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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 261 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 218 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 206 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 206 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 199 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 165 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 149 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 113 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 102 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Early or search for J. A. Early in all documents.

Your search returned 132 results in 19 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
te line was a long one, and the perfect co-operation in the attack needed, to prevent General Meade, whose line was a short one, from using the same troops at more than one point, was difficult of attainment. Two of the corps commanders, Hill and Ewell, were new in their places. Longstreet's attack on the Federal left on the 2d was delayed beyond the expected time, and was not promptly seconded by Hill and Ewell when made. Ewell's divisions were not made to act in concert — Johnson, Early, Rodes acting in succession. General Lee always expressed the strongest conviction that had the Confederate corps attacked General Meade simultaneously on either the 2d or 3d, he would have succeeded in overthrowing the Federal army; that he had used every effort to insure concert of action, but had failed. He said that he had consulted Ewell, and told him if he could not carry his part of the line, he would move his corps to the right of Longstreet, and threaten the Federal communicatio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Garland's report of the battle of seven Pines. (search)
all six pieces. Later in the afternoon he was ordered up near the captured works to relieve Captain Carter and rake the road. He reached that ground in time to render handsome service in playing upon the enemy's reinforcements coming up the road. The loss of the battery was Private Knight, killed; Privates J. A. Meek and James Spinner, wounded; twelve horses killed or disabled. I must not omit to acknowledge the valuable services of Captain Gardner, Assistant Adjutant-General upon General Early's staff, who volunteered to render me his assistance. I assigned him to duty with the Twenty-fourth Virginia, with whom he went into the fight, exhibiting both coolness and discretion. In concluding this report, it becomes my duty to pay the last tribute of respect to the memory of my Assistant Adjutant-General, Captain J. Lawrence Meem, whose conspicuous gallantry won the admiration of all who saw him, and added to the laurels which he had gathered at Williamsburg and on previous fi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of Second South Carolina regiment in campaigns of 1864 and 1865. (search)
lph Elliott, a brother of General Stephen Elliott. He was a brave soldier and a most estimables gentleman. The regiment was at the siege of Petersburg and did good service there. They threw up breastworks under a heavy fire, and held them for eight days until relieved. The regiment was then held in reserve at Petersburg and was thrown continually to the extremities of the line to resist the flank movements of the enemy. It was afterwards sent to the Valley and operated there under General Early for several months, sharing his victories and defeats. It was then ordered back to the lines in front of Richmond, and was marched almost every night in midwinter, the ground covered with snow, to some threatened point, and was at last sent to South Carolina, in January, 1865, to aid in defending its native State from the invasion of Sherman. But they were marched to Charleston whilst Sherman was burning Columbia, evacuated that place with scarcely an enemy in sight, and were conducted
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Monocacy-report of General John B. Gordon. (search)
Battle of Monocacy-report of General John B. Gordon. [It was eclipsed at the time by other stirring events, but there was scarcely a more gallant fight made during the war than that in which, after a march of fourteen miles that morning, General Early defeated General Lew Wallace at Monocacy. Our readers will he glad to see the report of the battle given by Major-General John B. Gordon, who bore the brunt of the battle with his accustomed skill and gallantry.] headquarters Gordon's division, July 22d, 1864. Major J. Stoddard Johnston, Assistant Adjutant-General, Breckinride's Corps: Major — In accordance with orders from corps headquarters I have the honor to submit the following report. About 2 1/2 P. M., 9th of July, I was ordered by Major-General Breckinridge, commanding corps, to move my division to the right and cross the Monocacy about one mile below the bridge and ford (on the Georgetown pike), which were then held by the enemy, On reaching the river I directe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Edward Johnson of capture of Winchester. (search)
