hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 41 results in 10 document sections:

luable young officers with whom I have ever met. Captains Cowles, McCullough, Mastick, Howards, Ensign, and Davis were marked instances of bravery and efficiency upon the field, and reflected great credit upon themselves and their commands. Capt. Holmes, on account of a wound received in the battle of Fort Donelson, was unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twombley, of company F, were wounded, Sergt. James Ferry took charge of the company and displayed marked efficiency and courage. Likewise after the fall of Lieuts. Huntington and Suiter, of company B, Sergt. Lewis (acting Lieutenant) took charge of the company and rendered most satisfactory service. Too much credit cannot be bestowed upon our excellent First Assistant Surgeon Elliott Pyle, then in charge of the medical departmen
luable young officers with whom I have ever met. Captains Cowles, McCullough, Mastick, Howards, Ensign, and Davis were marked instances of bravery and efficiency upon the field, and reflected great credit upon themselves and their commands. Capt. Holmes, on account of a wound received in the battle of Fort Donelson, was unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twombley, of company F, were wounded, Sergt. James Ferry took charge of the company and displayed marked efficiency and courage. Likewise after the fall of Lieuts. Huntington and Suiter, of company B, Sergt. Lewis (acting Lieutenant) took charge of the company and rendered most satisfactory service. Too much credit cannot be bestowed upon our excellent First Assistant Surgeon Elliott Pyle, then in charge of the medical departmen
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. (search)
taken prisoner, he was started, with other prisoners of war, in charge of Colonel Duckworth, for Jackson. At Brownsville they rested over night. The following morning two companies were detailed by Colonel Duckworth to proceed to Jackson with the prisoners. After they had started, and proceeded a very short distance, five soldiers were recalled by Colonel Duckworth, and were conferred with by him; they then rejoined the column, and after proceeding about five miles from Brownsville thee roadside and deliberately shot by the five men who had been recalled by Colonel Duckworth, and his body left unburied upon the ground where he fell. He now lieso by citizens did the guards know that he was Bradford. He was sent by Colonel Duckworth, or taken by him to Brownsville. All of Chalmers' command went from Brance for them to catch up and place Bradford with them, he was ordered by Colonel Duckworth or General Chalmers to be sent south to me at Jackson. I knew nothing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Forrest of operations against W. Sooy Smith in February, 1864. (search)
l Barksdale was also a brave and gallant man, and his loss fell heavily on the regiment he commanded, as it was left now without a field officer. I desire to testify my appreciation of the skill and ability of Colonels McCulloch, Russell and Duckworth, commanding brigades. Colonel McCulloch, although wounded on the evening of the 22d, continued in command; Colonel Russell assumed command of Bell's brigade after the injury to Colonel Barteau, and Colonel Duckworth took command of Forrest's bColonel Duckworth took command of Forrest's brigade after Colonel Forrest fell, on the morning of the 22d ultimo. I have formally congratulated and returned my thanks to the officers and troops of my command for their gallant and meritorious conduct, for their energy, endurance and courage; and it would afford me pleasure to mention individual instances of daring and dash which came under my own observation, but for fear of doing apparent injustice to others who, in other parts of the field, perhaps did as well. My escort deserves e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Chalmers' report of operations of cavalry division on line of Memphis and Charleston R. R., from 5th to 18th October, 1863. (search)
uinn's and Jackson's mill, twelve miles below on the same stream. As soon as I was informed of their position, I determined to attack the command nearest to me before the others could form a junction with it. The Eighteenth Mississippi battalion (Major Alexander H. Chalmers) was ordered to move at midnight, and, crossing Cold Water some distance above Lockard Mills, to get in the rear of the force at that point and attack them at daylight the next morning. The Ninth Tennessee (Lieutenant-Colonel Duckworth) and Third Mississippi State cavalry (Colonel McQuirk) and the rifled gun, under command of Lieutenant Richards, of McLenden's battery, were ordered to attack the enemy in front at the same time. These dispositions were well carried out by the different commanders. The Eighteenth Mississippi battalion, which had succeeded in reaching the enemy's rear, charged gallantly upon them, driving them from their camp and across the creek, but unfortunately a premature shot of our piece
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Forrest's operations against Smith and Grierson. (search)
