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parts of solid earth. About three thousand wounded are to be found in the hospitals. About four hundred and fifty have been buried by the rebels. Among the principal sufferers are General Green, who was killed, General Baldwin wounded, Colonel Erwin killed, Major Hoadley killed, Lieutenant-Colonel Griffin killed. Of the citizens, Mike Donovan wounded, and the following ladies: Mrs. Cisco killed, Mrs. C. W. Peters killed, Mrs. Major T. B. Reed, Mrs. W. S. Hazard, Mrs. W. H. Clements, M. The explosion was terrific. They then attempted to mount our works, but were kept back. The firing was confined mostly to small arms, which was very heavy. Continued all night; we were up with arms in hand, and without sleep all night. Colonel Erwin killed; also Lieutenant W. S. Lipscomb, Viers, J. M. Good, Alf. Eaton, D. S. Lipscomb, and George N. Ferrel, wounded. Jack Satterwhite, slightly. The hand-grenades thrown by the enemy were very destructive. Twenty-four killed and wounded i
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
night dug rifle pits all along the new line. On the morning of the 30th the division entered Corinth, as I have reported on a former occasion. I have to regret the loss of the services of one of the best officers of my division, namely, Captain Erwin, Sixth Ohio Volunteers, who was shot through the chest at 6 o'clock by the last fire of the enemy's picket as we were moving into the lines of Corinth. The cavalry of my division ran onto the enemy's rear about 3{ miles beyond Corinth. I sey, at daylight, several loud explosions occurred in our front. The skirmishers were thrown forward, and Corinth was ours. I regret to say that the last shot fired by the retreating rebels hit and seriously wounded my most efficient officer, Captain Erwin, of Company E, then commanding his company as skirmishers. Our brigade followed their skirmishers, and was the first Federal force inside the works of Corinth. Respectfully, N. L. Anderson, lieutenant--olonel, ommanding Sixth Ohio Vo
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. (search)
as found in the Confederate archives as accompanying document to Colonel Claiborne's report of the affair. See p 879. Spring Creek, Tenn., May 9, 1862. The command started under the command of Major Shaeffer [de Boernstein] (130 men strong), on May 2, toward Paris, where we were delayed until late in the afternoon of the 3d by shoeing the horses. Heavy rain was the reason we started on the 4th from Paris toward Como (13 miles), and passed the night 3 miles farther, at the farm of Mr. Erwin. There a report was made by a citizen coming from Caledonia that a large force of Confederate cavalry had passed, going toward Paris, which induced Major Shaeffer [de Boernstein] to go to Dresden and possibly toward Mayfield and Hickman. We made a night march on a very dark and stormy night, and reached Dresden at about 1 a. m. Pickets were sent out toward Como, which reported (very late) that the enemy had his pickets at our last camping place-Erwin's farm. We left Dresden at 1 p. m
ge, February 13, 1843. May dear Sir:--Yours of the 23d ultimo has been received, and with it The Madisonian, containing Gov. Gilmer's letter on the subject of the annexation of Texas to the United States. You are not mistaken in supposing that I have formed an opinion on this interesting subject. It occupied much of my time during my Presidency, and, I am sure, has lost none of its importance by what has since transpired. Soon after my election in 1829, it was made known to me by Mr. Erwin, formerly our minister to the Court of Madrid, that, whilst at that Court, he had laid the foundation of a treaty with Spain for the cession of the Floridas and the settlement of the boundary of Louisiana, fixing the western limit of the latter at the Rio Grande, agreeably to the understanding of France; that he had written home to our Government for powers to complete and sign this negotiation; but that, instead of receiving such authority, the negotiation was taken out of his hands and t
Auld, 1750; Austin, 1752. Bacon, 1749; Bailey, 1806; Ballard, 1721: Binford, 1757; Blodgett, 1752; Blunt, 1748; Boutwell, 1753; Bradish, 1745; Brattle, 1747; Bucknam, 1766; Budge, 1762; Burdit, 1761; Burns, 1751; Bushby, 1735; Butterfield, 1785. Calif, 1750; Chadwick, 1756; Cook, 1757; Cousins, 1755; Crease, 1757; Crowell, 1752. Davis, 1804; Degrusha, 1744; Dexter, 1767; Dill, 1734; Dixon, 1758; Dodge, 1749; Durant, 1787. Earl, 1781; Easterbrook, 1787; Eaton, 1755; Edwards, 1753; Erwin, 1752. Farrington, 1788; Faulkner, 1761; Fessenden, 1785; Fitch, 1785; Floyd, 1750; Fowle, 1752; French, 1755. Galt, 1757; Gardner, 1721; Garret, 1732; Giles, 1719; Gill, 1738; Goddard, 1745; Gowen, 1773; Grace, 1779; Greatton, 1718; Green, 1785. Hosmer, 1746; Hunt, 1751. Kendall, 1752; Kettle, or Kettell, 1740. Lathe, Laithe, and Leathe, 1738; Learned, 1793; Le Bosquet, 1781. Mack, 1790; Mallard, 1753; Mansfield, 1759; May, 1759; MacCarthy, 1747; MacClinton, 1750; Mead, 17
