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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sclopis, Paul Frederick de Salerno, Count 1789-1878 (search)
Senate, of which he was president until that principality was merged into the kingdom of Italy, in 1861, when he held the same office in the Italian Senate. At about that time he became president of the Turin Academy of Sciences; and in 1868 Victor Emanuel bestowed upon him the order of Annunziata, the highest of the kingdom. When, in 1871, Victor Emanuel was asked to appoint an arbitrator for the tribunal, at Geneva, to decide upon the claims growing out of the devastations committed by the ctor Emanuel bestowed upon him the order of Annunziata, the highest of the kingdom. When, in 1871, Victor Emanuel was asked to appoint an arbitrator for the tribunal, at Geneva, to decide upon the claims growing out of the devastations committed by the cruiser Alabama, he selected Count Sclopis, and he was chosen by his colleagues president of the tribunal. For his services. on that occasion, the United States government presented him a service of silverplate. He died in Turin, March 8, 1878.
tes on the one hand, or the States calling themselves the Confederate States on the other, both of which parties are recognized by the proclamation as belligerents. The British government is accustomed to preserve an attitude of neutrality towards contending nations; but it would seem that neutrality does not so far interfere with the sympathies and freedom of its subjects as to compel it to issue proclamations against Irishmen enlisting with Francis Joseph, or Englishmen fighting for Victor Emanuel and Garibaldi. The proclamation in this case is so warmly eulogized by the British press as precisely the proclamation demanded by the crisis, they profess such profound astonishment that the American people are not satisfied with it, and rate so severely Mr. Cassius M. Clay for expressing with Western bluntness his frank surprise, that I will dwell for a moment on what seems to be its meaning and effect. What has the proclamation effected? How did we stand before it was issued, a
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Leaves from a Roman diary: February, 1869 (Rewritten in 1897) (search)
ternich, to introduce reforms in the states of the Church. The Revolution of 1848 followed too quickly, and the extravagant proceedings of Mazzini and Garibaldi drove him into the ranks of the conservatives, where he has remained ever since. Carlyle compared him to a man who had an old tin-kettle which he thought he would mend, but as soon as he began to tinker it the thing went to pieces in his hands. The Revolution of 1848 proved an unpractical experiment, but it opened the way for Victor Emanuel and a more sound liberalism in 1859. We attended service at the Sistine Chapel yesterday in company with two young ladies from Philadelphia, who wore long black veils so that Pius IX. might not catch the least glimpse of their pretty faces. I was disappointed in my hope of obtaining a view of the Pope's face. Cardinal Bonaparte sat just in front of us, a man well worth observing. He looks to be the ablest living member of that family, and bears a decided resemblance to the old Nap
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Eugenie, Empress of the French. (search)
ly, Don't cry, don't cry; he will soon come back again. A sturdy man endeavored to add to the words of solace as he leaned his head into the carriage, saying tenderly to the empress, Don't cry; we will take care of you and the boy. At the station of the Lyons railroad many of the cabinet ministers and a large number of distinguished members of the court, gentlemen and ladies, were present. Prince Napoleon, son of Jerome, was there with his young bride, Princess Clotilde, daughter of Victor Emanuel. The Princess Matilda, Prince and Princess Murat were also there. It was a touching scene, writes Julie de Marguerittes; the waiting-room crowded with mothers, wives, sisters, and friends,--tears and sobs making their way spite of imperial example, spite of court etiquette. At length the moment of departure arrived. The emperor again embraced the empress and entered the car amidst the deafening shouts of enthusiasm. All was ready. The chief director went up to the imperial
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
ith her; though I can do so little for her, she is doing very much for me. This was a season of extraordinary interest to one who had always loved Italy and pleaded for a generous policy toward her. Early in January it became known that King Victor Emanuel was dying. At the Vatican his life-long adversary Pius IX was wasting away with a mortal disease. It was a time of suspense. The two had fought a long and obstinate duel: which of them, people asked, would yield first to the conqueror oiculty in getting in. Sat on carpeted stair near Mrs. Carson. Queen came at two in the afternoon. Sat in a loggia ornamented with red velvet and gold. Her entrance much applauded. With her the little Prince of Naples, The present King, Victor Emanuel III. her son; the Queen of Portugal, her sister-in-law; and Prince of Portugal, son of the latter. The King entered soon after twohe took the oath standing bareheaded, then signed some record of it. The oath was then administered to Prince
