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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
of the division, under General Winslow, was ordered to march by the most direct route to Atlanta, a regiment under Colonel Eggleston having been sent by rail to that place immediately after the receipt of the telegram just mentioned from General Shand endeavor to escape by marching to the westward through the hilly country of Northern Georgia. To prevent this, Colonel Eggleston was directed to watch the country in all directions from Atlanta. General A. J. Alexander, with the Second Brigade was directed to send a small party toward Talladega, by the route upon which he had marched from that place; while Colonel Eggleston was directed to send another party by rail to West Point. By these means it was believed that all considerable detd Griffin and Jonesboroa, closely watching the crossing of the Ocmulgee, and scouting the country to the eastward. Colonel Eggleston, commanding the post of Atlanta, had also sent a detachment to West Point, to watch the Alabama line in that quart
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
ation by higher officers and larger commands. By command of Major-General Buell. James B. Fry, Col. and Chief-of-Staff. General orders, no. 37headquarters, army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., August 1st, 1862. The major-general commanding has to announce other instances of disgracefulneglect and contrast them with another of gallantry: The guard at Courtland Bridge, consisting of companies A and H, 10th Kentucky, under the command of Captain Davidson, and a part of Captain Eggleston's company, 1st Ohio Cavalry, was completely surprised and captured with but trifling loss on the morning of the 25th ultimo, by a force of irregular cavalry. On the same day the companies of Captains Boyl and Goben, 10th Indiana, which were ordered to protect two bridges on the same road, respectively six and twelve miles east of Courtland, deemed it wiser to bring in an empty train which came up than to defend their posts, threatened with an attack from the same irregular cavalry; a
the purpose of having the legality of such imprisonment tried and determined in the Supreme Court of the United States. The next morning, Mr. Hoar called on Mr. Eggleston, who had been appointed to the same agency before him, and requested of him an introduction to the Mayor of Charleston, his object being to procure access to the records of orders or sentences, under which citizens of Massachusetts, it was understood, had been imprisoned. Mr. Eggleston acceded to his request, but said it would be best that he should first see the Mayor, and explain the matter in advance of the proposed introduction. Mr. Hoar assented, and Eggleston left Mr. H. waiting Eggleston left Mr. H. waiting in his office, while he proceeded to confer with the Mayor. After a considerable absence, he returned, and stated that the Mayor was at Columbia, attending the session of the Legislature, and that the gentleman who temporarily discharged the duties of the officer judged it best that all further proceedings should await his return.
Doc. 159.-the surrender at Courtland, Ala. Rebuke from General Buell. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., August 1. General orders, No. 37. the Major-General Commanding has to announce other instances of disgraceful neglect, and contrast them with another of gallantry. The guard at Courtland Bridge, consisting of companies A and H, Tenth Kentucky, under the command of Capt. Davidson, and a part of Capt. Eggleston's company, First Ohio cavalry, was completely surprised and captured, with but trifling loss, on the morning of the twenty-fifth ult., by a force of irregular cavalry. On the same day, the companies of Captains Boyle and Goben, Tenth Indiana, which were ordered to protect two bridges on the same road, respectively six and twelve miles east of Courtland, deemed it wiser to bring in an empty train which came up, than to defend their posts, threatened with an attack from the same irregular cavalry, and so put themselves on the train
son fought his guns with great precision. The muzzle of one of them was soon shot away; he continued, however, to fire it, though the woodwork around the port became ignited at each discharge. His buoyant and cheerful bearing and voice were contagious and inspiring. Lieutenant Wood handled his pivot gun admirably, and the executive officer testifies to his valuable suggestions during the action. His zeal and industry in drilling the crew contributed materially to our success. Lieutenant Eggleston served his hot shot and shell with judgment and effect; and his bearing was deliberate, and exerted a happy influence on his division. Lieutenant Butt fought his gun with activity, and during the action was gay and smiling. The marine corps was well represented by Captain Thom, whose tranquil mien gave evidence that the hottest fire was no novelty to him. One of his guns was served effectively and creditably by a detachment of the United Artillery, of Norfolk, under the command
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Hampton roads--Confederate official reports. (search)
