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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 5 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
he occasional disadvantages of a broken military chain. The force dispatched to Kelly's ford was composed of Gregg's and Duffie's cavalry, and a small brigade of infantry, perhaps fifteen hundred men, commanded by the gallant General David Russell, irited account of these, and it is confirmed from various other trustworthy sources. Before reaching Brandy Station, Colonel Duffie had turned to his left, hoping to accomplish something in the enemy's rear. Near Stevensburg he encountered a force driven through and beyond Stevensburg in disorder, as Major McClellan himself avows, with all possible candor. Here Colonel Duffie paused, distrusting, no doubt, his isolation from the main body of the Kelly's ford column. General Gregg had advanc him he availed himself of it like the good soldier that he was. It was after his own repulse that he was rejoined by Colonel Duffie, and meantime the enemy were pouring infantry into Brandy Station by railroad from Culpepper Court-House, introducing
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
nse of Lynchburg. General John McCausland, with his cavalry brigade, was ordered to keep in front of Hunter, and delay and harass him as much as possible, a task which he performed with signal ability, skill, and bravery. Hunter having sent General Duffie, with the brigade under his command, into the county of Nelson, east of the Blue Ridge and south of Rockfish Gap, I was ordered in pursuit and to protect Lynchburg, which was almost defenseless, from surprise by this cavalry detachment. The ld enable me to save from destruction the bridges on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, one of the lines of communication between Richmond and Lynchburg essential to the defense of the latter. I accomplished this object, but failed to encounter Duffie, who recrossed the mountains and joined Hunter at Lexington. On his march from Staunton to Lexington, when near Brownsburg, General Hunter ordered a thing to be done, so abhorrent to all our ideas of war between Christian and civilized powers, t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
t to be. On Saturday and Sunday, June 6th and 7th, General Pleasonton assembled his corps about Warrenton Junction and Catlett's Station, rations, forage, and ammunition were issued, and every trooper was put in the best possible condition for a ceremonious visit to our neighbors opposite. On Monday evening, General John Buford, with his two brigades and light batteries, and a small supporting column of infantry, moved to the vicinity of Beverly Ford, and General Gregg, with his own and Colonel Duffie's divisions, and light batteries, moved to Kelly's Ford, six miles below, and here was found another small column of infantry. The strength of these two commands was about nine thousand cavalry. At daylight, on Tuesday, June 9th, General Buford, with his regular and volunteer brigades crossed the Rappahannock at Beverly Ford and surprised the enemy's pickets, driving them back upon their camps and intrenchments, and maintained for hours a most obstinate fight with a force largely su
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of fleet Wood. (search)
e two Lees on our left. But the battle was virtually over before their arrival, and they did not fire a gun. Their presence, however, revealed to General Pleasonton another item of information which he had set out to obtain. While these events were transpiring near Brandy Station, affairs wore a far different complexion near Stevensburg, to which point Colonel M. C. Butler's Second South Carolina, and Colonel W. C. Wickham's Fourth Virginia Cavalry had been sent to oppose the advance of Duffie's Division. On his arrival near Willis Madden's house, Colonel Wickham found Butler already engaged with the enemy. Before dispositions could be made, either to receive or make an attack, a charge of the enemy produced some confusion in a portion of the line of the Second South Carolina, which extended to the Fourth Virginia. The whole regiment became demoralized, and ran from the enemy's charge without firing a gun. They were pursued through the town of Stevensburg, and for some distance
f them cavalry, including Lieut. Decker, of the Harris cavalry, killed; Col. Fitzpatrick, wounded, and a valuable scout, named Britten, badly wounded. Col. Bayard's horse was badly wounded under him. Immediately after making their escape across the Rappahannock bridge, opposite Fredericksburgh, the rebels applied the torch to it, and thus temporarily delayed progress into the town.--(Doc. 143.) In the afternoon, Lieut. Wood, of Gen. King's staff, Lieut. Campbell, Fourth artillery, and Major Duffie, of the Harris light cavalry, crossed the Rappahannock under a flag of truce, and communicated with the municipal authorities of the city. The City Councils had called a meeting immediately after the appearance of the forces, and appointed a committee consisting of the Mayor, Mr. Slaughter, three members from each Board, and three citizens, to confer with Gen. Augur relative to the occupation of Fredericksburgh and the protection of property. The Councils at the same time adopted
