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te army but one division, the Tennessee division, under Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, was present. General Polk being in immediate command of the army until the arrival of General Bragg, General Cheatham was in command of the right wing, Brig.-Gen. Daniel S. Donelson taking temporary command of his division. Cheatham's division was almost exclusively Tennesseeans, the First brigade (Donelson's), temporarily commanded by Col. John H. Savage, comprising the Eighth regiment, Col. W. L. Moore; Fiftdered the advance of his whole command. Wharton charged the left of the enemy with great fury, rushing over stone walls and ravines, and driving the opposing infantry several hundred yards. Wharton was followed by Cheatham, with the brigades of Donelson, Stewart and Maney, who mounted the steep and difficult cliffs of Chaplin river and moved forward without halt. They were met by a storm of shot and shell and heavy masses of infantry, but our brave fellows pushed on, driving the enemy before t
y were running. An order was promptly sent forward to occupy Murfreesboro. General Cheatham's division was yet composed of the brigades commanded by Gens. Daniel S. Donelson, Alex. P. Stewart, George P. Maney and Preston Smith. This division, with that of Maj.-Gen. Jones M. Withers, constituted Polk's corps. The Sixteenthharacter of the country and the formation of the corps that the brigades of Manigault and Loomis should receive orders from General Cheatham, and the brigades of Donelson and Stewart should be under the control of General Withers. The enemy was 300 yards in front of Loomis as he advanced to the attack, which was vigorously madeleman, a soldier and a patriot, his loss was a severe blow to the service. The gallant Lieut.-Col. J. H. Anderson succeeded to the command of the regiment. General Donelson reported the capture of II pieces of artillery and 1,000 prisoners, and the successful holding of the position the brigade had won. The conduct of Donelso
Chapter XI Tennesseeans in Virginia Records of Archer's and Johnson's brigades. when Brig.-Gen. W. W. Loring took command of the Northwestern army, then distributed at various points in West Virginia, in July, 1861, he was joined at Huntersville by Brig.-Gen. Daniel S. Donelson's Tennessee brigade, composed of the Eighth and Sixteenth regiments under Cols. Alfred Fulton and John H. Savage, and by Brig.-Gen. Samuel R. Anderson's Tennessee brigade, composed of the First, Col. George Maney; the Seventh, Col. Robert Hatton, and the Fourteenth, Col. W. A. Forbes. Early in August, Gen. R. E. Lee assumed command of the forces in West Virginia, and Brig.--Gen. W. S. Rosecrans became his opponent in command of the Federal forces. In preparing the well-laid scheme to destroy the Federal forces at Cheat Mountain pass, General Lee moved Donelson's and Anderson's brigades to the right and left of the Federal position by circuitous mountain paths, which enabled them to penetrate t
eunion brigade up to his death in 1886, and never failed to attend its meetings. Major-General Daniel S. Donelson Major-General Daniel S. Donelson was born in Tennessee in 1802. He entered the Major-General Daniel S. Donelson was born in Tennessee in 1802. He entered the United States military academy in 1821, and four years later was graduated and promoted to second lieutenant of the Third artillery. He resigned January 22, 1826. From 1827 to 1829 he was brigade maGen. A. E. Jackson, Gen. John Pegram, Gen. Humphrey Marshall, and scattered organizations. General Donelson was promoted to major-general while in command of this department, but soon afterward he diil 24th, General Bragg said: The general commanding announces to the army the death of Brig.-Gen. D. S. Donelson. He died in the department of East Tennessee, which he had commanded. The regret wite brigade, made a similar mistake and was likewise fired upon, but escaped unharmed, though Captain Donelson, acting assistant adjutant-general, who was riding by his side, was killed. By order of Co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
n June, 1826, and was assigned to the Second Infantry, with the rank of brevet Second Lieutenant, to take date from July 1, 1826, and furloughed until November 1. He had as his companions and friends at the Academy such men as Leonidas Polk, of Tennessee, subsequently Bishop of Louisiana and a LieutenantGen-eral in the Confederate service, who was his room-mate and intimate friend. Robert Anderson, afterward famous for his defense of Fort Sumter; William Bickley, his fellow-townsman; Daniel S. Donelson, of Tennessee, a distinguished Brigadier-General in the Confederate army; Berrien, of Georgia; the veteran Maynadier Bradford, a grandson of the first printer in Kentucky; Lucien Bibb, son of the Hon. George M. Bibb, and Mr. Jefferson Davis. Speaking of this brilliant coterie of young men, who became his fast friends for life, his biographer remarks: It was a society of young, ardent, and generous spirits, in which prevailed general good feeling and little bitterness—a generation of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