, 42. Vendome, II, 62. Venice, I, 278; II, 27. Ventura, II, 136. Ventura, Sig., II, 82. Vergniaud, P. V., I, 7. Vermont, I, 118; II, 68. Verona, I, 278; II, 26, 27. Versailles, I, 8, 309. Vibbert, G. H., I, 364. Victor Emanuel I, II, 28-30. Victor Emanuel II, II, 30, 278. Victoria, Queen, I, 267; II, 20, 127, 218, 283. Victoria, Empress (Frederick), II, 20. Victory, Temple of, I, 274. Vienna, I, 94; II, 182. Villegas, Jose, II, 240, 243, 256. VVictor Emanuel II, II, 30, 278. Victoria, Queen, I, 267; II, 20, 127, 218, 283. Victoria, Empress (Frederick), II, 20. Victory, Temple of, I, 274. Vienna, I, 94; II, 182. Villegas, Jose, II, 240, 243, 256. Vincent Hospital, II, 158. Vineyard Haven, I, 342, 387. Vinton, Mr., II, 287. Virginia, I, 29. Viti de Marco, Marchesa de, II, 255. Viti de Marco, Marchese de, II, 255. Voickoff, Alex, I, 350. Voshell, Lucy, II, 344, 345, 347. Waddington, Mary K., II, 9. Waddington, William, II, 9. Wade, Benjamin, I, 321. Wadsworth, William, I, 86. Wagner, Richard, II, 156. Wales, I, 88; II, 166. Walker, Francis, II, 150, 172, 226. Wallace, H. B., I, 134, 271. Walla
The world Does move. --Here are a few curious points in the news by the Asia: Universal suffrage is given to the people of Naples. They are requested to vote by ballot, yea or nay, upon the question of a union of all the Italian States, with Victor Emanuel as constitutional king. A serious proposition is made to the Pope to sell out or commute. An attempt is being made to carry out About's idea of a palace and a garden for the Holy Father. One of the old Bourbons writes to the London Times and claims the throne of Spain. A Bourbon appealing to the world through a free press is one of the wonders of the age. Garibaldi takes a railway train as a conveyance to the scene where he fights against another Bourbon, and opposes a Colt's revolver to the old-fashioned stiletto.
nized by France, she would probably be restored, to avoid disagreeable consequences. The Turin Gazette says Prussia has simply made some remarks against the entry of Sardinian troops into Naples, but made no communication. It was reported, however, via Berlin, that the Russian ambassador at Turin had been recalled, and that the Sardinian ambassador at St. Petersburg had received his passports. It was stated that 1,400 Piedmontese troops had already reached Naples by sea. After Victor Emanuel reviews them, they will march to Caserta to be joined by those entering by the Roman frontier. The abolition of the Hanover Stadt dues is on the eve of settlement. The sums to be paid Havana is 460,000. England and Hambourg pay £153,000 each, and the remainder by the other States Interested. Count Persigny, the French Minister at London, had been recalled to Paris, and it was reported that he would succeed Thouvenal in the Cabinet. The French bishops and clergy continue a
est dates. The King of Naples had issued a protest, declaring he would consider the voting null and void. A Naples dispatch of the 21st says that Garibaldi has officially declared he would lay down the Dictatorship on the arrival of Victor Emanuel. The head of General Cialdini's columns encountered and beat a corps of Neapolitans at Isernia. The General commanding the corps, with his officers and 800 soldiers and flag, were taken. Another dispatch says that Cialdini's captured a portion of the Neapolitan artillery. Victor Emanuel arrived at Salonia on the 21st of October. It was reported that provisions were beginning to fail at Greta. The Piedmontese troops were encamped at Rieti, ten leagues from Rome. The text of the Prussian dispatch relative to the invasion of the Papal States is published. It censures the action of Sardinia and rejects. Cavour's justification, but does not threaten any active hostility on the part of Prussia. The Au
must think me very simple to have come here without the Emperor's permission. It was I who settled the campaign with him at Chamber, and his last recommendation was that if the matter was to be done let it be done quickly." In a letter which Victor Emanuel wrote a short time since to the King of Naples at Gaeta, he said, speaking of Garibaldi, "try to beat him; try to catch him, and, above all, hang him!" The correspondent is assured that the King of Naples repeated these words to a great persoEmanuel wrote a short time since to the King of Naples at Gaeta, he said, speaking of Garibaldi, "try to beat him; try to catch him, and, above all, hang him!" The correspondent is assured that the King of Naples repeated these words to a great personage now or lately at Gaeta. With all this, Victor Emanuel and Garibaldi will probably be the best friends in the world when they meet; but the "Re Galantuomo" occasionally passes through phases of temper not quite in keeping with his designation.
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