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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Doby or search for Doby in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
om its adversary. The Confederate artillery were ordered to reserve their ammunition entirely for the enemy's infantry, and consequently submitted quietly to the enemy's practice and only fired occasionally when a moving column would come in sight. The sharpshooting was active, however, on both sides, and the Confederates made particularly good use of the upper stories of Marye's house, which gave a view of many little nooks in which the Federal pickets and reserves sought shelter. Lieutenant Doby, of General Kershaw's staff, directed this firing, which was kept up by detachments from the different regiments near. The enemy's artillery frequently fired into the house, but could not dislodge the marksmen. Federal accounts stated that Sykes's Division, which held the opposite front, lost 150 men during the day. During his assaults of the previous day hundreds of the enemy's bravest men had fallen wounded so far in the front and under such a terrible fire that their friends were u