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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
etmore and Thomas Kelly; Engineers: Acting-Second Assistant, R. G. Pope; Acting-Third-Assistants, G. R. Marble, W. D. Pancake, J. F. Winters and John Gilbert. Steamer New London. Lieutenant-Commander, Weld N. Allen; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. A. Chadwick; Acting-Master, H. L. Sturgis; Acting-Ensigns, Edward Pendexter and Eugene Biondi; Acting-Master's Mates, Edward Hennessy and Francis Way; Engineers: Acting-Second Assistant, H. P. Powers; Acting-Third-Assistants, Chas. Haskins, John Dunlap and James Creery. Steamer Aroostook. Lieutenant-Commander, Chester Hatfield; Assistant Surgeon, H. W. Birkey; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. L. Pynchon; Acting-Ensigns, J. S. Russ and J. Griffin; Acting-Master's Mates, C. S. Bellows, Wim. Barker and Edw. Culbert; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, J. C. Cree; Third-Assistants, James Entwistle, Samuel Gregg and Nathan Brown. Steamer Sciota. Lieutenant-Commander, George H. Perkins; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. P. Colby; Acting-
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
Arthur--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Joseph E. Stannard; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. E. Mitchell; Acting-Ensign, G. M. Bogart; Acting-Master's Mate, Robert Wood. New London--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Lyman Wells; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Geo. M. Beard; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. A. Chadwick; Acting-Ensigns, J. M. C. Reville, V. W. Jones and H. Z. Howard; Acting-Master's Mate, E. J. Hennessy; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, H. P. Powers; Acting-Third-Assistants, John Dunlap, James Creevy and John Quinn. Fort Gaines--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, John R. Hamilton; Acting-Ensign, S. A. Ryder; Acting-Master's Mates, W. J. Thornton, Bernard Segersteen and Wi. Brown; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, Lucas Golden, Wm. Clark, Henry Moxley and Thomas Smith. Owasco--Fourth-rate. Acting-Masters, Thomas B. Sears and John Utter; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. J. Smith; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Wm. B. Coleman; Acting-Master's Mates, F. C. Duncan and A. L. S
ipSygnetT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellWilliam Appleton & Co.Boston533 3301845BarkP. CookGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerP. CookProvincetown137 331 ShipVersaillesSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorThomas LambBoston550 332 BarkJohn ParkerSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorBramhall & HoweBoston400 333 Sch.Jane HowesSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorG. BowleyProvincetown110 334 BarkZamoraSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorWilliam A. ReaBoston273 335 Sch.Emily HilliardSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJohn DunlapProvincetown101 336 BrigPlanetSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. HilliardBoston142 337 ShipEmperorSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorWilliam HammondMarblehead600 338 Sch.LowellSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorElihu ReedBoston130 339 BrigChicopeeSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. H. PearsonBoston200 340 BarkLaconiaSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. H. PearsonBoston200 341 ShipCorsairJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonWheeler & AdamsBoston325 342 ShipFaneuil HallJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonGeorge Thatc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dunlap, John, 1747-1812 (search)
Dunlap, John, 1747-1812 Printer; born in Strabane, Ireland, in 1747; learned the printing trade from his uncle, who was in business in Philadelphia, and at the age of eighteen began the publication of the Pennsylvania Packet. This was made a daily paper in 1784, and was the first daily issued in the United States. The title was afterwards changed to the North-American and United States gazette. As printer to Congress Mr. Dunlap printed the Declaration of Independence. He died in Phil Printer; born in Strabane, Ireland, in 1747; learned the printing trade from his uncle, who was in business in Philadelphia, and at the age of eighteen began the publication of the Pennsylvania Packet. This was made a daily paper in 1784, and was the first daily issued in the United States. The title was afterwards changed to the North-American and United States gazette. As printer to Congress Mr. Dunlap printed the Declaration of Independence. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1812.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Newspapers. (search)