Jones' and Nicholls' brigades to the left in a body of woods. Later in the day the brigades to the right of the road were advanced under cover of woods to a position nearer, the town, where they remained until the following morning. When General Early advanced on the left, a body of the enemy's infantry, retreating, became exposed to view, and were fired upon by two rifle guns of Carpenter's with good effect, greatly accellerating their speed. This attracted the fire from the fortificatioltory manner until nightfall. The casualties in my command during the day's operations were, happily, few; two men killed and three horses disabled. The following day--14th--was occupied in engaging the enemy's attention upon the right, while Early was putting his command in position on the left for the main attack upon the fortifications. For this purpose, the Stonewall brigade, Brigadier-General J. A. Walker commanding, was moved across the Millwood pike to a range of hills east of and f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ugust 10th, 1863. To Major John W. Daniel, A. A. G., Early's Division: Major — I have the honor to report that my brigade began the march with Early's division from Hamilton's crossing on the 4th of June last. Halting lf miles from Winchester, when, as ordered by Major-General Early, I moved to the left of this road and formed own and fort. In accordance with orders from Major-General Early, received in the night of the 14th, I began teaching this place my brigade was detached by Major-General Early from the division and ordered on a different . In accordance with prior instructions from Major-General Early, I moved directly through, having sent in fro of July 1st. In accordance with orders from Major-General Early, I formed my brigade in line of battle on the was severely wounded. I was here ordered by Major-General Early to halt. I had no means of ascertaining thy near Fairfield, Virginia. I was ordered by Major-General Early to hold him in check until the wagon and divi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence concerning the campaign of 1864. (search)
ction, let them know that I am here. Yours, very respectfully, Wade Hampton, Major-General. headquarters Longstreet's corps, 8 P. M.--May 30, 1864. Major-General J. A. Early, Commanding Second Corps: General--General Field reports having come upon an entrenched line of the enemy, and owing to that circumstance, and the appment to our right continuing, corresponding changes were made in our line, Breckinridge's command and two divisions of General Hill being placed on the right. General Early, with Ewell's corps and Heth's division, occupied our left, and was directed to endeavor to get upon the enemy's right flank and drive down in front of our line. General Early made the movement in the afternoon, and drove the enemy from his entrenchments, following him until dark. While this attack was progressing, General Hill reinforced Breckinridge with two brigades of Wilcox's division, and dislodged the enemy from Turkey Hill, in front of our extreme right. Very respectfully, y
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg. (search)
r, did not advance on me; but late in the evening our friends did — Early's brigade charged my works from the left and rear. Nobody, either when they for the first time learned where the enemy were. Two of Early's regiments were stopped in the wood and proper direction given to Fifth North Carolina and a Virginia regiment commanded by a Lieutenant-Colonel Early--a brother, I was told, of the General. The Fifth North the wood on the left, nearer to the enemy than my redoubt on which Early's regiment charged, and was moving in fine style upon them. Early'Early's regiment never recovered from the confusion into which they were thrown by the taking of my works. They were formed, however, and started uely to the left to the wood, and I saw no more of them. I met General Early near this redoubt, himself and horse both wounded, and told himmoved them all forward into the gap left by the oblique movement of Early's regiment into the woods. We advanced to within a hundred yards o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
ediately began to retreat the same night. General Early, being the senior officer, directed the pus command was now temporarily changed. Before Early's arrival he had been in command of all the forton's brigades) formed into a corps — so that Early's command at this time consisted as follows: Bdge's corps of Echols' and Gordon's divisions, Early's corps of Rodes' and Ramseur's divisions, witd to Washington being open (forty-five miles), Early marched on the Middletown road next day (10th) meantime General Breckinridge proposed to General Early the resumption of offensive operations, anthe Valley. With the advance of Sheridan, General Early fell back and again took position on Fishewith one division of infantry to reinforce General Early, and arrived in the Luray Valley, six or ee fact that Sheridan had retreated. Instantly Early was in pursuit, but it was useless. Sheridan pede. Sheridan at this juncture advanced, and Early only succeeded in getting off the bulk of his [10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Telegrams concerning operations around Richmond and Petersburg in 1864. (search)
Telegrams concerning operations around Richmond and Petersburg in 1864. near Petersburg, Virginia, August 16th, 1864--8 A. M. General R. E. Lee, Chaffin's Bluff: All quiet yesterday and last night. Scouts report Second corps marched with five days rations; expedition must then be only a division to prevent Early being reinforced. G. T. Beauregard. near Petersburg, Virginia, August 17th, 1864--10 A. M. General R. E. Lee, Chaffin's Bluff: All quiet here yesterday and last night. No material change reported in enemy's movements or position. Thirty-six wagons and ten ambulances passed this morning on Military road, rear Battery Five, going in direction of City Point. G. T. Beauregard. near Petersburg, August 17th, 1864--5 P. M. General R. E. Lee, Chaffin's Bluff: Have ordered over batteries to open daily for thirty minutes at 2 and 3 A. M., to prevent enemy's concentration of troops for an attack. G. T. Beauregard. near Petersburg, August 18th, 1864--10.15 A. M
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