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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), The Mercedita: air — the battle of Bull run. (search)
The Mercedita: air — the battle of Bull run. Come all you loyal seamen, a song I'll sing to you, It's of a gallant steamer, now on the ocean's blue; Her name's the Mercedita, rigged as a barquentine, A bully ship and a bully crew as ever yet was seen. Stellwagen is our captain, his knowledge none can doubt, The prizes we have taken have shown that he's about; And there's Lieutenant Abbot, beloved by us all, Then Wilder, Gover, Baldwin, we hope they ne'er will fall. The next is Mr. Dwyer, no braver man can be; And then comes Doctor Mason, no kinder man he; Then Steine and Rogers, they come next, both good men and brave; A better group of officers ne'er crossed the ocean wave. The engineers are all the same, just what we seamen like; There's Doig, Martin, and Munger, who always keep us right. Another name I'll give you now, none bolder or more sound, It's Rockefeller puts us through when we are homeward bound. The gallant Mercedita, with all her gallant crew, She hoists her flag up t
fifteenth, writes to that paper a description of a remarkable atmospheric phenomenon witnessed in that town. It was seen by our pickets, a few miles from the town. The same scene has been described in several respectable papers, the editors of which all vouch for the reliability of their informants. The writer says: A remarkable phenomenon was witnessed, a few miles west of this place, at the house of Mrs. Pearcy, on the first day of this month, at about three o'clock P. M, by Mr. Moses Dwyer, her neighbor, who happened to be seated in her porch at the time, as well as by others at or near the house. The weather was quite hot and dry; not a cloud could be seen; no wind even ruffled the foliage on the surrounding trees. All things being propitious, the grand panorama began to move. Just over and through the tops of the trees, on the adjacent hills on the South, immense numbers of rolls, resembling cotton or smoke, apparently of the size and shape of doors, seemed to be
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], A remarkable Phenomenon...a Chapter of similar ones. (search)
Va., Sept. 15th, writes to that paper a description of a remarkable atmospheric phenomenon witnessed in that town. It was seen by our pickets a few miles from the town. The same scene has been described in several respectable papers, the editors of which all vouch for the reliability of their informants. The writer says: A remarkable phenomenon was witnessed a few miles west of this place, at the house of Mrs. Pearey, on the first day of this month, at about 3 o'clock P. M., by Mr. Moses Dwyer, her neighbor, who happened to be scatted in her porch at the time, as well as by others at or near the house. The weather was quite hot and dry, not a cloud could be seen, no wind even ruffled the foliage on the surrounding trees. All things being propitious, the grand panorama began to move. Just over and through the tops of the trees on the adjacent hills on the South, immense numbers of rolls resembling cotton or smoke, apparently of the size and shape of doors, seemed to be