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The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 34 22 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 28 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 22 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Ellsworth or search for Ellsworth in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

give to the runaway negroes; sends them back to their owners, or harnesses them to carts at work in his fortifications, and treats them with liberal doses of the lash. No, no, abolitionism is no part of their purpose; they pray us to believe that much. We take them at their word; it is no part of their purpose. Their hue and cry against the South on that subject was all for Buncombe. Mrs. Harriet Stowe is no longer their prophet; nor Ward Beecher their brother of a prophet. Butler and Ellsworth and Billy Wilson, are their new divinities; Garrison, Phillips, and the John Browns, give out that they are not interested in this fight, which is not for the slave, but for trade. It is a war waged for precisely the objects which inspired the Tories in the Revolution; a war of subjugation; a war to perpetuate the exaction of tribute; a war against the right of self-government; a war intended to crush out all the attributes of nationality belonging of right to the colonies of the Sout
Col. Ellsworth engaged to be Married. --The New York Herald says: "Col. Ellsworth has been engaged for the last two years to Miss Carrie Spafford, a young lady of seventeen, the daughter of Charles F. Spafford, a resident of Rockport, Ill. Miss Spafford was recently a student to the Carroll Institute, Brooklyn. The maCol. Ellsworth has been engaged for the last two years to Miss Carrie Spafford, a young lady of seventeen, the daughter of Charles F. Spafford, a resident of Rockport, Ill. Miss Spafford was recently a student to the Carroll Institute, Brooklyn. The marriage would probably have taken place ere this but for the breaking out of the war. Col. Ellsworth was twenty-seven years of age." to Miss Carrie Spafford, a young lady of seventeen, the daughter of Charles F. Spafford, a resident of Rockport, Ill. Miss Spafford was recently a student to the Carroll Institute, Brooklyn. The marriage would probably have taken place ere this but for the breaking out of the war. Col. Ellsworth was twenty-seven years of age."
rbor, (which vessel arrived here after the steamship Niagara had been off this port, and while the entrance to the harbor was unobstructed,) could load for a place in Europe, and the permission was refused, and he was informed that the Bark could only be allowed to depart in ballast, and even that much was perhaps more than orders justified. The officers made enquiry about the state of feeling here; if any action had taken place in Virginia since the occupation of Alexandria; spoke of Ellsworth's death, and wanted to know the price of provisions in Charleston. Their position in reference to the seceded States was regretted. They spoke friendly, and hoped the difficulties of the country would soon be settled. The ship A & A was spoken off, and some surprise apparently exhibited that she should have been allowed to depart. This vessel, it will be remembered, came into port while the Niagara was off here. The schooner seen near the steamer yesterday turns out to be a vessel
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], Daring Robbery in Memphis, Tennessee (search)
eir loved State. Captain Christian commands the Cavalry, Capt.--the Second Rifles. Our men are all anxious to see the soil of Virginia rid of the tramp of the despicable minions of Abe.--They desire to free "the land of the free and home of the brave" from such dishonor. We do not desire even to welcome them to hospitable graves upon our soil, alongside of the slumbering ashes of our sires and mighty dead. We prefer that they shall be embalmed in the abominable hole of Washington, a la Ellsworth. Much admiration is expressed among us for the character and spirit of the noble Jackson. We firmly believe that there are thousands of Jacksons in the South, who will sell their lives equally dear. We some what expect a sham attack upon our river, (Rappahannock,) but all seem to wish only a "trial of their pieces." The citizens of Middlesex, with their usual hospitality, are busy in attending to the soldiers, in the way of extras, some bringing lamb, some butter, &c., &c. To