hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
ue of mercy or escape closed. His friends told him there was still a slight gleam of hope. He responded that he himself entertained none, nor would exchange, he declared, the penalty of death for the living death of perpetual or indefinite imprisonment; he preferred an open grave to a vault. General Dix allowed his friends to visit him freely. Ministers of his own Church brought him the holy unction of their message, and those of other denominations called on similar errands. The Rev. Joshua Van Dyke visited him on the day before his execution and writes: I found him to be all that you had described him, and much more. He was confined in a narrow and gloomy cell, with a lamp burning at mid-day; but he received me with as much ease as if he were in his own parlor, and his conversation revealed at every turn the gentleman, the scholar and the Christian. There was no bravado, no strained heroism, no excitement in his words or manner, but a quiet trust in God, and a composure in v
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), John Yates Beall, gallant soldier (search)
dministering the oath of allegiance to the inmates of an insane asylum and treating them with cruelty. Beall well remembered the ashes and ruins of thousands of homes in Virginia, which marked the pathway of Federal invasion, and he also remembered the brutal treatment inflicted by Federal soldiers upon his mother and sisters. Captain Beall knew that General Dix's utterance was in default of the penalty which he himself attached to the violations of the laws of civilized warfare. Rev. Joshua Van Dyke, of New York, visited Captain Beall the day preceding his execution, and he said: I found Captain Beall in a narrow, gloomy cell, with a lamp burning at midday, but he received me with as much ease as if he were in his own parlor. Captain Beall's conversation revealed at every turn, the scholar, the gentleman, and true Christian. There was no bravado, no strained heroism, no excitement in his words or manner, but a quiet trust in God and a composure in view of death, such as I have