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re cut off, so as to be visible at low-water. At hightide vessels drawing from six to seven feet of water can be forced around the edges near the east shore, the bottom being soft mud. Above the mouth of the western branch, was a masked battery for five guns, which, however, had been hidden or removed. Being unable to do anything in this place as long as high-water lasted, I proceeded up the river to Suffolk, and reported my arrival verbally to Gen. Mansfield, and per telegraph to Major-Gen. Dix. At noon as the tide had fallen sufficiently, I returned to the obstruction near the mouth of West Branch, and removed of it as much as possible, till the return of high-water forced me to abandon the work. At five P. M. I returned to Suffolk, and embarked companies K, Capt. J. E. Mulford, and F, Capt. W. A. S. Sanders, of the Third New-York volunteers, all under command of Major Abel Smith; for I wished to make a reconnaissance up the west bank of the river. I left at nine o'cloc
t, A. A. General Doc. 103.-exchange of prisoners. Agreement between Generals Dix and Hill. Haxall's Landing, on James River, Va., July 22, 1862. the ds the performance of field, garrison, police or guard or constabulary duty. John A. Dix, Major-General. D. H. Hill, Major-General Confederate States Army. Suppder that the object of this agreement may neither be defeated nor postponed. John A. Dix, Major-General. D. H. Hill, Major-General C. S. A. Doc. 104.-Gen. Popor service in Department of the Gulf,16 Detached for service in Command of Major-Gen. Dix, (Baltimore,)820 Detached for service in Mountain Department, (Div. Blenkg him to the office of the Police Commissioners, adjoining the headquarters of Gen. Dix, where he remained for a half-hour and was then quietly conducted by two polic, none of whom received any injury from the discharge of the revolver. Major-General Dix sent for Marshal Van Nostrand and asked if his force was sufficient to pr
Doc. 103.-exchange of prisoners. Agreement between Generals Dix and Hill. Haxall's Landing, on James River, Va., July 22, 1862. the undersigned having been commissioned by the authorities they respectively represent, to make arrangements for a general exchange of prisoners of war, have agreed to the following articlequivalent has actually reached the line of his friends. 5. That the parole forbids the performance of field, garrison, police or guard or constabulary duty. John A. Dix, Major-General. D. H. Hill, Major-General Confederate States Army. Supplementary articles. art. 7. All prisoners of war now held on either side, ans, it is mutually agreed that such misunderstanding shall not interrupt the release of prisoners on parole, as herein provided, but shall be made the subject of friendly explanations, in order that the object of this agreement may neither be defeated nor postponed. John A. Dix, Major-General. D. H. Hill, Major-General C. S. A.
very extensive instructions in the theory And practice of their special arm. When the army of the Potomac on the first of April, 1862, embarked for Fort Monroe and the Virginia Peninsula, the field-artillery which had been organized under my direction, was disposed as follows:  Batteries.Guns. Detached for service in Dept. of South-Carolina,212 Detached for service in Dept. of North-Carolina,16 Detached for service in Department of the Gulf,16 Detached for service in Command of Major-Gen. Dix, (Baltimore,)820 Detached for service in Mountain Department, (Div. Blenker,)318 First Corps, (Major-Gen. McDowell,)1268 Fifth Corps, (Major-Gen. Banks,)1259 Defences of Washington, (Brig.-Gen. Wadsworth,)732    40221 Embarked (March 15th to April 1st) for the Peninsula,52299    92520 The operations on the Peninsula by the army of the Potomac commenced, therefore, with a field-artillery force of fifty-two batteries of two hundred and ninety-nine guns. To this must be adde
imore bar, who was in the crowd, was next attacked and dealt several blows about the head. The police, under the direction of Marshal Van Nostrand, succeeded in taking him to the office of the Police Commissioners, adjoining the headquarters of Gen. Dix, where he remained for a half-hour and was then quietly conducted by two policemen to his residence. He thanked the police for their protection. On the way to the headquarters the party were followed by a crowd of five or six hundred men, who sued by an excited crowd, at the foremost of which he discharged several barrels of his revolver. Sergeant Pryor ran to and succeeded in protecting him from the crowd, none of whom received any injury from the discharge of the revolver. Major-General Dix sent for Marshal Van Nostrand and asked if his force was sufficient to preserve the peace of the city, and received an answer in the affirmative. He assured the Marshal that such proceedings should not be tolerated in his Department, and t
