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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 1 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 8: local fiction (search)
s an element of higher breeding and more refined living. Her people will be more influenced by sentiment, perhaps sometimes too much so. Miss Wilkins's people will be wonders of keen delineation, but their life will be grim-sometimes too grim. Undoubtedly the whole life of New England seems to all English readers much more stern and sombre than it is, because of her delineations; just as all Americans form a highly exaggerated impression of the good looks of the English people because of Du Maurier's pictures in Punch. The latest New England story-teller, Miss Alice Brown, is in a fair way to rank as the best of the three, because the widest, mellowest, and most genial. Her tales smack of the soil in the last degree, and yet leave an impression of wholesome enjoyment of life. In fact, one of her favorite adverbs is happily --Miss Lucinda went happily along. Probably all these authors have had the curious experience, common to all realistic artists, of first creating their types
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
makes all the more bewildering the sudden eclipse in which this period ends. The observer who reaches this point in Lincoln's career, having pondered upon his previous hesitation, naturally watches the year 1860 with curious eyes, wondering whether 1841 and 1849 will be repeated, whether the man of many minds will waver, turn into himself, become painfully analytical, morbidly fearful, on the verge of a possible nomination for the Presidency. But the doubtfulness of the mystics—who, like Du Maurier's artists, live so many lives besides their own, and die so many deaths before they die—is not the same thing as the timidity of the man afraid of his fate. Hamlet was not a coward. The impression which Lincoln had recently made upon the country was a true impression—that he was a strong man. However, not his policies, not his course of action, had won for Lincoln his commanding position in his party in 1860, but his way of saying things. In every revolution, there is a moment when the<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Dream life, 110, 111, 112, 113 Dred; a tale of the great dismal Swamp, 71 Dreiser, Theodore, 298 Drescher, Martin, 581, 583 Dresel, J., 581 Dresser, Horatio, 240 n. Drew, Mrs., John, 270 Drisler, Henry, 461 Driver, Professor, 207 Drowsy Sleeper, the, 511 Drummond, Judge, 151 Drum-Taps, 269 Du Barry, 281 Du Bellay, 458 Ducange, 461 Du Chaillu, Paul B., 163 Ducs de Bourgogne, 598 Duden, 578 Dugue, Oscar, 592, 596 Duhring, 436 Dumas, 269 Du Maurier, 379 Dunbar, C. F., 440 Dunciad, 487 Dunlap, 270, 272, 487 Dunne, F. P., 26, 29-30, 289, 290 Dunscombe, 438 DuPonceau, Peter Stephen, 448, 451 Durant, 526 D'Urville, 135 Dutch and Quaker colonies, the, 193 Dutton, C. E., 159 Duvallon, Berquin, 591 Dwight, Timothy, 86, 432, 461, 471, 498, 499, 542 Dye, Mrs., Emery, 140 Dying cowboy, the, 510, 514 Dykes, 500 Earl of Pawtucket, the, 283 Early English pronunciation, 462 Early history of the Sat
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
ever with geniality and kindness. Mr. Stillman was then the Roman correspondent of the London Times, a position only second in importance to that of the British Ambassador. His tall, lean figure, stooping shoulders,--where a pet squirrel often perched,--his long grey beard and keen eyes were familiar to the Romans of that day. His house was a meeting-place for artists and litterati. Mrs. Stillman our mother had formerly known as the beautiful Marie Spartali, the friend of Rossetti and Du Maurier, the idol of literary and artistic London. A warm friendship grew up between them. Together they frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treasures of ancient lace and peasant jewels. I bought this by the Muse Stillman's advice : this explanation guaranteed the wisdom of purchasing the small rose diamond ring set in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Student life at Radcliffe. (search)
come together. The French Club, the German Club, the English Club, the History Club, the Glee Club, the Music Club, the Classical Club, the Graduate Club, have their meetings. Had my readers been with me on some Tuesday afternoon last winter they might have found the English Club, whose members care especially for the study of English and have been able to do successful work, gathered in the drawing-room for a pleasant hour. They might have heard one of the members reading a paper on Du Maurier. One spring day they might have found Dean Briggs reading to an eager company from the works of John Donne. Best of all, had they had the good fortune, on a day now gone, to be the guests of the English Club, they might have seen Oliver Wendell Holmes reading Dorothy Q. On Wednesdays our president or our dean, and oft-times some of the associates of Radcliffe, are at home, and groups of students are made most welcome with friendly greeting and home-like fire. On every other Friday