Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fred Douglas or search for Fred Douglas in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
ide, * * * and almost constantly criticised him boldly and often bitterly. Greeley * * * labored [page 296] most faithfully to accomplish Lincoln's overthrow in his great struggle for re-election in 1864. See also pages 282 to 292, et seq. See Morse's Lincoln, Vol. I, page 193. None will deny that Greeley ardently hated slavery and loved the Union, and was unsurpassed for purity and patriotism. Dr. J. G. Holland's Life of Lincoln (page 469, et seq.), shows Fremont, Wendell Phillips, Fred Douglas and Greeley as leaders in the very nearly successful effort to defeat Lincoln's second election. The call for the convention for that purpose, held in Cleveland, May 31, 1864, said that the public liberty was in danger; that its object was to arouse the people and bring them to realize that, while we are saturating Southern soil with the best blood of the country in the name of liberty, we have really parted with it at home. McClure's Lincoln, etc., conceding the hostile attitude towa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
ide, * * * and almost constantly criticised him boldly and often bitterly. Greeley * * * labored [page 296] most faithfully to accomplish Lincoln's overthrow in his great struggle for re-election in 1864. See also pages 282 to 292, et seq. See Morse's Lincoln, Vol. I, page 193. None will deny that Greeley ardently hated slavery and loved the Union, and was unsurpassed for purity and patriotism. Dr. J. G. Holland's Life of Lincoln (page 469, et seq.), shows Fremont, Wendell Phillips, Fred Douglas and Greeley as leaders in the very nearly successful effort to defeat Lincoln's second election. The call for the convention for that purpose, held in Cleveland, May 31, 1864, said that the public liberty was in danger; that its object was to arouse the people and bring them to realize that, while we are saturating Southern soil with the best blood of the country in the name of liberty, we have really parted with it at home. McClure's Lincoln, etc., conceding the hostile attitude towa