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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
solidated with it now the 32d, those left from its short, sharp experience with Wentworth and John Marshall Brown, at such dear cost leading,--both Bowdoin boys, one the first adjutant of the 20th. Here passes steadily to the front as of yore the 7th Maine Battery, Twitchell, my late college friend, at the head: splendid recessional, for I saw it last in 1864 grimly bastioning the slopes above Rives' Salient, where darkness fell upon my eyes, and I thought to see no more. Following, in Dwight's Division of the Nineteenth Corps, other brave men, known and dear: a battalion of the 1st Maine Veterans, under Captain George Brown; the brigades of stalwart George Beal and clear-eyed Jim Fessenden, my college classmate; the sturdy 15th Maine from its eventful experiences of the Gulf under steadfast-hearted Isaac Dyer, Murray, and Frank Drew; soldierly Nye with the 2gth, made veterans on the Red River and Shenandoah; royal Tom Hubbard, with his 30th, once Frank Fessenden's, whom Surgeon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Kershaw. (search)
lity, was severely wounded; as was also Major D. B. Miller, same battalion. A long list of brave and efficient officers sealed their devotion to the glorious cause with their blood, each of whom merits special mention did the proper limits of this report admit it. All the officers and men of the command behaved most admirably, and are entitled to the gratitude of the country. I am especially indebted to the members of my staff, Captain Holmes, A. A. G.; Lieutenant Doby, A. D. C., and Lieutenant Dwight, A. A. I. G., for most efficient services on the field under the most difficult circumstances. About dark I was ordered to move my brigade to the left to the Peach Orchard, where I remained until noon of the next day, when I was ordered to return to the stone wall. An hour later I was directed to return to the wall where I had first formed line of battle. Hood's division, then commanded by General Law, was engaged with the enemy's cavalry in his front, his line being formed acros
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
s to cover the rear of the retreating forces. Across the road along which the fugitives and pursuers were advancing, General Dwight formed his (First) brigade, and to the left of him was placed the Third Brigade, from which the skirmishers were taked Emory, first threatening his right most seriously, which he strengthened by placing McMillan's reserves on the right of Dwight. Meanwhile the fire of the Unionists had been reserved, but when the foe was at close quarters they opened upon them suctack with about fifteen thousand men. He formed a line of battle with Emory's division in front, his First Brigade, under Dwight, taking the right, and resting on a ravine which ran north of the little village of Pleasant Hill; his Second, General Mind in that. capacity performed gallant service before Port Hudson during Banks's siege of that post. He was then in General Dwight's division, which occupied the left of the attacking line. He was ever ready for perilous duty, and often performed
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
o crippled by the fight, that, he did not move until noon the next day, and then he marched so carefully, that it was not until two days after the battle that he appeared in formidable force in front of the northeastern fortifications of Washington, See map on page 24, volume II. in the vicinity of Fort Stevens. By that time the safety of the city was assured, for during that day July 11, 1864. the remainder of the Sixth Corps arrived there, and was speedily followed by the divisions of Dwight and Grover, of Emory's (Nineteenth) corps, which had just arrived at Fortress Monroe by sea, from New Orleans, and had been sent immediately up the Potomac to the Capital by Grant. On the following day Early menaced Washington, when Augur sent out a strong reconnoitering party from Fort Stevens, to develop the strength of the Confederates. A sharp skirmish ensued, in which each party lost almost three hundred men. Satisfied that the opportunity for seizing Washington was passed, and alar
skirmish at, 2.66. Dublin Station, Va., battle near, 3.315. Dug Springs, battle at, 2.46. Duke of Chartres, on McClellan's staff, 2.131. Dupont, Admiral S. F., commands the naval force in the Port Royal expedition, 2.115; operations of on the coast of Florida, 2.320; operations of against the defenses of Charleston, 3.192-3.197. Dutch Gap, Confederate naval attack on obstructions at, 3.531. Dutch Gap Canal, construction of, 3.357. Duval's Bluff, capture of, 2.582. Dwight, Gen., at the siege of Port Hudson, 2.631. E. Early, Gen., Jubal, expedition sent out by in the Shenandoah Valley, 3.313; his invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, 3.341-3.350; operations of in the Shenandoah Valley to the battle of Cedar Creek. 3.363-3.372. East Tennessee, cruel treatment of Unionists in, 2.36-2.39; minor military movements in, 3.281; journey of the author in, in 1866, 3.283, 287. Edenton, N. C., capture of, 2.176. Elizabeth City, N. C., capture of, 2.174.
