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edge for accomplishing the object. In 1619 the patent came into the hands of Dudley, who at the age of twenty left Oxford University to take charge of his father'sas fast becoming a monopoly, urged the charcoal-burners to destroy the works of Dudley, which was done. Dudley's patent was granted for thirty-one years, which wouldDudley's patent was granted for thirty-one years, which would bring it to 1650, the time of the Protectorate, when England had a ruler fit to succeed Queen Bess. The celebrated statute of King James, limiting the duration of patents to fourteen years, was passed in 1624. From the circumstance that Dudley petitioned Oliver Cromwell and Council for a renewal of the term, two things are evt from thirty-one to fourteen years had not been enforced or had been revoked. Dudley charges that the extension of his term was refused by the influence of favoriteand on his refusal defeated his application for extension. It is likely that Dudley only received a moderate remuneration for his pains, as no one seems to have ta
applied for a patent for the same, the government continuing desirous of encouraging the development of home resources. Dudley, in 1619, succeeded in producing three tons of iron per week in a small blast-furnace by the use of coke from pit-coal. od, and with whom the production of iron was fast becoming a monopoly, urged the charcoal-burners to destroy the works of Dudley, which was done. Dudley's patent was granted for 31 years, which would bring it to 1650, the time of the Protectorate, wDudley's patent was granted for 31 years, which would bring it to 1650, the time of the Protectorate, when England had a ruler fit to succeed Queen Bess. The celebrated statute of King James, limiting the duration of patents to 14 years, was passed in 1624. Dudley's petition for an extension was refused. Iron of poor quality continued to be made Dudley's petition for an extension was refused. Iron of poor quality continued to be made in districts where wood was scarce, and of good quality from charcoal in places where forests yet remained. The demand for iron continuing to grow, — a natural effect of advancing civilization, — iron was imported from Sweden and Russia in large qua
kersham's short-twist round-thread wire. j, Blake and Libby's lenticular wire-nail. k l, Smith's polygonal metallic peg. m n, Townsend's polygonal wire, before and after twisting. o p, Townsend's wire; thread raised by pressure. q, Dudley's angular wire, with grooved faces. r, mode of making Dudley's wire. s, Proctor's wire, with serrated edges for burring and feed cylinders. t, Beatty's flat perforated wire. u, Bigelow's shoe-wire, circumferential grooves; no thread. Dudley's wire. s, Proctor's wire, with serrated edges for burring and feed cylinders. t, Beatty's flat perforated wire. u, Bigelow's shoe-wire, circumferential grooves; no thread. The general process of manufacturing iron wire on a considerable scale is as follows:— The rods, from 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter, received from the rolling-mills in bundles, are heated and rerolled in grooved rollers, one above the other, so that the rod runs from the first roll to the second, and so on, without reheating. The rollers run with great rapidity, reducing the rod to a coarse wire which is then passed through the successive holes in the draw-plate. The draw-plate (which see)
c Railroad times,—the wagons forming the barriers; the horses and drivers, the prisoners, contrabands, and refugees within the square; the guard properly posted without and around. We believe it was on the third day of the march, and between Mount Jackson and Edenburg, that there were signs of irregular troopers following our trail; they seem to have come up on the west side of a low range of hills some distance to the left of our road as we were moving north. The train had halted, and Gen. Dudley, who had ridden to the ridge, shouted to send up a company of infantry. These soldiers had only to exhibit themselves, to cause a stampede of the bushwhackers. The latter or any of that ilk did not afterwards appear. Late on the evening of the 6th of October, we drew into Winchester and learned upon the following morning that we were to spend the day in the town. We sallied forth on a round of inspection of the place. Entering an old time Virginia warehouse to which some show of tr
d give a better account of what it accomplished than the Official Report of Colonel Dudley: Off. Rep., Vol. 15, p. 89. I immediately ordered Nims' Battery under thbut changed the next day to Materia Ridge where it joined the brigade under Colonel Dudley consisting of 30th Massachusetts, 4th Wisconsin, 21st Indiana, 6th Michigannd Port Hudson with Generals Weitzel and Paine on right, General Grover and Colonel Dudley in center and Generals Auger and T. W. Sherman on the left. The artillery ould not go into action and was ordered into position with the 4th Brigade, Colonel Dudley, in line of battle in the rear. With the aid of the reinforcements the eneett forward during the night. Following this came the 4th Brigade Cavalry, Colonel Dudley in command, and then the 5th Brigade, under Colonel Robinson, in charge of Off. Rec., Vol. 34 p. 451. Two regiments of the 4th Brigade Cavalry, Colonel Dudley, were placed on the flank, deployed in the woods. The Second Illinois Cava
