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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 42 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 38 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 27 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for English or search for English in all documents.

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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
ng drawing his vital breath upon this soil, whatever may be his condition, and whoever may be his parents. He may be poor, weak, humble, black—he may be of Caucasian, of Jewish, of Indian, or of Ethiopian race—he may be of French, of German, of English, of Irish extraction—but before the Constitution of Massachusetts all these distinctions disappear. He is not poor, or weak, or humble, or black—nor Caucasian, nor Jew, nor Indian, nor Ethiopian—nor French, nor German, nor English, nor Irish; hEnglish, nor Irish; he is a man,—the equal of all his fellow-men. He is one of the children of the State, which, like an impartial parent, regards all its offspring with an equal care. To some it may justly allot higher duties, according to their higher capacities, but it welcomes all to its equal, hospitable board. The State, imitating the divine justice, is no respecter of persons. II. I now pass to the second stage of this argument, and ask attention to a further proposition. The Legislature of Mass
ng drawing his vital breath upon this soil, whatever may be his condition, and whoever may be his parents. He may be poor, weak, humble, black—he may be of Caucasian, of Jewish, of Indian, or of Ethiopian race—he may be of French, of German, of English, of Irish extraction—but before the Constitution of Massachusetts all these distinctions disappear. He is not poor, or weak, or humble, or black—nor Caucasian, nor Jew, nor Indian, nor Ethiopian—nor French, nor German, nor English, nor Irish; hEnglish, nor Irish; he is a man,—the equal of all his fellow-men. He is one of the children of the State, which, like an impartial parent, regards all its offspring with an equal care. To some it may justly allot higher duties, according to their higher capacities, but it welcomes all to its equal, hospitable board. The State, imitating the divine justice, is no respecter of persons. II. I now pass to the second stage of this argument, and ask attention to a further proposition. The Legislature of Mass
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
t was ever to be required. Commissioners were appointed by the three governments, and diplomatic intercourse was at once instituted. On the arrival of the Minister of the Republic of Hayti, I sought an early opportunity of making his acquaintance; and with a letter of introduction from Mr. Sumner I called at his residence, which had been just prepared for the reception of himself and family. I was politely received by his secretary,—a handsome and gentlemanly young man—who said in fine English, The minister will soon come in. He does not speak English well, but of course you are so recently from Europe you must speak French and Italian—one of which is his mother tongue, and the other his favorite. I was glad, for it happened also to be mine. In a moment the gentleman entered with Mr. Sumner's letter in one hand, and taking mine warmly with the other, led me to a sofa. In my Note-book of the War Ms., I fined the following entry: I passed a most charming evening with the Ha<
t was ever to be required. Commissioners were appointed by the three governments, and diplomatic intercourse was at once instituted. On the arrival of the Minister of the Republic of Hayti, I sought an early opportunity of making his acquaintance; and with a letter of introduction from Mr. Sumner I called at his residence, which had been just prepared for the reception of himself and family. I was politely received by his secretary,—a handsome and gentlemanly young man—who said in fine English, The minister will soon come in. He does not speak English well, but of course you are so recently from Europe you must speak French and Italian—one of which is his mother tongue, and the other his favorite. I was glad, for it happened also to be mine. In a moment the gentleman entered with Mr. Sumner's letter in one hand, and taking mine warmly with the other, led me to a sofa. In my Note-book of the War Ms., I fined the following entry: I passed a most charming evening with the Ha<
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Ninth: Emancipation of the African race. (search)
e would be taken on that day. The nation, realizing the transcendent magnitude of the issue, awaited the result with profound anxiety. The galleries, and the avenues leading to them, were early thronged by a dense mass intensely anxious to witness the scene. Senators, Cabinet officers, Judges of the Supreme Court, and even strangers, crowding on to the floor of the House, watched its proceedings with absorbing interest. During the roll-call, the vote of Speaker Colfax, and the votes of Mr. English, Mr. Ganson, and Mr. Baldwin, with assured success, were warmly applauded by the Republican side. And when the Speaker declared, that, the Constitutional majority of two-thirds having voted in the affirmative, the joint resolution was passed, the announcement was received by the House and the spectators on the floor with a wild outburst of enthusiastic applause. The Republican members instantly sprang to their feet, and applauded with cheers and clapping of hands. The spectators in the
e would be taken on that day. The nation, realizing the transcendent magnitude of the issue, awaited the result with profound anxiety. The galleries, and the avenues leading to them, were early thronged by a dense mass intensely anxious to witness the scene. Senators, Cabinet officers, Judges of the Supreme Court, and even strangers, crowding on to the floor of the House, watched its proceedings with absorbing interest. During the roll-call, the vote of Speaker Colfax, and the votes of Mr. English, Mr. Ganson, and Mr. Baldwin, with assured success, were warmly applauded by the Republican side. And when the Speaker declared, that, the Constitutional majority of two-thirds having voted in the affirmative, the joint resolution was passed, the announcement was received by the House and the spectators on the floor with a wild outburst of enthusiastic applause. The Republican members instantly sprang to their feet, and applauded with cheers and clapping of hands. The spectators in the