rdinary manner, and the latter were blackened as though he had been in a prize-fight. His nearest friends would have difficulty in recognising him, and I am sure that he will never again enter the army, even though he should quite recover from his frightful wound. In an upper room of the college our wounded of the Excelsior brigade were found. The enemy had not time to carry them off, and very fortunately, for the journey to Richmond must have proved painful, if not fatal, to many. Colonel Dwight, of the First regiment, was stretched upon a cot in the centre of the room. His wound in the leg had been partially dressed, but he was by no means comfortable. In response to the General's commendation of his conduct on the field, he stated that he would not have given up, but for the severity of his wound, and that the approbation of his commanding officer more than compensated for his suffering. By the order of the General he was at once removed to a private house near at hand, and
ible now to determine. Col. Murphy, Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania, is known to be a prisoner. Major Dwight, of the Second Massachusetts, while gallantly bringing up the rear of the regiment, was misser cover of the darkness of the night. The conduct of officers and men was most admirable. Major Dwight who was in immediate command of the rear-guard, displayed much courage and skill. Our loss immissioned officers wounded, both slightly, were Capt. Mudge and Second-Lieut. Crowninshield. Major Dwight and Assistant-Surgeon Stone are missing. Very respectfully, your obt. serv't, Geo. L. Andy affair took place. Hoofs were heard, and soon cavalry appeared; but the skirmishers, under Major Dwight, were ready. Part of company A on one side of the road and of company C on the other, with p as more are hoped to have escaped, who sank from sickness in crowds. But, as yet, the noble Major Dwight, as gallant an officer as ever lived, generous, beloved, who commanded the reserve of the Sec
ral, Your most obedient servant, Edward Ferrero, Brigadier-General Brigadier-General S. D. Sturgis, Commanding Second Division, Ninth Army Corps. Report of General French. headquarters French's division, Sumner's corps, camp on battle-field, near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 21, 1862. Lieut.-Colonel Taylor, Chief of Staff, Sumner's Corps: Colonel: My division, composed of Brig.-Gens. Max Weber's and Kimball's brigades, and three regiments of new levies, under the command of Col. Dwight, (Fourteenth Connecticut,) having been in readiness since daybreak on the seventeenth instant, was put in motion by order of the General commanding the corps at about half-past 7 o'clock A. M. The Antietam Creek was forded by the division marching in three columns of brigades, Max Weber on the left, the new regiments in the centre, and Kimball's brigade on the right. When my left flank had cleared the ford a mile, the division faced to the left, forming three lines of battle, adjacent
ral, Your most obedient servant, Edward Ferrero, Brigadier-General Brigadier-General S. D. Sturgis, Commanding Second Division, Ninth Army Corps. Report of General French. headquarters French's division, Sumner's corps, camp on battle-field, near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 21, 1862. Lieut.-Colonel Taylor, Chief of Staff, Sumner's Corps: Colonel: My division, composed of Brig.-Gens. Max Weber's and Kimball's brigades, and three regiments of new levies, under the command of Col. Dwight, (Fourteenth Connecticut,) having been in readiness since daybreak on the seventeenth instant, was put in motion by order of the General commanding the corps at about half-past 7 o'clock A. M. The Antietam Creek was forded by the division marching in three columns of brigades, Max Weber on the left, the new regiments in the centre, and Kimball's brigade on the right. When my left flank had cleared the ford a mile, the division faced to the left, forming three lines of battle, adjacent
Music of the Port Royal negroes.--The editor of Dwight's Journal of Music publishes a letter from Miss Lucy McKim, of Philadelphia, accompanying a specimen of the songs in vogue among the negroes about Port Royal. Miss McKim acccompanied her father thither on a recent visit, and writes as follows: It is difficult to express the entire character of these negro ballads by mere musical notes and signs. The odd turns made in the throat, and the curious rhythmic effect produced by single voices chiming in at different irregular intervals, seem almost as impossible to place on score as the singing of birds or the tones of an Aeolian harp. The airs, however, can be reached. They are too decided not to be easily understood, and their striking originality would catch the ear of any musician. Besides this, they are valuable as an expression of the character and life of the race which is playing such a conspicuous part in our history. The wild, sad strains tell, as the sufferers
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