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ies and counter-sallies were continual occurrences after dark. In stealthy sorties one side or the other frequently captured the opposing pickets before alarm could be given. No night was without its special hazard. During the day the pastime here was sharp-shooting with muskets and rifled cannon. Approaching the post of danger — Petersburg, 1865 A few steps nearer the picket line In behind the shelter Grant determined to bring Sheridan from the Shenandoah, whence the bulk of Early's forces had been withdrawn, and send him to assist Sherman. Sheridan left Winchester February 27th, wreaking much destruction as he advanced, but circumstances compelled him to seek a new base at White House. On March 27th he formed a junction with the armies of the Potomac and the James. Such were the happenings that prompted Lee to prepare for the evacuation of Petersburg. And he might be able, in his rapid marches, to outdistance Grant, join his forces with those of Johnston, fall on
ies and counter-sallies were continual occurrences after dark. In stealthy sorties one side or the other frequently captured the opposing pickets before alarm could be given. No night was without its special hazard. During the day the pastime here was sharp-shooting with muskets and rifled cannon. Approaching the post of danger — Petersburg, 1865 A few steps nearer the picket line In behind the shelter Grant determined to bring Sheridan from the Shenandoah, whence the bulk of Early's forces had been withdrawn, and send him to assist Sherman. Sheridan left Winchester February 27th, wreaking much destruction as he advanced, but circumstances compelled him to seek a new base at White House. On March 27th he formed a junction with the armies of the Potomac and the James. Such were the happenings that prompted Lee to prepare for the evacuation of Petersburg. And he might be able, in his rapid marches, to outdistance Grant, join his forces with those of Johnston, fall on
Cav., Army of West Virginia; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 100 killeen. Sigel's Reserve Division; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 20 killedrook and portion of Sixth Corps; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 30 killed, 1nion, Averell's Cav.; Confed., Cavalry of Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 38 killed, 1 Sixth Corps and Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 10 killed, 9d, Va. Union, Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 2 killed, 18v., Maj.-Gen. Phil. Sheridan; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 749 killeCuster's, and Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's army. Losses: Union, 644 killed, 's and Custer's Cav.; Confed., Cavalry of Gen. Early's army. Losses: Union, 43 killed and wdivisions of Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 35 killed[14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
he jaunty bearing of Lee's men, as shrewdly out of beef at this time as ever were the English at Agincourt, was not due in a measure to the fact that just then their eyes were gladdened by droves of fat cattle sent them by an old comrade--Lieutenant-General Jubal Early, who, without the trifling formality of a commission from Governor Curtin, had assumed the duties of Acting Commissary-General of the rich Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Later (September 16th, 1864), Hampton made his brilliant rthern Virginia passed out in retreat. Thus were yielded at the last forty miles of entrenchments guarded by less than 40,000 men, In field returns for February, 1865, the number given is 59,094 for Department of Northern Virginia, but as General Early very pertinently remarks, this affords no just criterion of the real strength of that army, as those returns included the forces in the Valley and other outlying commands not available for duty on the lines. --Southern Historical Society Pape
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
t into dungeons, in open day, without accusation or form of trial, any one of their white fellow countrymen or countrywomen whom they may suspect of want of fealty to their arbitrary domination. As a proof of it, the Old Capitol and Carroll Prison, near by, Fort Warren, Fortress Monroe, Fort McHenry and others are used for confining, without trial or charges, hundreds of excellent Northern citizens. My thoughts wandered, too, to my last visit to Washington, with arms in my hands, under General Early. Certainly the vicissitudes of war are passing strange! At 8 o'clock we were summoned down stairs to the mess-room, where we breakfasted on a slice of baker's bread, one and a half inches thick, and a cup of weak tea. At 10 o'clock I went to Surgeon's call, and got some liniment for my leg. The long exposure in the cold on the wharf yesterday did not benefit my wound. At 2 o'clock we went to dinner, and found in each plate a small piece of beef, with a smaller piece of pork, and a sli
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