ld be taken in writing in the great crowd. The dates of the first issuing of newspapers in the original thirteen States are as follows: In Massachusetts, 1704; Pennsylvania, 1719; New York, 1725; Maryland, 1728; South Carolina, 1732 (the first newspaper issued south of the Potomac) ; Rhode Island, 1732; Virginia, 1736; Connecticut, 1755; North Carolina, 1755; New Hampshire, 1756; Delaware, 1761. The first daily newspaper was the Pennsylvania packet, or General Advertiser, published by John Dunlap, in 1784, and afterwards called the Daily Advertiser. The number of newspapers in 1775 was only thirty-four, with a total weekly circulation of 5,000 copies. In 1833 the first of the cheap or penny papers was issued in New York by Benjamin H. Day. It was called the Sun, and immediately acquired an enormous circulation. It was at first less than a foot square. In 1901 the total number of newspapers and periodicals in the United States was 20,879, comprising 2,158 dailies, 49 tri-weekl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Prisons and prison-ships, British (search)
ndt's, and Livingston's sugar-houses contained hundreds of prisoners, whose sufferings for want of fresh air, food, and cleanliness were dreadful. Under Commissaries Loring, Sproat, and others, and particularly under the infamous Provost-Marshal Cunningham, the prisoners in these buildings and the provost jail received the most brutal treatment. Hundreds died and were cast into pits without any funeral ceremonies. The heat of summer was suffocating in the sugar-house prisons. I saw, says Dunlap, in describing the one in Liberty Street, every narrow aperture of those stone walls filled with human heads, face above face, seeking a portion of the external air. For many weeks the deadcart visited this prison (a fair type of the others), into which from eight to twelve corpses were daily flung and piled up. They were then dumped into ditches in the outskirts of the city and covered with earth by their fellow-prisoners, who were detailed for the work. The prison-ships—dismantled old
ut a dozen persons were engaged in the outrage, some of whom were recognized by Mr. Frost. John Dunlap, a teacher educated in Ohio, was in July, 1868, in charge of a colored school at Shelbyville, thong or strap they first flogged Franklin, each man giving him five blows. After that, taking Dunlap to another place, with the same parade, they performed the same operation, badly lacerating his body. After directing him to leave the city the next day, they released him. Dunlap not at once complying with their demand, they served upon him a formal notice, sent in the form of an unstamped leter through the post office, ordering him to leave by July 15th, or he would be burned to death. Dunlap thereupon went to Nashville and remained two months. Then he came back. He was visited again afis return, but was now prepared with a guard. While the Ku-Klux were hallooing that they wanted Dunlap and fried meat and were approaching his residence, the guard fired upon them. The band retreate
ubert, I, 364, 372, 413. Dodge, O. M., I, 557-559, 597, 598, 602, 611; II, 4-6, 8, 13, 15, 17-19, 21, 23-26, 32, 567. Dodge, Theodore A., I, 377. Dole, George, I, 371. Doubleday, Abner, I, 263, 283, 290, 292, 333, 337, 350, 407, 409, 413-417, 424, 438. Douglas, M., 1, 293. Douglass, Frederick, II, 317, 321 Dred Scott Case, 11, 278. Drexel, Harjes & Co., 111, 526. Dufferin, Earl and Lady, 11, 509. Duncan, William, II, 75, 76, 83-85, 92, 97, 123, 132, 137-139. Dunlap, John, II, 378, 379. Dunnell, Mark H., I, 143. Duryea, Abram, I, 140. Dwight, Henry Otis, II, 511. Eager, C. F., 586. Early, Jubal, I, 147, 160, 163, 260, 332, 358, 390, 391, 400, 416, 428, 429. Easton, L. C., II, 96, 97. Eaton, A. B., II, 250, 257. Eaton, James D., 11, 474. Eaton, John, II, 179, 215, 225, 232, 251. Edward, Prince of Wales, I, 98, 99. Edwards, L. A., II, 295. Eeles, Cushing, II, 483. Eliot, Thomas D., II, 198-201, 204, 282. Elliot, W. L., I