l Kilpatrick's cavalry and a party of rebels, who were defeated. The battles of Rappahannock Station and Kelly's Ford, Virginia, were fought this day, resulting in the retreat of the rebels across the Rappahannock River.--(Doc. 10.) General Duffie, in command of the National forces, occupied Lewisburgh, Virginia, this morning; the rebels had passed through in their retreat from General Averill, just previous to his arrival. General Duffie captured the rebel camp, tents, provisions, anpahannock Station and Kelly's Ford, Virginia, were fought this day, resulting in the retreat of the rebels across the Rappahannock River.--(Doc. 10.) General Duffie, in command of the National forces, occupied Lewisburgh, Virginia, this morning; the rebels had passed through in their retreat from General Averill, just previous to his arrival. General Duffie captured the rebel camp, tents, provisions, and one cannon, many prisoners and one hundred head of cattle.--General Kelley's Despatch.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
weak divisions, Buford's, D. McM. Gregg's, and Duffie's, afterward consolidated into two, Stahel's c and Ames to cross at Beverly Ford, and Gregg, Duffie, and Russell at Kelly's Ford. All were to march to Brandy Station, Duffie being thrown out to Stevensburg, seven miles east of Culpeper, to watceantime Gregg had crossed at Kelly's Ford, and Duffie, leading, took a southerly road, by which he missed Robertson's brigade. Learning that Duffie's advance had reached Stevensburg and that Buford d direct for Brandy Station, sending orders to Duffie to follow his movement. Stuart, notified of hcupation of the place, fell back skirmishing. Duffie sent two regiments to their aid, and after a sthe hill several times changed masters; but as Duffie did not make his appearance, Gregg was finallyach of Buford's reserve brigade stopped them. Duffie finally came up and Gregg reported to Pleasontsonton reports an aggregate loss (exclusive of Duffie's, which would not exceed 25) of 907, of whom
valry had not shown its ability to act as an independent body. Pleasanton took about 9,000 sabres to Beverly Ford, one-third of which, however, were not engaged, Duffie's Division having been detached to hold a position elsewhere. The three divisions were commanded by Generals Buford, Duffie and Gregg. A proper compliment of hoDuffie and Gregg. A proper compliment of horse artillery was attached, and two brigades of infantry were also present in support. Casualties at Beverly's Ford, 484 killed and wounded, not including captured or missing. More hard fighting occurred at Aldie and Middleburg (June 17th and 19th), one of the passes of the mountains which screened Lee's advance into Pennsylva Divisions — Merritt's and Wilson's. General Torbert was assigned to the command of the cavalry forces in the Shenandoah, and his two divisions were reinforced by Duffie's and Averell's Cavalry Divisions of the Army of West Virginia. The cavalry fighting in the Shenandoah was a series of brilliant affairs, interspersed with skirm
'd Nov., ‘62 14th New York 2 16 18 3 137 140 158 Arnold's Nineteenth. Aug., ‘63 15th New York 2 35 37 5 126 131 168 Duffie's Cavalry, W. Va May, ‘63 16th New York 1 20 21   120 120 141   Twenty-sec'd July, ‘63 18th New York 1 10 11 2 203 bert's Cavalry, A. P. Sept., ‘63 20th New York   5 5 2 125 127 132     Sept., ‘63 21st New York 3 63 66 1 76 77 143 Duffie's Cavalry, W. Va Jan., ‘64 22d New York 3 20 23 1 183 184 207 Wilson's Cavalry, A. P. Feb., ‘63 23d New York Mixrritt's Cavalry, A. P. Dec., ‘64 26th New York         3 3 3     July, ‘63 1st New York Veteran 4 56 60 1 89 90 150 Duffie's Cavalry, W. Va Aug., ‘63 2d New York Veteran 5 29 34 3 212 215 249 Arnold's Nineteenth. Sept., ‘61 --New York (1 ., ‘63 19th Pennsylvania   15 15 3 106 109 124 Knipe's Cavalry, A. M. Feb., ‘64 20th Pennsylvania 3 22 25 3 97 100 125 Duffie's Cavalry, W. Va Feb., ‘64 21st Pennsylvania 4 80 84 2 114 116 200 Gregg's Cavalry,
and the militia from part of Pocahontas and Green Brier were present. Rebel killed and wounded three hundred, and over one hundred prisoners, seven hundred stand of small arms, three pieces of artillery, and one stand of colors. Our loss was two officers killed and four wounded, twenty-nine men killed, ninety wounded, and one missing. In this battle, as at Rocky Gap, the rebels overshot us. The battle was fought on Friday, November sixth, and on the seventh we expected to unite with General Duffie, and now that the battle was over, we were in hopes that the Kanawha forces would intercept the fugitives at Lewisburgh. Saturday morning was warm and spring-like, and we took up the line of march for Lewisburgh. After our descent from the mountains, we entered the fertile valley of the Green Brier, which expands to a breadth similar to the Shenandoah, and the same kind of geological formation — Saurian limestone. In coming down the mountain, we came across the brass twelve-pound ho
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