n June, 1826, and was assigned to the Second Infantry, with the rank of brevet Second Lieutenant, to take date from July 1, 1826, and furloughed until November 1. He had as his companions and friends at the Academy such men as Leonidas Polk, of Tennessee, subsequently Bishop of Louisiana and a LieutenantGen-eral in the Confederate service, who was his room-mate and intimate friend. Robert Anderson, afterward famous for his defense of Fort Sumter; William Bickley, his fellow-townsman; Daniel S. Donelson, of Tennessee, a distinguished Brigadier-General in the Confederate army; Berrien, of Georgia; the veteran Maynadier Bradford, a grandson of the first printer in Kentucky; Lucien Bibb, son of the Hon. George M. Bibb, and Mr. Jefferson Davis. Speaking of this brilliant coterie of young men, who became his fast friends for life, his biographer remarks: It was a society of young, ardent, and generous spirits, in which prevailed general good feeling and little bitterness—a generation of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
nia (regulars), 1861-‘62. Died in 1863. 1822. Walter Gwynn. 293. Born Virginia. Appointed Virginia. 8. Brigadier-General, April 21, 1861. Commanding Virginia forces at Norfolk, Va., April-May, 1861; afterwards colonel (temporary rank) of engineers in charge of defences of Eastern North Carolina, 1862. Isaac R. Trimble. 302. Born Pennsylvania. Appointed Kentucky. 17. Major-General, April 23, 1863. Commanding division in Ewell's Corps (2d) A. N. V. 1825. Daniel S. Donelson. 396. Born Tennessee. Appointed Tennessee. 5. Major-General, January 17, 1863; (1st) adjutant-general of State of Tennessee in 1861; (2d) commanding division in Army of Mississippi, 1863. Benjamin Huger. 399. Born South Carolina. Appointed South Carolina. 8. Major-General, October 7, 1861; (1st) commanding Department of Southern Virginia and North Carolina; headquarters at Norfolk, Va., in 1861; (2d) commanding division in Army of Northern Virginia in 1862; (3d) ap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
army? McCook faces Jackson on the extreme left, a sheet of water in Chaplain's creek, a few hundred yards to his front, plainly visible. They await the onset and do not have to wait long. Wharton, with the Eighth and Fifty-first Tennessee of Donelson, added to his cavalry, makes a flank movement, strikes the Federal left with force. Colonel John H. Savage, with the Sixteenth Tennessee, the Fifteenth closely following him on his left, climbs the heights, strikes the Thirty-third and Second Oerrill and Webster and Jackson successively fall, and the division is irretrievably driven back. Starkweather moves to the assistance of the broken columns, but under the driving blows of Maney and Stewart, following the movement of Wharton and Donelson, is forced to retire, taking with him a part of Bush's Battery and Stone's four pieces, and takes a position on the crest of the hill and grove to the right in the rear of the cornfield, awaiting the final attack. Rousseau is pressed back, th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
Clark, M. L., 44. Cocke P. St. George, 35. Cole. R. G.. 62. Collins, C. R., 74. Cone. A. F 71. Cooper, J. .. 37; S., 40. Corley, J. L.. 62. Cosby. G. B., 64. Crittenden. G. B., 35. Culberson J., 60. Cumming, A., 60. Cunningham, A. S., 70; G. A., 71. Dancy, F. L., 42. Daniel. J., 63. Davidson, H. B., 65. Davis J., 43; J. L., 36; M. L., 64. Derrick, C., 76. DeRussy, L. G., 40. Deveuve. H., 64. Deshler. J., 67. Dimmock, C., 41. Dixon, J., 72. Donelson, D. S., 41. Drayton, T. F., 43. Dubose, B. E., 37. Duncan, J. K., 58. Early, J. A.. 39. Echols, W. H., 72. Elzey, A., 40. Ewell, B. S., 35; R. S., 47. Evans, N. G., 58. Fain, R. G., 35. Ferguson, S. W., 71. Field, C. W. 59. Fish, O. H.. 71. Flewellen, J. P., 61. Forney, J. H., 64. Frazier, J. W., 60 Fremont, S. L.. 48. French, S. G., 52. Frost, D. M., 53. Fuller, C. A., 37. Gaillard, P. C., 37. Gardner, F.. 53; W. M., 56. Garnett, R. B., 49; R. S., 49. Gatlin, R.
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1862., [Electronic resource], List of the General officers in the armies of the Confederate States. (search)
loyd, Virginia, Commanding Army Kanawha. 3.Henry A. Wise, Virginia, waiting orders. 4.Ben McCulloch, Texas, Missouri. 5.*Henry R Jackson, Georgia, resigned. 6.*Robert S. Garnett, Virginia, Killed in action. 7.*William H. T. Walker, Georgia, resigned. 8.*Barnard E. Bee, South Carolina, Killed in action. 9.Alexander R. Lywton, Georgia, Commanding Coast of Georgia. 10.*Gideon J. Pillow, Tennessee, Kentucky. 11.Samuel R. Anderson, Tennessee, Kentucky. 12.Daniel S. Donelson, Tennessee, Coast of South Carolina. 13.David R. Jones South Carolina, Army of Potomac. 14.Jones M. Withers Alabama, Commanding Coast of Alabama. 15.John C. Pemberton, Virginia, Coast of South Carolina. 16.Richard S. Ewell, Virginia, Army of Potomac. 17.John H Winder, Maryland, Richmond. 18.Jubsl A. Early, Virginia, Army of Potomac. 19.Thomas B. Flournoy, Arkansas, died in Arkansas. 20.Samuel Jones, Virginia, Army of Potomac. 21.Arnold Elzey, Maryland, Ar
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