on fought his guns with great precision. The muzzle of one of them was soon shot away; he continued, however, to fire it, though the wood work around the port became ignited at each discharge. His buoyant and cheerful bearing and voice were contagious and inspiring. Lieutenant Wood handled his pivot gun admirably, and the Executive Officer testifies to his valuable suggestions during the action. His zeal and industry in drilling the crew contributed materially to our success. Lieutenant Eggleston served his hot shot and shell with judgment and effect; and his bearing was deliberate, and exerted a happy influence on his division. Lieutenant Butt fought his gun with activity, and during the action was gay and smiling. The Marine Corps was well represented by Captain Thom, whose tranquil mien gave evidence that the hottest fire was no novelty to him. One of his guns was served effectively and creditably by a detachment of the United artillery of Norfolk, under the command o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Visit of a Confederate cavalryman to a Federal General's headquarters. (search)
th some friends. As he had got outside the Confederate lines he felt more independent, and before we reached Winchester he acted as if he were protecting me, and had become my safeguard. About the middle of the afternoon we came to the pickets, which we passed without any hindrance. They were just in the edge of the town, a cavalry vidette being on the hill north of them. I remember well that the Sixth Ohio (infantry) was on picket. I met many acquaintances, among them the Logans, Rev. Mr. Eggleston, of the Methodist Church, and the family of Dr. Murphy. We stopped only a few minutes in the town, that the doctor might buy a few cigars. On our way to General Piatt's Headquarters, we fell in with some mounted artillerymen, and it was amusing to see how anxious Dr. Franklin was to prevent their giving me any information, and how determined they seemed to tell all they knew. We soon reached General Piatt's Headquarters, which were to the left of the Martinsburg road, and distant
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
fire last night. Over two hundred old veterans, a number of members of the First Virginia regiment and many invited guests assembled at the Regimental Armory last evening to enjoy the banquet given by Lee and Pickett Camps in honor of the anniversary of the birth of the beloved General Robert E. Lee. After the battle of knives and forks had ceased the following toasts were responded to: The Day we Celebrate, Colonel A. S. Buford; The Legislature, Senator H. G. Peters; Pickett Camp, Dr. Eggleston; Lee Camp, Captain J. B. McKinney; Richmond, Hon. J. Taylor Ellyson; The Undying Fame of Lee was to have been responded to by Rev. Dr. M. D. Hoge, but he was unavoidably absent, consequently the speech was made in an excellent manner by Hon. F. R. Farrar. The Incomparable Infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia, Hon. J. M. Hudgins' of Caroline county; First Virginia Regiment, Colonel Henry C. Jones; songs by Captain Frank Cunningham; banjo and songs, Mr. Eugene Davis; First Regiment,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
ressing disasters. With such women to live for, even poverty and reconstruction could be endured. All honor to the women of the South, past and present—our mothers, our wives, our daughters—God bless them. God bless those here to-day, for it is mainly to their efforts that the shaft before us has been erected. Too much cannot be said in their praise. Where so many deserve it, it is invidious to call the names of any. Let me make an exception of one so advanced in age and honors as Mrs. Eggleston. She was one of the Mothers of the Confederacy, who had sons and grandsons in the army. She was one of the first presidents of this association. Much is due to the lamented Mrs. Wright, who cared for the neglected state of the graves, and had headboards put up. And to the present president, Mrs. Stevens, who has carried on the work to completion. All honor to the ladies of Vicksburg! Those who have nobly contributed their united efforts. We unveil it before them, and leave it in th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
blocks, ordnance equipment of every kind, and an ordnance laboratory. Commander Catesby Ap. R. Jones, (late executive officer of the Merrimac), at Selma, Ala., superintended the various branches of a foundry, and the manufacture of heavy guns, forty-seven of which were used in the defences of Mobile and Charleston. At Atlanta, Ga., Lieutenant D. P. McCorkle was in charge of ordnance works for the making of shot, shell, and gun carriages. Lieutenant Kennon (and, subsequently, Lieutenant Eggleston), at New Orleans, was engaged in the manufacture of fuses, primers, fireworks, cannon, gun carriages, projectiles, and ordnance of all kinds. At Petersburg the navy established a rope walk, substituting cotton for hemp, and supplied the navy, the army, coal mines, railroads, and canals. Zzznecessity for such industries. Such industries had to be established, for your necessities were great and urgent. Their proper conduct required skill and intelligence, and these officers
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