scences of camp life and interesting facts concerning the association since the close of the war. Letters of regret were received from many prominent members of the old battery and from Col. H. E. Paine of the 4th Wisconsin Regiment. Other notable occasions were the reunion at the home of Comrade John G. Dimick, Worcester, where the hospitality of the host and his wife made the meeting especially delightful, and the 25th anniversary in 1890 when nearly fifty of the boys together with Generals Dudley and Kimball and Past Deputy Commander Billings as guests gathered at the call of the bugler to a feast of good things and an evening of fellowship and army stories. In 1888 the Nims' Battery Ladies' Social Club was organized and since that date has held its meetings annually at the time of the battery reunion. Its members are the mothers, wives, and daughters or indeed any relative of the men of the battery and its purpose is not solely social but mutually helpful as well. It aims
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 2: the first colonial literature (search)
the nervous little parson. But no living poet can move his readers to the fascinated horror once felt by the Puritans as they followed Wigglesworth's relentless gaze into the future of the soul's destiny. Historical curiosity may still linger, of course, over other verse-writers of the period. Anne Bradstreet's poems, for instance, are not without grace and womanly sweetness, in spite of their didactic themes and portentous length. But this lady, born in England, the daughter of Governor Dudley and later the wife of Governor Bradstreet, chose to imitate the more fantastic of the moralizing poets of England and France. There is little in her hundreds of pages which seems today the inevitable outcome of her own experience in the New World. For readers who like roughly mischievous satire, of a type initiated in England by Bishop Hall and Donne, there is The simple Cobbler of Agawam written by the roving clergyman Nathaniel Ward. But he lived only a dozen years in Massachusetts
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
n from his high estate! Longfellow's diary, March 9, 1850. Palfrey compared him to Strafford, saying it was well for him that there were no blocks for statesmen now. Dr. Palfrey has perpetuated his permanent judgment in his History of New England, vol. v. .487, where he refers to those great men of New England who, in the three special crises of her history, abased themselves to take the lead in deserting and withstanding her righteous cause. Two of these were the Colonial governors, Dudley and Hutchinson, and the third, not named, was Webster. Theodore Parker traced a parallel between him and Strafford and Arnold. Emerson said of him, in the Cambridge City Hall, Every drop of blood in this man's veins has eves that look downward. Whittier wrote of him as Ichabod,— So fallen! so lost! the light withdrawn Which once he wore! The glory from his gray hairs gone Forevermore. Then, pay the reverence of old days To his dead fame; Walk backward, with averted gaze, And hide
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
erred in assuming that the nations were bound to discriminate against the Confederacy on account of the immorality of its pro-slavery origin and basis. This criticism, so far as it was just, would apply equally well to Sumners treatment of all law, international or municipal, statute or customary, which did not conform to his moral ideas. The Address received wide attention in England. An edition of one thousand copies, printed in this country, was sent by the Union League Club to Mr. Dudley, United States consul at Liverpool, for distribution among members of Parliament. A French translation of the Address abridged appeared in Paris, and was commended in the Siecle by Henri Martin. It met, naturally enough, with intemperate criticism from the London Times and other journals which were supporting the Confederacy. The tone of newspapers which were in sympathy with our country was deprecatory. Such were the Daily News, the Scotsman, and the Guardian and Examiner of Manchester
soldiers. His three brigades included the 30th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Dudley), the 31st (Colonel Gooding), the 2d, 4th and 6th Mass. batteriome effect on the land forces. General Williams was killed and Colonel Dudley of the 30th Mass. (a regular army officer) took his place. It 's 19th Army Corps, p. 180. He continues: Banks was all for putting Dudley over the open ground directly in his front, but before anything coubattle of Cox's plantation, or Bayou La Fourche, July 13, 1863, Colonel Dudley (30th Mass.) was sent out with two sections of the 6th Mass. Baand driven back by the Confederate General Green, and fell back on Dudley, both being forced a mile in retreat, until supported by General Pae latter mounted) and the 2d and 13th batteries, brigaded under Colonel Dudley and assigned to the cavalry division. They lost in all about eg, with Lieuts. Thomas J. Spurr of Worcester and Frank S. Corbin of Dudley. Lieutenant Spurr refused, when mortally wounded, to be carried to
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