden insisted, that it was better for each province to petition separately for itself; and Ruggles, the presiding officer of the Congress, heedless of their indignation, still interposed his scruples and timidities. On the morning of the twenty-fifth, the anniversary of the accession of George the Third, the Congress assembled for the last time, and the delegates of six colonies being empowered to do so, namely; all the delegates from Massachusetts, except Ruggles; all from New Jersey, except Ogden; all those of Rhode Island; all of Pennsylvania, excepting Dickinson, who was absent but adhered; all of Delaware; and all of Maryland, with the virtual assent of New Hampshire, Connecticut, New-York, South Carolina, and Georgia, set their hands to the papers, by which the colonies became, as they expressed it, a bundle of sticks, which could neither be bent nor broken.
couraged, wrote Hutchinson; and as he travelled the Circuit, he spread it through the country, that the New-Yorkers were all for peace, that the people of Boston would be left alone. But on the banks of the Delaware the illustrious Farmer, John Dickinson, of Pennsylvania, who had been taught from his infancy to love humanity and liberty, came forth before the Continent as the champion of American rights. He was an enthusiast in Chap XXX.} 1767. Nov. his love for England, and accepted the u or where shall we find another Britain to supply our loss? Torn from the body to which we were united by religion, liberty, laws, affections, relation, language, and commerce, we must bleed at every vein. Farmer's Letters. Letter III. in Dickinson's Works, i. 171. He admitted that Parliament possessed a legal authority to regulate the trade of every part of the empire. Examining all the statutes relating to America from its first settlement, he found every one of them based on that prin
telet to Choiseul, 12 March, 1768. Some still al- Chap. XXXII} 1768. March lowed it a right to restrain colonial trade; but the, advanced opinion among the patriots was, that each provincial Legislature must be perfectly free; that laws were not valid unless sanctioned by the consent of America herself. Without disputing what the past had established, they were resolved to oppose any Minister that should attempt to innovate a single iota in their privileges. Almighty God himself, wrote Dickinson, Farmer's Letters, XII. Works, i. 282. will look down upon your righteous contest with approbation. You will be a band of brothers, strengthened with inconceivable supplies of force and constancy by that sympathetic ardor which animates good men, confederated in a good cause. You are assigned by Divine Providence, in the appointed order of things, the protector of unborn ages, whose fate depends upon your virtue. The people of Boston responded to this appeal. In a solemn Meeting,
hase any imported. These associations were signed by Peyton Randolph, Richard Bland, Archibald Cary, Robert Carter Nicholas, Richard Henry Lee, Washington, Carter Braxton, Henry, Jefferson, Nelson, and all the Burgesses of Virginia there assembled; Burk's History of Virginia, III. 348, 349. and were then sent throughout the country for the signature of every man in the Colony. Compare Washington to Colonel Bassett, Mount Vernon, 18 June, 1769; in Maxwell's Virginia Historical Register, III. 220. The voice of the Old Dominion roused the most temperate Province of Pennsylvania, from its slum- Chap. XL.} 1769. May. bers to express through its merchants their approval of what had been done. Delaware did still better. Her Assembly adopted the Virginia Resolves word for word, John Dickinson to Richard Henry Lee, 22 June, 1769. Life of R. H. Lee, i. 76, 77. Francis Alison to Ezra Stiles, 1 August, 1769. and every Colony South of Virginia in due time followed the example.
ttee of Correspondence of Cambridge, to Committee of Boston; in the handwriting of Thos. Gardner. Original Papers in my possession. The Colonies must assert their liberties whenever Chap. XLIX.} 1773. April. the opportunity offers; wrote Dickinson from Pennsylvania. John Dickinson to Samuel Adams, Fairhill, 10 April, 1773. The opportunity was nearer than he thought; in England Chatham saw plainly, that things were hastening to a crisis at Boston, and looked forward to the issue with vJohn Dickinson to Samuel Adams, Fairhill, 10 April, 1773. The opportunity was nearer than he thought; in England Chatham saw plainly, that things were hastening to a crisis at Boston, and looked forward to the issue with very painful anxiety. Chatham to T. Hollis, 18 April, 1773. It was the King who precipitated the conflict. He had no dread of the interposition of France, for that power, under the Ministry of the day, feared lest the enfranchisement of the Anglo-American Colonies should create a dangerous rival power to itself, Memoire sur L'Angleterre, in Angleterre, Tome 502. and was eager to fortify the good understanding with England by a defensive treaty, or at least by a treaty of commerce. Dispa
his conduct had been questioned; and many in England esteemed him the first politician in the world. Quincy's Quincy, 258. He saw clearly that the rigorous measures of the British administration would the sooner bring to pass the first wish of his heart, the entire separation and independence of the Colonies, which Providence would erect into a mighty empire. S. Adams to A. Lee, April. Indefatigable in seeking for Massachusetts the countenance of her sister Colonies, S. Adams to John Dickinson, 21 April, 1774. he had no anxiety for himself; no doubt of the ultimate triumph of freedom; but as he thought of the calamities that hung over Boston, he raised the prayer, that God would prepare that people for the event, by inspiring them with wisdom and fortitude. The members of the Committee knew how momentous was the revolution which they were accomplishing. We have enlisted, they said, in the cause of our country, and are resolved at all adventures to promote its welfare; shou
Case for consideration. --Six months ago a fellow calling himself Edward Moore was convicted before the Hustings Court and sentenced to six months imprisonment in the city jail, for attempting to pick Col. John Dickinson's pocket on the cars. After the fellow had been in jail several months, a requisition was received from Wm.F. Packer, then acting as the Governor of the State of Pennsylvania, claiming the prisoner, under the name of Edward Livingston, as a fugitive from justice, he having committed a petty larceny in Berks county, in that State. The man's term of imprisonment expires on the 18th. Since he has been in jail the political status of the country has been changed. Virginia is now a foreign country, so far as Pennsylvania is concerned. Whether the man shall be given up or not, in the absence of a treaty on that subject between the custodians of his person, is a matter of discretion with Gov. Letcher. He may or may not be given up. Being under duress he could be
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