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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 25 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 23 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 22 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. Captain James B. Eads. Of the services of Captain Eads to the Western flotillaCaptain Eads to the Western flotilla, the Reverend C. B. Boynton says, in his History of the Navy : During the month of July, 1861, the Quartermaster-General adpi River. The bids were opened on the 5th of August, and Mr. Eads was found to be the best bidder for the whole number, botme of completion and price. On the 7th of August, 1861, Mr. Eads signed a contract with Quartermaster-General Meigs to con many thousands of dollars were thus gratuitously paid by Mr. Eads when it was finished. On the 12th of October, 1861, the he boat, she could be got off. He replied, very promptly, Mr. Eads, if you will undertake to get her off, I shall be very witurned to me with great calmness and composure, and said, Mr. Eads, I must ask you to excuse me for a few minutes while I goth a look of great gravity and decision, he replied: Mr. Eads, I cannot permit you to stay here a moment after the tug
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The gun-boats at Belmont and Fort Henry. (search)
1861, Commander John Rodgers purchased, and Wharf-boat at Cairo. From a war-time photograph. he, with Commander Roger N. Stembel, Lieutenant S. L. Phelps, and Mr. Eads, altered, equipped, and manned, for immediate service on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 3 wooden gun-boats — the Tyler, of 6 8-inch shell-guns and 2 32-pounderan as many regiments could have done. On October 12th, 1861, the St. Louis, afterward known as the De Kalb, the first of the seven iron-clad gunboats ordered of Mr. Eads by the Government, was launched at Carondelet, near St. Louis. The other iron-clads, the Cincinnati, Carondelet, Louisville, Mound City, Cairo, and Pittsburgh, were launched soon after the St. Louis, Mr. Eads having pushed forward the work with most commendable zeal and energy. Three of these were built at Mound City, Ill. To the fleet of ironclads above named were added the Benton (the largest and best vessel of the Western flotilla), the Essex, and a few smaller and partly armored gun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
Delamater iron works, New York, December 27, 1863. The first step in the creation of the Mississippi flotilla was taken in May, 1861, by Commander John Rodgers, who, acting under the authority of the War Department, purchased at Cincinnati three river-steamboats, the Conestoga, Lexington, and Tyler, and altered them into gun-boats by strengthening their frames, lowering their machinery, and protecting their decks by heavy bulwarks. In August, the War Department made a contract with James B. Eads [see page 338], the famous engineer of the Mississippi jetties, to build in two months seven gun-boats, propelled by a central paddle-wheel, and covered with armor two and a half inches thick, on the forward end of the casemates and on the sides abreast of the engines. These may be said to have been our first iron-clads, light as their plating was, and imperfectly as it covered the vessels. In spite of all their defects, they performed constant service of incalculable importance throug
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
aval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. Commander Rodgers. River steamers fitted and armed as gun-boats. commencement of the Mississippi squadron. Captain A. H. Foote ordered to command the Western flotilla. James B. Eads. Commodore Stringham relieved. commands given to flag officers Dupont and McKean. the Port Royal expedition fitted out. assembling of the ships of war and transports at Hampton Roads. frail ships. the expedition reaches Port Royal harboelled to the proportions of a fleet, all his talents and energies being devoted to the task of making it a formidable force such as the necessities of the case demanded. In this work Captain Foote was assisted by that distinguished engineer, James B. Eads, who planned and built that class of iron-clads known on the Mississippi as turtle backs, which gave such a good account of themselves during the war,and fought their way through many a bloody encounter, from Fort Henry to Grand Gulf, Port Hu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. James B. Eads engaged to build gun-boats. depot established a was fortunate in possessing, in the person of Mr. James B. Eads, the very man for the occasion. Mr. Eads undeMr. Eads undertook to build seven large gun-boats, heavily plated on the bow and lighter on the sides. which were calculattrod the deck of a vessel-of-war. Foote, Rodgers, Eads and their assistants put forth all their energies toising the work of construction; but with their aid Mr. Eads soon completed an efficient flotilla, which obtain 1861, Quartermaster General Meigs contracted with Mr. Eads to build a number of iron-clad gun-boats for the Wfficers. Within two weeks after the contract with Eads was signed, four thousand men were busily engaged ining boat, purchased by General Fremont and sent to Mr. Eads, whose ideas developing as he went on building, he Such a performance needs no eulogy, and even had Mr. Eads done no more in the cause of the Union, he would h
