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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 81 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Doc. 49.-Colonel Elliott's expedition. General Pope's despatch. Halleck's headquarters, sent out on the twenty-eighth inst., under Col. Elliott, with the Second Iowa cavalry. After forced was lined with pickets for several days. Col. Elliott's command subsisted upon meat alone, such acessful in the highest degree, and entitles Col. Elliott and his command to high distinction. Its r on the Tuscumbia, Miss., June 1, 1862. Col. Elliott, with his cavalry, has returned, and given wish to give you a history of the doings of Col. Elliott's cavalry, which Gen. Pope sent, two days b of them bad erysipelas in its worst form. Col. Elliott immediately ordered the sick removed to a sorn, and went to their final settlement. Col. Elliott, not having any wagons with him for provisi movements from this arm of the service. Col. Elliott did not know Corinth was evacuated until he writing the above, I find a little error. Col. Elliott informs me that he lost one sergeant killed
he enemy, and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learned that Col. Elliott had cut the railroad on his line of retreat, he became frantic, and told his men to save themselves the best way they could. We have captured nine locomotivcommunicated to me the day before, and I had given in consequence all necessary orders; but a part of my forces passed Booneville an hour before the arrival of Col. Elliott's command, and the other part arrived just in time to drive it away, and liberate the convalescents captured; unfortunately, however, not in time to save four of the sick, who were barbarously consumed in the station-house. Let Col. Elliott's name descend to infamy as the author of such a revolting deed. Gen. Halleck did not capture nine locomotives. It was only by the accidental destruction of a bridge before some trains had passed that he got seven engines in a damaged condition, t
Doc. 76.-Colonel Elliott's expedition. New-York Tribune account. General Pope's headquaron the evening of the twenty-seventh ultimo Col. Elliott received orders to get his brigade, consistn, which was to take place the very morning Col. Elliott carried out his instructions at Booneville,recisely at midnight of the twenty-seventh. Col. Elliott, being perfectly ignorant of the roads and destroyed, when an order was received from Col. Elliott directing Col. Sheridan to join him at Boonnding, under the immediate supervision of Colonel Elliott, had entered the town, where they found oing any thing of the evacuation of Corinth, Col. Elliott had, indeed, wedged his command in between and more than he had been ordered to do, Colonel Elliott determined to make a retrograde movement upon the return march. Before setting out, Col. Elliott had become satisfied, by information obtainciency is principally due to the efforts of Col. Elliott, than whom a better cavalry officer can har
n of the ordnance in the burning cars, fired by Colonel Elliott at Booneville, that he pronounced it to be at C and was entirely voluntary and unasked for. Colonel Elliott arrived at Booneville on the thirtieth of May, revolving rifles. This was the only resistance Colonel Elliott encountered. He found in the town about eight The two thousand sick and convalescent found by Colonel Elliott were in the most shocking condition. The livine horrible scene could scarcely be imagined. Colonel Elliott set his own men to removing them to places of stic. The exact number of the cars destroyed by Colonel Elliott is as follows: Five cars loaded with small astores of every description. The nine men of Colonel Elliott's command taken prisoners were a party who had rs who were afraid to approach Booneville while Colonel Elliott was there. The charge of burning up five sick men in the depot and handing down Colonel Elliott's name to infamy, I must confess is only in character with
been ordered back from the first onset, was now in position to check this movement, and again the rebels were forced to retreat. Hardly had this movement failed, when I was apprised of an attempt to turn my left, and immediately despatched Capt. Elliott and his company to thwart it. During these shiftings of positions I could plainly see them caring for their dead and wounded, and removing them, but to what extent I have no means of telling. They now formed on their original line of battle, companies of his regiment, namely, company D, Captain Jesse Miller; company F, Lieutenant Chesebro; company H, Captain Christie; company G, Captain Partridge; and also parts of four companies of the Thirty-third Illinois, namely, company e, Captain Elliott; company K, Captain Nixon; company F, Captain Lawton; and company A, Captain Potter, who took charge, and one small rifled gun belonging to the First Indiana cavalry. The whole force numbered not over three hundred and fifty men. Colonel Ho
ght them in. In conclusion, I would beg leave to call the attention of the General Commanding to the services of Lieut. Henry H. Elliott, Ninth New-York volunteers, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant on General Williams's staff. Of his coolneerful and zealous services for the time I remained in command. I enclose copies of correspondence between myself and Lieut. Elliott. Col. McMillan, of the Twenty-first Indiana, has been unwell for some time. His counsel and advice have been freely Dudley. headquarters right wing Second brigade, Department of the Gulf, Baton Rouge, La., August 7, 1862. First Lieut. H. H. Elliott, A. A.A. G., Second Brigade: sir: I have the honor to enclose, for the information of the Commanding Officeretts battery; Sergeant Cheever and private Tyler, Ninth Connecticut. The following have honorable mention: Lieutenant H. H. Elliott, A. A.A. General to General Williams, for his coolness and intrepidity in action, and the promptness with which
and at times led them into the midst of the various actions in which we were engaged. It is saying little when I state that they were zealous, untiring, and efficient through the campaign. To Brig.-General Roberts, in particular, I am indebted for services marked throughout by skill, courage, and unerring judgment, and worthy of the solid reputation as a soldier he has acquired by many previous years of faithful and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Douglas Pope, Haight, Atcheson, De Kay, Piatt, Paine, Strother. Mr. McCain
and at times led them into the midst of the various actions in which we were engaged. It is saying little when I state that they were zealous, untiring, and efficient through the campaign. To Brig.-General Roberts, in particular, I am indebted for services marked throughout by skill, courage, and unerring judgment, and worthy of the solid reputation as a soldier he has acquired by many previous years of faithful and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Douglas Pope, Haight, Atcheson, De Kay, Piatt, Paine, Strother. Mr. McCain
Doc. 131.-operations in Alabama. General Halleck's despatch. Halleck's headquarters, June 4. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: General Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty miles south of Florence, pushing the enemy hard. He already reports ten thousand prisoners and deserters from the enemy, and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that, when Beauregard learned that Colonel Elliott had cut the railroad on his line of retreat, he became frantic, and told his men to save themselves the best way they could. We captured nine locomotives and a number of cars. One of the former is already repaired, and is running today. Several more will be in running order in a few days. The result is all that I could possibly desire. H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding.
rgh, but concealed from their view by a dense forest from the enemy's skirmishers, I have despatched some three hundred men, under Major Whitmore, of the Thirtieth Massachusetts, for picket and reconnoitring on that side of the town. In the next five or six days I hope to be in the possession of much information regarding the batteries, their approaches, and the forces in support. Respectfully, your obed't servant, T. Williams, Brigadier-General Volunteers Commanding. P. S.--Lieutenant Elliott's Brigade Quartermaster goes down for supplies, and can furnish details not given here. headquarters Second brigade, below Vicksburgh, July 6, 1862. Captain: The Tennessee left here last evening with the mail, but hearing the beating of drums at Grand Gulf, proceeded no further, and returned this evening for an additional gunboat to protect her in passing that point. Her return enabled me to supply an omission in my report of the fourth instant. It is that the eight long-ranged r
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