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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 210 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 190 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 146 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 138 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 96 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 84 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 68 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 64 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 57 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 55 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Ralph Waldo Emerson or search for Ralph Waldo Emerson in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
established by the Radicals, to show that they were at least not ignorant of literature. Parkes wrote the articles on the prose writings of Milton. He is a subscriber to the North American, and has been much pleased with the article in a late number (for July, I think) on Milton. He thinks it the best essay on Milton ever written, and is anxious to know who is the author. I have felt ashamed that I cannot tell. Do not fail to let me know. July, 1838, Vol. XLVII. pp. 56-73. By Ralph Waldo Emerson. Jan. 27, 1839. Among the persons whom I have seen since I wrote the foregoing pages have been Leigh Hunt 1784-1859. and Thomas Campbell. 1777-1844. I yesterday morning saw Leigh Hunt, on the introduction of Carlyle. He lives far from town,—in Chelsea,—in a humble house, with uncarpeted entry and stairs. He lives more simply, I think, than any person I have visited in England; but he possesses a palace of a mind. He is truly brilliant in conversation, and the little no
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
ve to the British International Copyright Bill. Do write me about this measure, and what its chances are. You have read the Retrospective Review. I am indebted to it for much pleasure and instruction. What was my gratification, a short time since, while dining with Parkes, to find that it was gotten up and carried on by my friends. The nominal editor was Southern, now Secretary of Legation at Madrid; but its chief supporters were Parkes and Charles Austin and Montagu. It was established by the Radicals, to show that they were at least not ignorant of literature. Parkes wrote the articles on the prose writings of Milton. He is a subscriber to the North American, and has been much pleased with the article in a late number (for July, I think) on Milton. He thinks it the best essay on Milton ever written, and is anxious to know who is the author. I have felt ashamed that I cannot tell. Do not fail to let me know. July, 1838, Vol. XLVII. pp. 56-73. By Ralph Waldo Emerson.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating Macaulay's or Dr. Channing's. Parkes wishes me to take to Emerson the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons passing through that city. One of these was the Earl of S
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating Macaulay's or Dr. Channing's. Parkes wishes me to take to Emerson the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons passing through that city. One of these was the Earl of S
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
ancaster with Felton, whose family was passing some weeks in that interior town, and dined with Emerson at Concord, on his way home. With Dr. Lieber, who made a visit to Boston, he had long talks abme acquainted. Those mentioned are Story, Channing, Allston, Bancroft, Ticknor, Longfellow, R. W. Emerson, and Prescott.—Speeches, Lectures, and Poems of the Earl of Carlisle, p. 393. In a preface trday, in a gig, we went to Lancaster. En routeto Cambridge, dined with Ralph Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, living at Concord. whom we found very agreeable and sensible. He did not lead out his wtter from Carlyle, over whom the fancy to come to America had again driven. He will not come. Emerson has two delightful children,—a girl and boy. The girl he calls his honeycomb. Come back stauncl, A magazine, the organ of the Transcendentalists, of which Margaret Fuller, assisted by R. W. Emerson and George Ripley, was the editor. Its first number was issued in April, 1840, and its last