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The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 34 22 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 28 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 22 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders.. You can also browse the collection for Ellsworth or search for Ellsworth in all documents.

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ot. Seward's letter to the European Governments. Early action of England and France with respect to the war. Mr. Gregory's letter to the London times. Northern conceit about the war. prophecies of Northern journals. a three months war. Ellsworth and Billy Wilson. martial rage in the North. imperfect appreciation of the crisis in the South. Early ideas of the war at Montgomery. secret history of the Confederate Constitution. Southern opinion of Yankee soldiers. what was thought ofcessionist in the war. Such exhibitions of brutal ferocity were told with glee and devoured with unnatural satisfaction by the Northern people. If the rowdies were in constant scenes of disorder and violence before they were marched away — if Ellsworth's and Billy Wilson's men did knock down quiet citizens and plunder stores in New York and Washington, the story was merrily told even in the communities where these outrages were committed; for these displays were taken as proofs of desperate c
a sign for the enemy's attack. The flag could be seen from a window of the White House in Washington. As a company of Fire Zouaves, at the head of which was Col. Ellsworth, a protege of Mr. Lincoln, entered the town in the gray of the morning, their commander swore that he would have the flag as his especial prize. He was attenous ensign; but descending the ladder he found facing him a single man in his shirt sleeves, with a double-barrel gun in his hands. Here is my trophy, exclaimed Ellsworth, displaying the flag on his arm. And you are mine, replied Jackson, as he quickly raised his gun, and discharged its contents into the breast of the exultant Federal. Another moment and the brave Virginian was stretched by the side of his antagonist a lifeless corpse; for one of Ellsworth's men had sped a bullet through his brain, and another had thrust a bayonet into his breast as he was in the act of falling. In the low country of Virginia, in the vicinity of Fortress Monroe, an affa