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and further, there is not any mention of a mill on the north side of the Mystic river in any recorded deed that I have been able to find. The first mill constructed upon the Mystic river was built by Thomas Broughton on land purchased of Henry Dunster on Menotomy's side (south side of river). In the year 1656 Mr. Dunster sold to Thomas Broughton all that parcel of land on which the corn and fulling mills stand, which the said Thomas Broughton built on Menotomie's land and in the river of MMr. Dunster sold to Thomas Broughton all that parcel of land on which the corn and fulling mills stand, which the said Thomas Broughton built on Menotomie's land and in the river of Mistick . . . In the year 1659 Thomas Broughton sold to Edward Collins two water mills on Mistick river now in the possession of Thomas Eames in said Broughton's behalf . . . There were two mills under one roof, a corn and a fulling mill. In the following year (1660) Edward Collins sold to Thomas Brooks and Timothy Wheeler 400 acres of land . . . also one-fourth part of the mill on Mistick river lately in the possession of Thomas Broughton . . . In the year 1666 Edward Collins sold to Caleb
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 17., An old Medford school boy's reminiscences. (search)
o better and came down from Lexington sometimes as far as Sucker hole at the south side of Weir bridge. My little boat often took me the whole length of the Menotomy river, clear up to the Concord turnpike and the outlet of Fresh pond, but the scenery in this region was inferior to that of the upper Mystic. I used to note a large, black old house apparently rising out of the salt marsh west of the Menotomy and south of the Mystic, but I never until lately knew it had been the home of Henry Dunster, the first president of Harvard. In winter our river was of no use to the boys or anybody except the eel-spearers. It never froze smoothly and the current was deep and dangerous. Everywhere on both shores there was a space of a rod or more of floating ice masses and sludge difficult and dangerous to cross. The Middlesex canal in winter was very unlike the river. There was no danger in its currentless four foot water; no unfrozen margin. It always froze smooth and early, so that