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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
the nature of a defile, exposed to a raking fire from the Confederate batteries, and an enfilading one from their sharp-shooters. In several attempts to cross the bridge Burnside was repulsed. Finally, at about one o'clock in the afternoon, the Fifty-first New York and Fifty-first Pennsylvania charged across and drove its defenders to the heights. Gathering strength at the bridge by the crossing of the divisions of Sturgis, Wilcox, and Rodman, and Scammon's brigade, with the batteries of Durell, Clark, Cook, and Simmons, Burnside charged up the hill, and drove the Confederates almost to Sharpsburg, the Ninth New York capturing one of their batteries. Just then A. P. Hill's division, which had been hastening up from Harper's Ferry, came upon the ground, and under a heavy fire of artillery charged upon Burnside's extreme left, and after severe fighting, in which General Rodman was mortally wounded, drove him back almost to the bridge. In that charge General L. O'B. Branch, of North
rved through the war. Brady's   1 1 1 18 19 20   Fourth, A. P. Sept., ‘64 I--Cameron's         2 2 2       Independent Batteries.                     Penn. Light Artillery--                   Sept., ‘61 A-- Served through the war. Schaffer's       1 16 17 17     Aug., ‘61 B-- Served through the war. Muehler's 2 8 10   25 25 35   Fourth, A. C. Nov., ‘61 C-- Served through the war. Thompson's   4 4   11 11 15   First. Sept., ‘61 D-- Served through the war. Durell's 1 2 3   21 21 24   Ninth. Sept., ‘61 E-- Served through the war. Knap's 2 12 14   11 11 25   Twelfth. Dec., ‘61 F-- Served through the war. Hampton's 2 8 10   14 14 24   Twelfth. Aug., ‘62 G--Young's         9 9 9     Oct., ‘62 H--J. I. Nevins's         7 7 7   Twenty-sec'd. Dec., ‘63 I--R. J. Nevins's         3 3 3   Twenty-sec'd. Aug., ‘62 K--Keystone         4 4 4       --
rtillery of the command, except Benjamin's battery, was held in reserve. Shortly after daybreak on the seventeenth, the enemy's batteries opened upon the batteries of our line, and a brisk artillery fight began, in which Benjamin's battery and Durell's battery (the latter sent forward a little to the right of our position, under charge of Capt. Rawalle, by Gen. Sturgis) took an active part, cooperating with batteries of other corps on our right. Two of the enemy's caissons were exploded, andng the bridge and the heights above it by assault. The command was moved forward in columns as it had been formed the previous night, and promptly took position as directed, and the light artillery was advanced to cover the movement; McMullin's, Durell's, Clark's, Muhlenberg's and Cook's batteries being placed on the heights to right and left, and somewhat to the front of Benjamin's battery, to which a section of twenty-pounders from Simmons's battery was also temporarily attached. Wilcox's di
rtillery of the command, except Benjamin's battery, was held in reserve. Shortly after daybreak on the seventeenth, the enemy's batteries opened upon the batteries of our line, and a brisk artillery fight began, in which Benjamin's battery and Durell's battery (the latter sent forward a little to the right of our position, under charge of Capt. Rawalle, by Gen. Sturgis) took an active part, cooperating with batteries of other corps on our right. Two of the enemy's caissons were exploded, andng the bridge and the heights above it by assault. The command was moved forward in columns as it had been formed the previous night, and promptly took position as directed, and the light artillery was advanced to cover the movement; McMullin's, Durell's, Clark's, Muhlenberg's and Cook's batteries being placed on the heights to right and left, and somewhat to the front of Benjamin's battery, to which a section of twenty-pounders from Simmons's battery was also temporarily attached. Wilcox's di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
....April 30, 1872 Conventions of the two wings of the Republican party at Baton Rouge, headed respectively by Packard and Pinchback. The Packard convention nominates William Pitt Kellogg for governor......June 19, 1872 Adjourned meeting of the Pinchback convention nominates P. B. S. Pinchback for governor......Aug. 9, 1872 Fusion of two wings of the Republican party by the State central committee nominates Kellogg for governor and Pinchback for Congressman-at-large......1872 Judge Durell, in December, declares Kellogg elected governor at election held......Nov. 4, 1872 Fusion legislature in the City Hall, New Orleans, impeaches and suspends Governor Warmouth......Dec. 11, 1872 Inauguration of Kellogg as governor, also of John McEnery, nominee of the Democratic reformers and liberals......Jan. 14, 1873 Members of McEnery legislature seized and marched to the guard-house by armed police......M arch 6, 1873 People submit to the Kellogg government at the point of
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 1: Louisiana. (search)
o opposition was expected by those Courts. Judge Durell, the only Federal magistrate in Louisiana, employed by an unscrupulous President; but Judge Durell was trying to get the Senatorship for Nortohis telegram on Wednesday night. Next evening, Durell sent for him to his private lodgings on import close the doors. When Billings had drawn and Durell signed his warrant, Packard left the two lawyeesident Grant, pretends to think that order of Durell lawful, or those proceedings of Packard just. s adopted and the Negro porter went before Judge Durell, not in open court, but in the Judge's lodgejudice of his claims-for five clear days! Judge Durell granted him an order in the terms set down.een compelled to own that the order made by Judge Durell on the application of Antoine was not only ics of Louisiana to the present hour! If Judge Durell had not signed that order, the legislature ace as reigns in Charleston and Raleigh. Judge Durell's order gave the partisans of Kellogg an ad[4 more...]
