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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. (search)
ort by General Wool, replied Mansfield. President Lincoln with vehement action threw his tall hat on the floor, and, uttering strongly his disapproval and disappointment, he said finally: Send me some one who can write. Colonel LeGrand B. Cannon, of Wool's staff, responded, and Lincoln dictated an order to General Wool requiring that troops at Camp Hamilton be at once ordered to Norfolk, and that the troops already there be pushed rapidly forward. The order was issued, and I reported to General Viele at Norfolk and was assigned to the command of the exterior lines of defense at Portsmouth. The delays occurring in forwarding and pushing the troops allowed the Confederates time to burn the Navy Yard at Portsmouth, and to destroy the shipping. These troops remained at Norfolk until about June 1st, when we received orders to report to McClellan at Fair Oaks. General Wool was relieved of his command soon after the affair at Norfolk, and General John A. Dix was appointed in his stead.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
. S. (4 co's), Lieut.-Col. William N. Grier; 6th U. S. (with Stoneman's command), Capt. August V. Kautz. Cavalry Reserve loss: k, 14; xw, 55; in, 85 == 154. [Brig.-Gen's George Stoneman and William H. Emory operated on the right flank of the army with a mixed command of infantry, cavalry, and artillery.] Total loss of the Army of the Potomac: 1734 killed, 8062 wounded, and 6053 captured or missing == 15,849. The present for duty equipped, or effective force of this army (exclusive of Dix's command at and about Fort Monroe), on June 20th, 186(2, was 1511 engineers, 6513 cavalry, 6446 artillery, and 90,975 infantry, in all 105,445. See Official Records, XI., Pt. II., p. 238. The Confederate forces. Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee. Jackson's command, Maj.-Gen. T. J. Jackson. Cavalry: 2d Va., Col. Thomas T. Munford. Whiting's division, Brig.-Gen. William H. C. Whiting. Staff loss: I, 1; w, 1 == 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John B. Hood: 18th Ga.,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
to do. One of the saddest things connected with the miserable fratricidal war was the breaking up of ties of friendship and of blood. The troops opposing mine on that murderous field that day were the regulars of General George Sykes, a Southerner by birth, and my room-mate at West Point,--a man admired by all for his honor, courage, and frankness, and peculiarly endeared to me by his social qualities. During the negotiations of the cartel for the exchange of prisoners, intrusted to General Dix and myself, I sent word to General Sykes, through Colonel N. B. Sweitzer, of General McClellan's staff, that had I known that he was in front of me at Cold Harbor, I would have sent some of my North Carolina boys up to take him out of the cold. He replied through the same source: I appreciate the sarcasm, but our time will be next and the tables will be turned. Alas! it was a true prophecy. About 9 P. M. on the 27th, Major H. B. Clitz was f brought into my room at the McGehee house
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
y of the Potomac which left Harrison's Landing moved out from that place on August 14th, On the 30th of July General Halleck ordered General McClellan to send away his sick as rapidly as possible. On the 3d of August General Halleck telegraphed: It is determined to withdraw your army from the Peninsula to Aquia Creek. You will take immediate measures to effect this. . . Your material and transportation should be removed first. General McClellan protested against the movement, as did Generals Dix, Burnside, and Sumner. Gene ral Halleck replied to General McClellan that he saw no alternative. There is no change of plans. I . . . have taken the responsibility . . . and am to risk my reputation on it. The movement of the sick began at once. Between the 1st of August, when the order was received, and the 16th, when the evacuation of Harrison's Landing was completed, 14,159 were sent away, many of them necessarily to the North. The first troops arrived at Aquia within seven days
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.61 (search)
ing slightly more than made good the losses Fac-Simile of a part of General McClellan's last manuscript. [see P. 546 and foot-note, P. 545.] in battle and by disease. But among these 89,000 for duty. According to General McClellan's Tri-monthly return, dated July 10, 1862 ( Official Records, Vol. XI., Pt. III., p. 312), he would appear to be mistaken, above, in saying that the 89,000 for duty included all the extra duty men, for in the return he classifies (excluding the forces under Dix) 88,435 as present for duty, equipped, at Harrison's Landing, and in the next column he accounts for 106,466 as the aggregate present. Obviously there is no meaning in the return if the 88,435 present for duty, equipped, did not exclude the 18,021 (supposably extra duty men like teamsters, etc.) which made the difference between the present for duty, equipped, and the 106,466 aggregate present.--Editors. on the 10th of July were included all the extra duty men employed as teamsters, and in t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