hors), and here I found a misrepresentation of the conduct of the troops of General Early, which I received as true, and repeated on page 290 of my book. As soon as I received more accurate information (by the favor of General Early, who was so kind as to send me his very interesting Memoirs), I wrote to the French editor, M. J. Dumaine, at Paris, begging him to omit at once the passage criticising General Early. I explained to him, that by a special study of the campaign between GeneralsGenerals Early and Sheridan, I had been convinced that I had been misled — that only the fearful odds against which Early fought had caused his want of success in the Valley Early fought had caused his want of success in the Valley — and that the conduct of the Southern troops had been misrepresented only by vague and uncertain rumors. But I did not even receive an answer to my letter, and wasl retained in the French translation. This is my excuse, and I hope that General Early--for whom I cherish the highest respect and veneration, and whose deeds hav
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), District of Columbia. (search)
shington......Feb. 4, 1861 Balloon ascension for military purposes made at Washington, and first telegraph message from a balloon sent by Mr. Lowe to President Lincoln......June 18, 1861 Congress emancipates all slaves, to be valued by commissioners and paid for at a maximum of $300......April 16, 1862 Collegiate department of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, known as the National Deaf-Mute College, the only one in the world, publicly opened......June 28, 1864 Gen. Jubal Early, Confederate, attacks Fort Stevens, 6 miles north of Washington, and is repulsed......July 12, 1864 President Lincoln assassinated in Ford's Theatre, Washington......April 14, 1865 Suffrage granted to colored citizens in the District......Jan. 8, 1867 The extensions of the Capitol finished......November, 1867 Howard University chartered......1867 Corcoran Art Gallery deeded to trustees by W. W. Corcoran, the founder......May 10, 1869 Congress repeals the charters of W
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
College of William and Mary becomes State Male Normal College by act approved......March 5, 1888 Jan. 19 (Gen. Robert E. Lee's birthday) made a legal holiday by legislature at session ending......March 1, 1890 Mercie's equestrian statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee unveiled at Richmond......May 29, 1890 Monument to the Confederate dead unveiled at Fredericksburg......June 10, 1891 Statue of Gen. Stonewall Jackson unveiled at Lexington; 15,000 Confederate veterans present; oration by General Early......July 21, 1891 Thomas W. Bocock, born in 1815, for fourteen years a Congressman and for four years speaker of the Confederate congress, dies in Appomattox county......Aug. 5, 1891 Appomattox Court-house building destroyed by fire......Feb. 3, 1892 Legislature ratifies a final settlement of the State debt with the bond-holders. Nineteen million dollars in bonds, to run 100 years, at 2 per cent. for ten years and 3 per cent. for ninety years, to be issued for the $28,000,00
f the Warrenton Pike, Evans's demibrigade of a regiment and a half, which formed the left of the Confederate army proper; Early's brigade of four regiments was drawn up in rear of Longstreet and Jones as a reserve. The above brigades, together withFord that they could not detect with glasses that Longstreet was there with his batteries and five infantry regiments and Early close behind with four more, yet such was the case. Tyler naturally ordered forward a battery and supported it by Rich Kirby Smith's Confederate brigade, which had come from the cars to that last battle scene, supported on his right by General Early. Some of our men had glimpses of bright bayonets a few hundred yards away above the low bushes. In front of them ro officers killed and seven wounded-total loss, 345. Smith's (or Elzey's) Confederate loss was 28 killed and 108 wounded; Early's, 24 killed and 122 wounded. Total killed and wounded in both brigades, 279. McDowell's entire Union loss was 481 off
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 15: the battle of Williamsburg (search)
left to right. While the operations just recounted were progressing under Heintzelman's eyes, Sumner and Keyes were trying to bring order out of confusion on the right of our line and back to the rear on the Yorktown road. A passageway across a stream and through the woods around the Confederate left flank having been discovered, Hancock's brigade, somewhat reinforced, was selected to make a turning movement, and its commander fought with it a brilliant and successful engagement against Early, who was badly wounded in this action. Hancock's victorious troops bivouacked on the field in a heavy rain. When this was going on beyond our extreme right, the enemy made strong counter attacks along the Yorktown road from the flanks of Fort Magruder. In resisting these attacks our men from New York and Pennsylvania received a heavy fire, and left many a poor fellow dead or dying upon a plowed field and among the felled timber which protected the fort. The whole conduct of this battle
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