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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From Gettysburg to the coming of Grant. (search)
Union Corps. hannock were two formidable works, both on the left of the railroad, and connected by a curtain or chain of rifle-pits; a further line of rifle-pits ran left from the left redoubt some distance along the river. Two brigades of General Early's corps held the works. The Sixth Corps went into position about midday to our right of the railroad and opened fire from its batteries. The Fifth Corps occupied the river-front below the line of the railroad. The batteries made but littleescribed it as the most brilliant feat of arms he had yet seen, and said, with some mixture of humor and pathos, that less than half an hour before our attack he made reply to a question from General Lee, who had ridden over to the works with General Early, that he wanted no more men, and that he could hold the position against the whole Yankee army. The position captured was commanded, and in some sense supported, by works on the farther side of the river, but the capture of the redoubts was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
nd also forced back; then Gordon's brigade, of Early's division, which had been formed facing southpike, Rodes's division on the right of it, and Early's in reserve. So far Ewell had been engaged oction, with steady and determined attacks upon Early's front, until nightfall. The Confederates st and heavy assaults were made upon the line of Early's division. So persistent were these attacks rmined attack upon it. In this movement General Early was in command, and all of his division sh1865. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons), General Early drew back his brigades and formed a new lighter. Hill's corps (now under command of General Early) did not arrive until the next morning, Ma severe loss. General Gordon, whose division (Early's) was in reserve and under orders Spotsylva, while, on the other side of the salient, General Early, who was moving with a part of Hill's corp Cold Harbor, while the other two looked after Early's (Ewell's) corps near Bethesda Church. In th[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
nd Corps, A. N. V. During this night orders were issued from Meade for the operations of the next day: Hancock was to endeavor to find the position of the enemy's left, to force him from the position of his (Hancock's) front. The Sixth Corps was ordered to feel the intrenchments near the center. Mott's division of Hancock's corps, still kept north of the Po River with Wright, and on the left of the Sixth Corps, was to prepare to join Burnside, who with his corps (the Ninth) was to attack Early from the east on the morning of the 10th. But at dawn on the 10th an examination of the Block House bridge, made by Hancock, showed that the enemy was strongly intrenched on the east side of the Po at that point. However, Brooke's brigade of Barlow's division was sent down the Po River to a point half a mile below the bridge. Brooke discovered the enemy in strong force holding intrenchments extending nearly half a mile below the bridge, their left resting on the Po River. But other a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hand-to-hand fighting at Spotsylvania. (search)
hing to a point on the left of the Sixth Corps' former position in the neighborhood of the Brown house, massing his troops in that vicinity. [See map, p. 167.] General Grant's orders to Hancock were to assault at daylight on the 12th in cooperation with Burnside on his left, while Wright and Warren were held in readiness to assault on his right. The Confederate army was composed of three corps--Longstreet (now R. H. Anderson) on their left, Ewell in the center, and A. P. Hill (now under Early) on the right. The point to be assaulted was a salient of field-works on the Confederate center, afterward called the Bloody angle. It was held by General Edward Johnson's division. Here the Confederate line broke off at an angle of ninety degrees, the right parallel, about the length of a small brigade, being occupied by General George H. Steuart's regiments. Steuart occupied only part of the right parallel; Jones, Stafford, and Hays were on his left, and Lane was on his right in that
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
amkin's (Va.) Battery; Ramsay's (N. C.) Battery. Cabell's Battalion, Col. Henry C. Cabell: Callaway's ´╝łGa.) Battery; Carlton's (Ga.) Battery; McCarthy's (Va.) Battery; Manly's (N. C.) Battery. Second Army Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Richard S. Ewell. Early's division, Maj.-Gen. Jubal A. Early. Hays's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Harry T. Hays: 5th La., Lieut.-Col. Bruce Menger; 6th La., Maj. William H. Manning; 7th La., Maj. J. M. Wilson; 8th La.,----; 9th La.,----. Pegram's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John PegrMaj.-Gen. Jubal A. Early. Hays's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Harry T. Hays: 5th La., Lieut.-Col. Bruce Menger; 6th La., Maj. William H. Manning; 7th La., Maj. J. M. Wilson; 8th La.,----; 9th La.,----. Pegram's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Pegram: 13th Va., Col. James B. Terrill; 31st Va., Col. John S. Hoffman; 49th Va., Col. J. C. Gibson; 52d Va.,----; 58th Va.,----. Gordon's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John B. Gordon: 13th Ga.,----; 26th Ga., Col. E. N. Atkinson; 31st Ga., Col. C. A. Evans; 38th Ga.,----; 60th Ga., Lieut.-Col. Thomas J. Berry; 61st Ga.,----. Johnson's division, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Stonewall Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James A. Walker: 2d Va., Capt. C. H. Stewart; 4th Va., Col. William Terry; 5th Va.,----; 27th Va., Lieu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