Yorktown, Gloucester Point, and Williamsburg, under General E. D. Keyes. The troops under Peck belonged to the Seventh Corps. Keyes's command was known as the Fourth Corps. Both were included in the Department of Virginia, commanded by General John A. Dix, with headquarters at Fort Monroe. While Lee was invading the North an expedition was sent by General Dix from White House to the South Anna River and Bottom's Bridge to destroy Lee's communications and threaten Richmond.--editors. in, General Dix from White House to the South Anna River and Bottom's Bridge to destroy Lee's communications and threaten Richmond.--editors. in, the Peninsula might have been utilized, and Hooker's whole army set free for operations against Lee. As yet an invasion of the North had not been definitely fixed upon. On June 8th, the day before the engagement at Brandy Station, Lee, in a confidential letter to Mr. Seddon, Confederate Secretary of War, stated that he was aware of the hazard of taking the aggressive, yet nothing was to be gained by remaining on the defensive; still, if the department thought it better to do so, he would ad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Butler's attack on Drewry's Bluff. (search)
ral Butler in his plan of campaign was tempted by the short line between the rivers, and, taking into account only the ease with which this line could be defended, forgot certain elements of great importance in an offensive campaign. Major-General John A. Dix. From a photograph. General Dix took command at Fort Monroe on June 2, 1862, and was relieved by General John G. Foster, July 18, 1863, and sent to succeed General Wool at New York City, where the draft riots had been in progress. GGeneral Dix took command at Fort Monroe on June 2, 1862, and was relieved by General John G. Foster, July 18, 1863, and sent to succeed General Wool at New York City, where the draft riots had been in progress. General Foster was relieved at Fort Monroe by General Butler, November 11, 1863. The James River will never again present such a scene as that of the 5th of May, 1864. An army of forty thousand men was afloat on its waters, convoyed by various vessels of the navy, then under command of Admiral Lee. It was a motley array of vessels. Coasters and river steamers, ferry-boats and tugs, screw and side-wheel steamers, sloops, schooners, barges, and canal-boats raced or crawled up the stream tow
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
foreign exchange, was so great, and the wants of commission merchants had become so pressing, that the banks of New York City, to give relief, purchased two millions five hundred thousand dollars of foreign exchange, upon which gold might be realized in thirty days. They also resolved upon a liberal line of discounts, by a consolidated fund arrangement with the Clearing-house, and thus they set loose ten millions of dollars, and saved many first-class mercantile houses from failure. General John A. Dix, of New York, soon afterward January 11, 1861. succeeded Cobb as Secretary of the Treasury, and confidence in its management and soundness was restored. The portentous clouds of a commercial panic were dispersing when South Carolinians declared the Union to be dissolved, and there was an equipoise in the mind of the people of the Free-labor States, in view of their financial condition, which made them strong and hopeful. While, as we have observed, all, and especially heavy merch
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
nan's Cabinet went on, and there was a general change in the ministry by the middle of January. When Attorney-General Black succeeded General Cass as Secretary of State, his office was filled by Edwin M. Stanton, afterward Secretary of War under President Lincoln; Philip F. Thomas, of Maryland, had succeeded Cobb as Secretary of the Treasury. Unwilling to assist the Government in enforcing the laws, Thomas resigned, See his Letter of Resignation, January 11, 1861. and was succeeded by John A. Dix, a stanch patriot of New York. Thompson left the Interior Department on the 8th, January, 1861. and, like Floyd, hastened to his own State to assist in the work of rebellion. There was still another cause for excitement in Washington and throughout the country, during the eventful week we are considering. It was the arrival and action of Messrs. Barnwell, Adams, and Orr, the Commissioners for South Carolina. They evidently expected to stay a long time, as embassadors of their Sover
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
letter, 183. Pelican flag blessed, 184. Secretary Dix's order to shoot any one who should attemps for the use of the gathering insurgents. General Dix was then at the head of the Treasury Depart profound sensation throughout the Union. Secretary Dix had sent William Hemphill Jones as specialood, of the McClelland, inclosing one from Secretary Dix, The original is before me. It reads thector Hatch sustained the action of the rebel. Dix instantly telegraphed back, saying:--Tell Lieut was placed in the coffers of the State. John A. Dix. General Dix's order soon went over the lGeneral Dix's order soon went over the land by telegraph and newspapers; and its last sentence thrilled every loyal heart with a hope that nd saved from the flames the flag to which Secretary Dix alluded; also the Confederate flag which hsed in its place. These flags were sent to General Dix by General Butler, who wrote, saying:--Whenuld be at that very critical time, and he The Dix medal. steadily refused. The great mass of the
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