hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 27 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last tragedy of the war. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, January 18, 1903.] (search)
The last tragedy of the war. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, January 18, 1903.] Execution of Tom Martin at Cincinnati, by the order of General Hooker. By Captain James Dinkins. During General Hood's campaign into middle Tennessee, in November, 1864, a young cavalryman by the name of Thomas Martin, whose home was in Kentucky, decided to steal away and pay his family a visit. The army passed within fifty miles of his home, and he doubtless thought he would be able to visit his parents and get back before being missed. Soon after his arrival at home, however, the Federals made him a prisoner and charged him with being a guerrilla. He was sent to Cincinnati and confined in a cell. Not long afterwards he was brought before a court-martial and convicted of having been a guerrilla and sentenced to be shot. Tom Martin was a mere boy, and was illiterate, unable to read or write, but he protested his innocence and insisted that he was a regular Confederate soldier. A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
Lest we forget-ben Butler. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, February 1, 1903.] The Scathing Denunciation of his course in war and peace, delivered in Congress by John young Brown. By Captain James Dinkins. Those who have respect for the maxim, de mortuis nil nisi bonum, will have very little to say for Ben Butler. He was in all truth the most ferocious, cruel and vulgar beast that ever figured in human form in this country. But, living or dead, the truth of history must be written of him, and it is not worth our while to soil the mantle of Charity by spreading it over his beastly record. John Young Brown, of Kentucky, told the plain truth of him when he described him in Congress some years ago as brutal in war, pusillanimous in peace, and infamous in politics. His character was as vile as his features were hideous and repulsive. He was unable to understand an honest man's thoughts, or a gentleman's feelings, and he therefore gloried in his villainy and boasted o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
The Confederate ram Albemarle. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, December 28, 1902, January 4, 1903.] Built to clear the Roanoke, Neuse and Pamlico rivers, she accomplished her mission Brilliantly. By Captain James Dinkins. Early in 1863 the Federals had complete possession of all the bays and sounds and rivers along the Virginia and North Carolina coasts. Pamlico Sound afforded a fine rendezvous for vessels of all kinds, while the towns along the Roanoke, Neuse and Pamlico rivers were garrisoned by Federal troops. From these garrisoned towns foraging parties scoured the country and destroyed or carried away every movable thing, including beast and fowl. The people in that section, being robbed of everything they possessed, appealed to the authorities at Richmond for aid and relief. On March 14, 1863, General D. H. Hill sent a brigade of infantry and a battery of smoothbore guns, under General J. J. Pettigrew, in response to the call of the people, with instructi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
30; Defeat, causes of, 368; Surgeons, humanity of, 230; gold in 1865, 119. Colston, General R. E., 111. Constitution. The Federal, 8; Washington, Madison, Hamilton and Jay on the, 9, 10. Cold Harbor Salient, final struggle at, 276. Cole, Major C. H., Desperate exploit of, 259. Cooke, Captain J. W., 208. Cromwellhave a Statue, Shall, 1. Crutchfield, Colonel S., 114. Dana, C. A., 99. Davis, President, Jefferson, to Lincoln, 92; manacled, 100; tribute to, 121,832. Dinkins, Captain, James, 185, 205. Dix, General J. A., 88. Dixon, Captain G. E., 168. Dorsey, Frank, 288; Colonel Gus W., 286. Doughoregan Manor, 220. Drayton, General T. F., 140. Du Bois, A., 279. Dunant, M. Henri, 229. DuPont, Admiral S. F. 139. Early General J. A., 105; meagre force of, in Valley, 109; his movement on Washington, 216, 250. 257, 267; at Lynchburg, 307, 372; his Indian orderly, 871. Elliott Grays, Roll and History of, 161. Elliott, Gilbert, 208. Emack, Lieutenant. 11
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
The battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, Dec. 27, 1903, and Jan. 24, 1904.] By Captain James Dinkins. After the surrender of the Southern forces at Fort Donelson, in February, 1862, the Confederates abandoned Kentucky and mobilized at Corinth, Miss. The troops under General Bragg were also drawn from Pensacola, and such, also, as were at New Orleans. This combined force, at the suggestion of General Beauregard, was reorganized into three army corps. The First, commanded by Major-General Polk, 10,000 strong, was made up of two divisions, under Major B. F. Cheatham and Brigadier-General Clarke, respectively, of two brigades each. The Second, under Major-General Bragg, was arranged in two divisions also, commanded by Brigadier-General Withers and Ruggles, with three brigades each, and numbered about fifteen thousand men. The Third Corps, commanded by Major-General Hardee, was formed of three brigades not in division, and three brigades