ers, discipline and drill, I consider it one of the most complete victories that has occurred since the war began. After the enemy succeeded in reaching the hills between Okalona and Pontotoc, the resistance of the enemy was obstinate, compelling me frequently to dismount my advance to drive them from favorable positions defended by the broken condition of the country. About three hundred men of the Second Tennessee cavalry, under Colonel Bartean, and the Seventh Tennessee cavalry, Colonel Duckworth, received the repeated charges of seven regiments of the enemy in open ground; drove them back time after time, finally driving them from the field, capturing three stand of colors, and another piece of their artillery. A great deal of the fighting was almost hand to hand, and the only way I can account for our small loss is, the fact that we kept so close to them that the enemy overshot our men. Owing to the broken down and exhausted condition of men and horses, and being almost out
Barteau, and the Seventh Tennessee, Lieut.-Col. W. F. Taylor, Colonel Duckworth commanding brigade, received the repeated charges of seven Fe, and the command devolved on the gallant Col. R. M. Russell. Colonel Duckworth commanded Forrest's brigade after the fall of Colonel Forrestthe 9th of March, 1864, by an order to the Seventh Tennessee, Colonel Duckworth, and to McDonald's battalion, Colonel Crews, to prepare ratiorong. The Second brigade of Chalmers' division, commanded by Colonel Duckworth, composed of the Seventh Tennessee, Lieut.-Col. W. F. Taylor;cDonald's battalion and Faulkner's Kentucky regiment, and ordered Duckworth (in command) to assault and capture Union City. The commander th at Trenton, after some parleying and skirmishing, surrendered to Duckworth, with 475 men and their arms, ammunition and horses. In the skirmanded by Major Tate of Tennessee, and the Seventh Tennessee, Colonel Duckworth, charged the line mounted. At last, said General Sturgis, ov
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Galveston, was a most pleasant one, and we found, on arriving at the latter city, that Captain A. M. Stafford, of the Galveston Artillery, Captain W. K. Hall, of the Washington Guard, Colonel W. L. Moody for the citizens, and their efficient committees had left nothing undone to make our visit there both pleasant and successful. They met us at the depot, escorted us to elegant quarters at the Tremont Hotel, and made every provision for our comfort and pleasure. An elegant lunch at Mr. Duckworth's, a reception at the hotel, and a drive around the beautiful city and along the magnificent Gulf beach, filled up the afternoon most pleasantly and enabled us to appreciate why the people of Galveston are so enthusiastic about their city, and so hopeful of its future progress. At 8 o'clock that night (March 1st) an escort from the two companies, and the committees, accompanied General Lee to the Artillery Hall, where he was again greeted with a large and enthusiastic audience, being
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Galveston, was a most pleasant one, and we found, on arriving at the latter city, that Captain A. M. Stafford, of the Galveston Artillery, Captain W. K. Hall, of the Washington Guard, Colonel W. L. Moody for the citizens, and their efficient committees had left nothing undone to make our visit there both pleasant and successful. They met us at the depot, escorted us to elegant quarters at the Tremont Hotel, and made every provision for our comfort and pleasure. An elegant lunch at Mr. Duckworth's, a reception at the hotel, and a drive around the beautiful city and along the magnificent Gulf beach, filled up the afternoon most pleasantly and enabled us to appreciate why the people of Galveston are so enthusiastic about their city, and so hopeful of its future progress. At 8 o'clock that night (March 1st) an escort from the two companies, and the committees, accompanied General Lee to the Artillery Hall, where he was again greeted with a large and enthusiastic audience, being
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
ut one detachment of less than six hundred men, under Colonel Duckworth. While the main body of the column continues its march northward, Duckworth proceeds, in the night of the 23d-24th, to the vicinity of Union City, carries at daybreak Hawkins't little extent, for the Federals have no artillery. But Duckworth also has none, and his first assault, although vigorouslysoon be relieved. They fight with confidence and ardor. Duckworth has experienced severe losses, and despairs capturing the not stoop so low as to parley with a simple colonel, and Duckworth presents himself as his plenipotentiary. He speaks of th. That suffices him: about eleven o'clock lie returns to Duckworth and signs with him a shameful capitulation, which surrend enemy's cavalry, he promptly returned to his vessels. Duckworth, in fact, was already far away, and was hastening the pacFirst, he wishes to undertake anew the operation in which Duckworth succeeded so well in front of Union City. The firing cea