ender. It remains now only to consider the final campaign in North Carolina. Toward the close of 1864, Gen. J. G. Martin had been recalled from the Virginia army and placed in command of the Western department of North Carolina, with headquarters at Asheville. Under his command were, according to Martin's return, March 10th, the following troops: Col. J. B. Palmer's brigade, embracing the Sixty-second, Sixty-fourth and Sixty-ninth (?) North Carolina regiments; Macbeth's light artillery; Erwin's battalion of Senior reserves; Thomas' legion (Love's regiment), McKamy's battalion, Indian battalion, and Barr's battery—a total force of 2,910. It is not clear why in this report General Martin seems to count one regiment twice. These regiments of active, hardy mountaineers were mainly employed in repelling the numerous raids through the mountains by Federal mixed forces, and in meeting detachments from Col. George W. Kirk's notorious regiment of Union North Carolinians. This regimen
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
2; 100, 1 Ellistown, Miss. 154, D13 Ellisville, Miss. 117, 1; 135-A; 155, F12 Elm Creek, Tex. 54, 1; 158, G1, 158, G8 Elm Springs, Ark. 10, 2, 10, 4 Ely's Ford, Va. 16, 1; 23, 4; 39, 2; 41, 1; 44, 3; 45, 1; 74, 1; 81, 1; 91, 1; 93, 1; 94, 6; 96, 1; 135, 6 Elyton, Ala. 76, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 148, A6; 171 Eminence, Mo. 135-A; 153, B5; 171 Emmitsburg, Md. 25, 6; 27, 1; 43, 7; 116, 2; 135-A; 136, D7 Enterprise, Mo. 160, D10; 171 Erwin, Battery, Tenn.: Plan 113, 1 Escambia River, Fla. 110, 1; 135-A; 147, D6 Fort Esperanza, Tex. 43, 8 Plan, 1863 26, 1 Essex (U. S.S.) 24, 1 Estill Springs, Tenn. 24, 3; 34, 4; 35, 1; 135-A; 149, B8 Etowah River, Ga. 48, 1; 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 1, 58, 2; 59, 3; 62, 1; 88, 2; 149, F11 Euchee Anna, Fla. 147, E9 Eureka, Mo. 152, E9 Evening Shade, Ark. 135-A; 153, F5 Evergreen, Ala. 147, B6 Ezra Church, Ga. 56, 7; 57, 3; 5
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
cal Inspector, Cleburne's Division, Nov. 30, ‘63. Unattached Dec. 30, ‘63. April 30, ‘64, 45th Alabama. Ellison, F. C., Assistant Surgeon, Sept. 30, to Oct. 30, ‘63, 2d Georgia Regiment. Erskine, Alexander, Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War May 30, ‘63, to rank from 16th Nov. ‘62 report to General Bragg. Passed Board Dec. ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, 2d Tennessee, Headquarters A. T., April 17, ‘63. July 21, ‘63, relieved with 2d Tennessee Regiment and ordered to report to S. H. Stout. Erwin, George Theoph., Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board. Dec. 10, ‘62, 8th Arkansas. Appointed by Secretary of War June 2, ‘63, to rank from 29th Sept. ‘62, reported to General Bragg Nov. 30, ‘63. April 30, ‘64, 8th and 9th Arkansas. Erskine, John Henry, Surgeon, passed Board at Murfreesboro Nov. 29, ‘62, appointed by Secretary of War Nov. 28, ‘62, to rank from same. Dec. 24, ‘62, Medical-Inspector, Cleburne's Division. A. and I. G. O., Richmond, March 30,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
into the fire down that military road, and there he received the wound which ended his life and brilliant career six days later. The battle was raging furiously at Meadow bridge on Sheridan's front, and right flank. The command of the brigade now devolved on Colonel Andrews, of the Second, as ranking officer. The Fifth was dismounted to join in the attack on foot. Company F was in front of that column. The order was to cross the road, still swept by canister, and form on its left. Captain Erwin looked calmly around at us and said: Come on boys. He led, and over the road the regiment went and formed in line of battle. We advanced fast to a horizontal, wide, board fence, which looked literally perforated with rifle balls, and after short firing on our part the enemy disappeared. Sheridan had broken over at Meadow bridge and escaped. Sheridan himself says on page 791, volume 67, War Records. The enemy considered us completely cornered, but such was not the case. Well, of cour
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Brook Church fight, and something about the Fifth North Carolina cavalry. (search)
into the fire down that military road, and there he received the wound which ended his life and brilliant career six days later. The battle was raging furiously at Meadow bridge on Sheridan's front, and right flank. The command of the brigade now devolved on Colonel Andrews, of the Second, as ranking officer. The Fifth was dismounted to join in the attack on foot. Company F was in front of that column. The order was to cross the road, still swept by canister, and form on its left. Captain Erwin looked calmly around at us and said: Come on boys. He led, and over the road the regiment went and formed in line of battle. We advanced fast to a horizontal, wide, board fence, which looked literally perforated with rifle balls, and after short firing on our part the enemy disappeared. Sheridan had broken over at Meadow bridge and escaped. Sheridan himself says on page 791, volume 67, War Records. The enemy considered us completely cornered, but such was not the case. Well, of cour
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