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
mended by A. P. Hill, 280. Crenshaw, Captain W. G., 275. Crittenden, General George B. 168. Crook and Kelly, Capture of Generals, 12. Crumpacker, Judge, 90. Crutchfield, Colonel S., 104. Cutshaw, Colonel W. E., 177. Daniel, Major John W., 205. Danville, Va., 80 334. David, Torpedo Boat, 330. Davidson, Captain, Hunter, 827. Davis, President, portrait of in the War Department, 86; last proclamation of, 837; monument, 209; Major Sturgis, 12. Depew, Senator, Chauncey, 97. Dinkins Captain James, 298. Dixon, Lieutenant, his daring, 880. Donelson Surrender of Fort, 298. Douglas, Major H. K., 65. Duncan, Colonel 58. Early, General J. A, 61, 340. Echo, Capture of the Brig, 53. Ellett, Captain, James, 380; Lieut. Robert, 275: Captain Thomas, 275. Englehard, Major J. A., 354. Ewing, Master, 330; General Thos. C., 88. Federal, Vessels destroyed, 53, 330 831; Union a compact, 87; vandalism, 27. First shot of the war, 73. Fisher's Creek, Battle of, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
Griffith-Barksdaie-Humphrey Mississippi Brigade and its campaigns. [from the New Orleans, la, Picayune, mar. 30, Apr. 6, 20, 1902.] By Captain James Dinkins. The seven days battle around Richmond, in 1862, furnishes a text for study and discussion by critics and students of military science, which probably takes rank ahead of any of the operations of the war. We often hear expressions that this or that campaign was Napoleonic, but in my humble judgment there was more genius in the conception of the plan of the seven days battle, than in any movement Napoleon ever made. A writer in the Boston Transcript several years ago, in commenting upon the different generals of the war, stated McClellan was the greatest general developed on either side, and while he was not always successful, he never suffered defeat. This statement will not be sustained by a single man who served in the army of the Potomac during the seven days battle. General McClellan was not only defeated at Ric
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
The battle of Chickamauga. [from the New Orleans, la., Picayune, September 11, 1904.] An address delivered before the United Confederate Veterans' Convention in Baton Rouge, September, 1904. By Captain James Dinkins, Member of the State History Committee. [For the masterly address on the Battle of Chickamauga, delivered before the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, by Colonel Archer Anderson, see Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. IX, p. 385.—Ed.] I desire, in this necessarily imperfect sketch of the great battle of Chickamauga, to record, as far as I may be able, only the most important features and events, and it is not without diffidence that I have consented to do so. The present war between Russia and Japan has been compared to the war between the States, and the Japanese are accredited with possessing equal strategy with Jackson and Forrest. The Japanese soldiers are being spoken of as the greatest of the age, almost without comparison for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ral, 14; its construction, 16, 139. Cummings, Colonel A. C., 97, 174. Daoney, D. D., Rev. Robert L., 3. Dana, C. A., 340. Daniel, Hon. John W., 174, 183, 223. Daves, Major Graham, 275. Davis, Jefferson, trusted by Calhoun, 106; his Rise and Fall of the Confederate States Government, 109; beauty and purity of character of, 294; last escort of, 337; prison life of and fellow prisoners, 338, 371. DeBell, Captain J. B., 144. DeLeon, T. C., 146. DeLeon, Edward, 115. Dinkins, Captain James, 250, 299. Dispatch, Capture of Confederate, 69. Donelson, Surrender of Fort, 126. Dred Scott Decision, 31. Duke, General Basil W., 132. DuBose, John Witherspoon, 102. Early, Everett, 207. Early, General J. A. Vindicated, 224. Early, J. Cabell, 222. Echols, General John, 174. Ellis, Governor John W., 275, 291. Embargo Act of 1807, 17. Engineer Troops, Parole list of, 51. Erlanger & Co., Proposition of, 113. Eustace, Lieutenant, killed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
gates from New Orleans, that I have begged her permission to have it published. Her husband, Captain Eggleston, was an officer in the old Navy, and, like most Southerners, resigned his commission, and entered the Confederate service. Captain and Mrs. Eggleston had their home in New Orleans before the commencement of the war. Without intending to do so, Mrs. Eggleston has paid the highest and best-deserved tribute to our Southern women I have ever read. I hand you the address herewith. James Dinkins. Mrs. Eggleston's address. Daughters of the Confederacy: In the name of the Mothers of the Confederacy, of the Mississippi Division, I greet and welcome you, and thank you for your presence in our midst. It makes me happy to see so many of you here, and the fact that you belong to this organization, proves that you are proud of the noble heritage bequeathed to you by your fathers, and by your mothers as well; for the women of the Confederacy, though secure from the dangers
1 2