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 2: reign of anarchy. (search)
Chapter 2: reign of anarchy. On Monday morning, Packard, having the Republican writs in his hand, the Federal soldiers at his back, arrived at the Mechanics' Institute, in which edifice the Assembly was to meet. Caesar C. Antoine, holding Durell's order, stood at the door, pointing out who should enter and who should not enter. None but his friends were passed. Once in the legislative hall, these lost no time in prate, for Durell's order would expire on Wednesday, and many things had toDurell's order would expire on Wednesday, and many things had to be done before the Conservative members took their seats. The first thing was to depose Governor Warmoth and obtain possession of his official lists. But how was the lawful governor to be displaced? A Negro, named Pinchback, known familiarly as Pinch, offered his services to Kellogg-at a price. This Pinch, a bustling fellow, had been a steward on board a steamboat, and afterwards an usher in a gambling den; but, like others of his tribe, he found that politics paid him better than wash
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 11: the Rotunda. (search)
fficial superior, and some of the leading journals are demanding that Grant shall retire from the White House, leaving his powers in Wilson's hands. More than all else, Hamilton Fish declares that if the President sustains Sheridan and justifies Durell and Packard, he will resign his post as Secretary of State. This menace tells. Fish is not only the ablest man in Grant's Cabinet, but one of the ablest men in America. Bristow, Secretary of the Treasury, takes the same line as Fish. Without umour, and everyone begins to chatter and shake hands. Some slip away to spread the news elsewhere. The knots and groups break up, and many seek for details in the messages which still keep pouring in. Play over, says the well-known voice; Durell repudiated, Belknap discredited, Sheridan excused. The President abandons all responsibility. Sheridan is not sustained, and his recommendations are described as unlawful. Yes, the play is over. Sheridan will now have time for his pleasure tr
Sturgis's division, yesterday forenoon, which resulted in the death of Lieut Howard McIlvain, of Durell's battery, and which came very near resulting in the destruction or capture of a portion of the n, and they moved to their destination over the more difficult but less dangerous road. Captain Durell's battery, occupying an exceedingly exposed position, withstood for something like an hour tading, Pennsylvania, and had been in service since the opening of the war, having served with Capt. Durell in the three months volunteers. In September, 1861 the present Durell's battery was sworn iy lamented in this corps, with which he had been connected since the 11th of last August, and Capt. Durell mourns in him his best and most trustworthy officer, which is saying nothing derogatory to thelow are the casualties in the fight of Saturday: Killed.--Junior 1st Lt. Howard McIlvaine, Durell's battery A, 104th Penn. Artillery. Wounded.--Henry Ives, of the same battery, arm badly sh
ker, 309. Second Congressional District--Flanders, 2,184; Bouligny, 136. The Yankee correspondent says: The election of Messrs. Hahn and Flanders has given great satisfaction to the friends of the Union. Both are uncompromising, unconditional Unionists, and were under a cloud during the reign of the Secessionists. Mr. Hahn, I believe, is a German. He must be immensely popular, seeing that he was nominated no further back than last Sunday morning by the Trust Delts. Up to that time Mr. Durell, the nominee of the Union Committee, was the popular favorite, and would have been elected had not Mr. Halm been placed in the field. The friends of Mr. Jacob Barker were of his election, but were disappointed. He is too old, however, and ought to give way to younger men at a crisis when youthful vigor is so much needed. Proceedings in the Federal Congress. The proceedings of the Yankee Congress are highly interesting. A resolution was introduced in the Senate on Tuesday, by