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
ch was on the lathe when Sumter fired the first gun. If the Southerners did not make their plans before the war actually broke out, they deserve unbounded credit for the energy displayed in getting into existence such formidable vessels as they did before the North had done anything but build the little Monitor, which was ready nearly on the same day that the Merrimac created such consternation at Hampton Roads. It is true, that through the enterprise and energy of a western man, Mr. James B. Eads, we got some iron-clads afloat on the Mississippi, but it was not until the 17th of June, 1861, that the Quartermaster-general of the Army issued proposals for building the vessels. Great progress was made upon these quasi iron-clads when the work was once under full headway; but with all the remarkable services they performed, what were they when compared with the Virginia, the Louisiana, the Albemarle, Atlanta, Mobile, and three large vessels built or building at Yazoo City — the Mi
egular army; John A. McClernand, an Illinois lawyer and member of Congress, and Lew Wallace, the future author of Ben Hur. The gunboat that fired the first shot at Fort Henry Flag-officer Foote Here, riding at anchor, lies the flagship of Foote, which opened the attack on Fort Henry in the first movement to break the backbone of the Confederacy, and won a victory before the arrival of the army. This gunboat, the Cincinnati, was one of the seven flat-bottom ironclads built by Captain Eads at Carondelet, Missouri, and Mound City, Illinois, during the latter half of 1861. When Grant finally obtained permission from General Halleck to advance the attack upon Fort Henry on the Tennessee River, near the border of Kentucky, Flag Officer Foote started up the river, February 2, 1862, convoying the transports, loaded with the advance detachment of Grant's seventeen thousand troops. Arriving before Fort Henry on February 6th, the intrepid naval commander at once began the bombardm
The creator of the fleet of gunboats with which we now have to deal was that master-builder, James B. Eads. It was on August 7, 1861, that Eads signed a contract with the Government to build and delEads signed a contract with the Government to build and deliver seven ironclads, each one hundred and seventy-five feet long, fifty-one feet wide, drawing six feet of water, and carrying thirteen guns. In a week or two four thousand men were at work on the cfinished at the end of sixty-five days. The Government refused to pay for them. And the builder, Eads — what did he do? He went ahead and used up his own fortune to finish those gunboats, Thefederate vessels. Commodore Hollins did not court a meeting to try conclusions with the powerful Eads gunboats and the mortar boats, which he supposed were all making their way down upon him. The fla sunk by a torpedo in the Yazoo River. This photograph was a gift to the present owner from James B. Eads, the builder. with him that the running of the batteries was too great a risk, except one--
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
ckade, and by the end of the year the ports of the Confederacy were fairly well guarded by Federal vessels cruising at their harbors' mouths. The expedition to Hilton Head and the taking of Forts Walker and Beauregard had given the navy a much coveted base on the Southern shore. Still, every month new vessels were added, and there was growing on the Mississippi a fleet destined for a warfare new in naval annals. Seven ironclads were built and two remodeled under the supervision of Captain James B. Eads. There were also three wooden gunboats, and later on, in the summer of 1862, at the suggestion of Flag-Officer Davis, the fleet of light-draft vessels, known as tin-clads, was organized. For some time the gunboats and tin-clads operating in conjunction with the Western armies had been under the supervision of the War Department, and separate from the navy entirely. But very soon this was to be changed, and the entire Mississippi forces and those engaged in the Western and Southe
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
The birth of the ironclads The river ironclad Essex : one of James B. Eads' Mississippi monsters, converted by him from a snag-boat, and completed in Jathe rivers — the Pittsburg The Pittsburg was one of the seven ironclads that Eads completed in a hundred days. She first went into action at Fort Donelson, where els the dangers of the return. She was one of the most serviceable of the first Eads ironclads. The Cincinnati, a salvaged gunboat The Cincinnati was one of the first seven Eads ironclads to be built and was the second to meet disaster. She was Foote's flagship at Fort Henry and in the engagement she was struck thirty-one Monarchs of the flotilla Below appears the Federal ironclad Benton. As James B. Eads went on constructing gunboats for the Mississippi squadron, he kept improvithe fall of the key to the Mississippi. The Louisville, one of the original Eads ironclads U S. Gunboat Benton, tug Fern The Ellet rams. After the G
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