ajor-General George B. McGlellan, Commandng Army of the Potomac: General: I have just received from the Adjutant-General's office your letter of July thirtieth, inclosing a letter from General R. E. Lee of July twenty-first. The letters of General Dix and Major Wood will furnish you with the proper information for a reply to General Lee's complaints in regard to the treatment of prisoners at Fort Monroe. The Government of the United States has never authorized any extortion of oaths of all obedience to the order of his Excellency the President of the confederate States, I have the honor to make you the following communication: On the twenty-second of July last a cartel for a general exchange of prisoners was signed by Major-General John A. Dix, on behalf of the United States, and by Major-General D. H. Hill, on the part of this government. By the terms of that cartel it is stipulated that all prisoners of war hereafter taken shall be discharged on parole until exchanged. Sc
nd dying men, have won the love of all; and finally, to the Ladies' Committee, whose untiring labors have been only an illustration of that self-sacrificing devotion to the cause which has so marked and characterized the women of Our country throughout the war, we tender the homage of our gratitude and honor. I cannot close this portion of my report without acknowledging in some feeble manner the opportune aid and counsel at all times so courteously rendered to this association by Major-General John A. Dix, late commanding officer of this Department, in the midst of the multiplied and onerous duties of his position. It is also eminently due to Brigadier-General R. S. Satterlee, Medical Purveyor of the Department, that a proper acknowledgment should be made for his kindly co-operation in assisting us to provide for the necessities of our soldiers; as well as to Colonel W. J. Sloan, Medical Director, whose humane co-operation in all matters appertaining to the interests of our sick an
l McClellan's wounded on parole, and the offer was accepted by General McClellan. Finally, on the 12th of July, General John A. Dix was authorized by Secretary Stanton to negotiate for the exchange, but was cautioned in every possible way to avoiween the United States and Great Britain during the War of 1812 was suggested as a basis. General Lee was informed of General Dix's appointment on July 13th, and the next day announced that he had appointed General D. H. Hill as commissioner on theolumbia, who served in that capacity to the end of the war. Under the supervision of these men and with the aid of General John A. Dix, the prisoners in the East were exchanged. Prisoners in the West were sent to Vicksburg, where the first exchange Where the value of a man was calculated After a cartel of exchange had been agreed upon between the Federal General John A. Dix and General D. H. Hill of the Confederate army, July 22, 1862, Aiken's Landing on the James River was made a point
engaging them to render no aid or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the United States. The Secretary of War will, however, in his discretion except . . . others whose release at the present moment may be deemed incompatible with the public safety. . . . Extraordinary arrests will hereafter be made under the direction of the military authorities alone. In some cases commissions of two, one a soldier the other a civilian, were authorized to hear the cases ex parte and report. General John A. Dix and Edwards Pierrepont examined the John minor Botts and his family—1863 A peaceful scene for Culpeper County, Virginia, whose fair acres were ploughed with shot and shell, and whose soil was reddened with the blood of its sons, during the year 1863. The firm chin and close-set mouth of John Minor Botts stamp him a man of determination. He disbelieved in the right of secession and loudly proclaimed his disbelief until he landed in a Richmond jail. When he was finally convince
dquarters by General Cornwallis during the War of the Revolution was used as a hospital. It was placed in charge of Mrs. John A. Dix, the wife of General Dix, then stationed at Fortress Monroe. Mrs. Dix was an enthusiastic Union woman who left her pGeneral Dix, then stationed at Fortress Monroe. Mrs. Dix was an enthusiastic Union woman who left her palatial home in New York to give her services to the suffering and wounded soldiers. The bricks of which this building was built were brought over from England. The hospital established here under the care of Mrs. Dix is said by old soldiers to haMrs. Dix was an enthusiastic Union woman who left her palatial home in New York to give her services to the suffering and wounded soldiers. The bricks of which this building was built were brought over from England. The hospital established here under the care of Mrs. Dix is said by old soldiers to have been one of the most convenient and pleasant of those established for the Union army in the early years of the war. Fortunately for the inmates it was never overcrowded. Instruments of war and mercy—the gun and the church-hospital in 1862 CMrs. Dix is said by old soldiers to have been one of the most convenient and pleasant of those established for the Union army in the early years of the war. Fortunately for the inmates it was never overcrowded. Instruments of war and mercy—the gun and the church-hospital in 1862 Cornwallis' headquarters a hospital in 1862 to convert the U into a C, leaving the S and A painted on it in some Northern city, still on duty; but these were generally taken possession of by brigade, division, or corps headquarters, leaving the regi
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