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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 68 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Inside Sumter: in 1861. (search)
r, plan as we may, much depends upon accident, and the moral effect of very insignificant incidents is often considerable. For this reason Wittyman's masterpiece deserves to be mentioned. Wittyman was a German carpenter, not very familiar with English, and wholly ignorant of military engineering. His captain had conceived the idea that a cheval-de-frise across the riprapping at the salient angles of the fort would confine the enemy on whatever face he landed until he had been treated liberal been a trifle higher it would have entered the embrasure. The first night of the bombardment was one of great anxiety. The fleet might send reenforcements; the enemy might attempt an assault. Both would come in boats; both would answer in English. It would be horrible to fire upon friends; it would be fatal not to fire upon enemies. The night was dark and chilly. Shells were dropping into the fort at regular intervals, and the men were tired, hungry, and out of temper. Any party that
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Virginia scenes in 1861. (search)
we did upon ground likely to be in the track of armies gathering to confront each other, it was deemed advisable to send the children and young girls into a place more remote from chances of danger. Some weeks later the heads of the household, two widowed sisters whose sons were at Manassas, drove away from their home in their carriage at early morning, having spent the previous night in company with a half-grown lad digging in the cellar hasty graves for the interment of two boxes of old English silver-ware, heirlooms in the family, for which there was no time to provide otherwise. Although the enemy were long encamped immediately above it after the house was burnt the following year, this silver was found there when the war had ended; it was lying lose in the earth, the boxes having rotted away. The point at which our family reunited within the Confederate lines was Bristoe, the station next beyond Manassas, a cheerless railway inn; a part of the premises was used as a countr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.65 (search)
1st Session, 37th Congress, pp. 205, 344). It became a law August 3d.-editors. at Willard's Hotel in Washington, D. C., the draft of a bill which you desired Congress should pass, in reference to obtaining some kind of iron-clad vessels to meet the formidable preparations the Rebels were making at Norfolk, Mobile, and New Orleans. At that time you stated that you had already called the attention of Congress to this matter, but without effect. I presented this bill to the Honorable James E. English, member of Congress from my district, who fortunately was on the Naval Committee and untiringly urged the matter on their attention. The chairman of the committee, A. H. Rice, of Massachusetts, As Mr. Welles points out in his letter (see below), this was an error of Mr. Bushnell's. The chairman of the Naval Committee was Charles B. Sedgwick. of Syracuse, New York. Mr. Rice came second on the committee.--editors. also cooperated most heartily, so that in about thirty days, The t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
her commander was Lieutenant W. A. Webb, formerly of the National Navy, who had a crew of one hundred and sixty men. The Atlanta was 190 feet in length, and 40 in width. Her main deck was only a few inches above the water. From this rose her gun-deck 8 feet, sloping at an angle of about 80 degrees, leaving a fiat surface on the top. She was heavily plated with strips of iron two and a half inches in thickness, covering thick oak and pine planking. She was armed with four of Brooke's (English) rifled cannon, whose projectiles were steel-pointed, and at her bow was an iron beak six feet in length, to which was suspended a submarine torpedo, charged with 50 pounds of gunpowder, for blowing up any vessel she might attack. Deserters from the Atlanta reported her ready for work, and Admiral Dupont sent the Weehawken, Captain Rodgers, and Nahant, Commander Downes, to Wassaw Sound, to watch her. She was considered by her commander a match for both, and on the morning of the 17th of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
G. W. Nesmith. Pennsylvania.--Charles R. Buckalew, Edward Cowan. Rhode Island.--William Sprague, Henry B. Anthony. Vermont.--Solomon Foot, Jacob Collamer. Virginia.--John S. Carlile. West Virginia.--Waitman T. Willey, P. G. Van Winkle. Wisconsin.--James R. Doolittle, Timothy O. Howe. Hannibal Hamlin, Vice-President of the Republic and President of the Senate. House of Representatives. California.--Thomas B. Shannon, William Higbee, Cornelius Cole. Connecticut.--Henry C. Deming, James E. English, Augustus Brandegee, John H. Hubbard. Delaware.--Nathaniel B. Smithers. Illinois.--Isaac N. Arnold, John F. Farnsworth, Elihu B. Washburne, Charles M. Harris, Owen Lovejoy, Jesse O. Norton, John R. Eden, John T. Stuart, Lewis W. Ross, A. L. Knapp, J. C. Robinson, William R. Morrison, William J. Allen, James C. Allen. Indiana.--John Law, James A. Cravens, H. W. Harrington, William S. Holman, George W. Julian, Ebenezer Dumont, Daniel W. Voorhees, Godlove S. Orth, Schuyler Colfax, J. K. Ed