e reason the editors have also found it impossible to give the strength of the army. It is nowhere authoritatively stated. Upon this subject Colonel Walter H. Taylor ( Four years with General Lee, p. 136) remarks: The only reenforcements received by General Lee were as follows: Near Hanover Junction he was joined by a small force under General Breckinridge, . . . 2200 strong, and Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps, which had been on detached duty in North Carolina. Hoke's brigade of Early's division, 1200 strong, which had been on detached duty at the Junction, here also rejoined its division; and at Cold Harbor General Lee received the division of General Hoke, also just from North Carolina--the two divisions (Pickett's and Hoke's) numbering 11000 men. The aggregate of these reenforcements (14,400 men), added to General Lee's original strength [which Colonel Taylor estimates at 64,000], would give 78,400 as the aggregate of all troops engaged under him from the Wilderness to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Richmond raid. (search)
e abdomen. Deep in the hearts of all true cavalrymen, North and South, will ever burn a sentiment of admiration mingled with regret for this knightly soldier and generous man. Sheridan had succeeded in his purpose, but he had found a foeman worthy of his steel. If defeated at this point the enemy was not annihilated. Richmond was awakening to its peril; and, aware of the weakness of the garrison, the Confederate authorities felt very uneasy. As when the Germans approached Paris or when Early menaced Washington, a general call to arms was made. But Nature seemed rather favorable to defensive operations. For three days it had rained more or less, and a little rain in the region of the Chickahominy is known to go a great way toward making a mortar-bed of the roads and meadows. About midnight the column moved forward in the order: Wilson, Merritt, Gregg. Captain Field, 4th United States Artillery (then serving with Fitzhugh's battery), writes of the experience of Wilson's comman
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Notes on Cold Harbor. (search)
for the first time, I think, the men in the ranks of the Army of Northern Virginia realized that the era of experimental campaigns against us was over; that Grant was not going to retreat; that he was not to be removed from command because he had failed to break Lee's resistance; and that the policy of pounding had begun, and would continue until our strength should be utterly worn away, unless by some decisive blow to the army in our front, or some brilliant movement in diversion,--such as Early's invasion of Maryland a little later was intended to be,--we should succeed in changing the character of the contest. We began to understand that Grant had taken hold of the problem of destroying the Confederate strength in the only way that the strength of such an army, so commanded, could be destroyed, and that he intended to continue the plodding work till the task should be accomplished, wasting very little time or strength in efforts to make a brilliant display of generalship in a con
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
n on his flank and rear. This was repulsed by Early, commanding Hill's corps (Hill being ill). Almchecked by the brigades of Hill's corps, under Early, which held the lines on. the right of the salhe war. Lee's position during the day was near Early's lines, where he observed, from time to time, of Hancock's attack, and counter-movements of Early's troops. He was with the artillery when it bort. He expected much from Burnside also, but Early's counter-movements in part prevented the realth sides. On the 18th an attack was made on Early's left and easily repulsed, though some of theetly. Lee's troops were in high spirits. General Early, on the 6th and 7th of June, made two effoHunter's expedition, and on the 13th to detach Early with the Second Corps, now numbering some eighd already detached Breckinridge's division and Early's corps to meet Hunter at Lynchburg. And, aft before Lynchburg toward western Virginia, and Early, after a brief pursuit, marched into Maryland,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
nes of intrenchment and a surplus for expeditions, detached General Jubal A. Early with the equivalent of a corps to drive Hunter away from Lyis nearest base, thereby exposing the Valley of Virginia; whereupon Early, an educated soldier, promptly resolved to take advantage of the ocm New Orleans. These troops arrived at the very nick of time,--met Early's army in the suburbs of Washington, and drove it back to the Valley of Virginia. This most skillful movement of Early demonstrated to General Grant the importance of the Valley of Virginia, not only as a ckly ascertained its strength and resources, and resolved to attack Early in the position which he had chosen in and about Winchester, Va. Heut on his opportune return his army resumed the offensive, defeated Early, captured nearly all his artillery, and drove him completely out ofm the subsequent problem of the war. Sheridan's losses were 5995 to Early's 4200 ; but these losses are no just measure of the results of tha
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