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
e vote: yeas.--Maine--Blair, Perham, Pike, Rice; New Hampshire--Patterson, Rollins; Massachusetts--Alley, Ames, Baldwin, Boutwell, Dawes, Elliott, Gooch, Hooper, Rice, W. D. Washburn; Rhode Island--Dixon, Jenckes; Connecticut--Brandegee, Deming, English, Hubbard; Vermont--Baxter, Morrill, Woodbridge; New York--A. W. Clark, Freeman Clark, Davis, Frank, Ganson, Griswold, Herrick, Hotchkiss, Hulburd, Kellogg, Littlejohn, Marvin, Miller, Morris, Nelson, Odell, Pomeroy, Radford, Steele, Van Valkenbuhe scene. Senators, Cabinet officers, Judges of the Supreme Court, and even strangers, crowding on to the floor of the House, watched its proceedings with absorbing interest. During the roll-call, the vote of Speaker Colfax, and the votes of Mr. English, Mr. Ganson and Mr. Baldwin, which assured success, were warmly applauded by the Republican side. And when the Speaker declared that the constitutional majority of two-thirds having voted in the affirmative, the Joint Resolution was passed, t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Lyman, 1835- (search)
to have established such relations with Great Britain that she would be our natural friend, would give to us her moral support, and would, perhaps, in case of exigency, lend support that would be more than moral. I am not considering in this article the practicability of such a relationship. I do not stop to discuss the question whether Great Britain would be likely to enter into it with us, or whether we should be likely to enter into it with Great Britain. Writing for American, not for English, readers,. I do not attempt to point out the advantages to Great Britain as well as to ourselves. My object is simply to show that there would be a. real, a tangible, a practical advantage, one that can he measured in dollars and cents, in the establishment of such relationship between these two great Anglo-Saxon communities, that they would be recognized by the civilized world as standing together in amity, making a common cause, not against the rest of the world, but in favor of one prin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barclay, Robert, 1648-1690 (search)
Barclay, Robert, 1648-1690 Author; born in Gordonston, Scotland, Dec. 23, 1648. At the age of nineteen, he embraced the principles of the Society of Friends. In 1670 he vindicated them from false charges in a pamphlet entitled Truth cleared of calumnies. He also published, in Latin and English, An apology for the true Christian Divinity, as the same is held forth and preached by the people called, in scorn, Quakers. Barclay dedicated it to King Charles, with great modesty and independence, and it was one of the ablest defences of the doctrines of his sect. His writings attracted public sympathy to his co-religionists. The first remonstrance of Friends against war was put forth by Barclay in 1677, entitled a Treatise on universal love. Barclay made many religious journeys in England, Holland, and Germany with William Penn, and was several times imprisoned on account of the promulgation of his doctrines. Charles II. was Barclay's friend through the influence of Penn, and m
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bayard, Nicholas, 1644-1707 (search)
Bayard, Nicholas, 1644-1707 Colonial executive; born in Alphen, Holland, in 1644. His mother was a sister of Governor Stuyvesant, the last Dutch governor of New Netherland, whom she accompanied to America in 1647, with her three sons and a daughter. The old Bayard mansion in New York City, on the Bowery, was converted into a pleasure garden in 1798. The Astor Library is built on a part of the estate. Under the second English regime, in 1685, Bayard was mayor of New York, and a member of Governor Dongan's council. In 1698 Col. Bayard went to England to clear himself of the imputation of complicity in the piracy of Captain Kidd, having been accused by the Leisler faction of both piracy and a scheme to introduce slavery. He was tried before Chief-Justice Atwood and sentenced to death. The proceedings, however, were annulled by an order-in-council, and he was reinstated in his property and honors. He died in New York City, in 1707.
n 1663. A German edition of the Bible, in quarto, was printed at Germantown, near Philadelphia, in 1743, by Christopher Saner. In 1782 Robert Aitkin, printer and bookseller in Philadelphia, published the first American edition of the Bible in English, also in quarto form; and in 1791 Isaiah Thomas printed the Bible in English, in folio form, at Woreester. Mass. This was the first in that form issued from the press in the United States. The same year Isaac Collins printed the English versiole, in quarto, was printed at Germantown, near Philadelphia, in 1743, by Christopher Saner. In 1782 Robert Aitkin, printer and bookseller in Philadelphia, published the first American edition of the Bible in English, also in quarto form; and in 1791 Isaiah Thomas printed the Bible in English, in folio form, at Woreester. Mass. This was the first in that form issued from the press in the United States. The same year Isaac Collins printed the English version, in quarto form, at Trenton, N. J.
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