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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for B. F. Eshleman or search for B. F. Eshleman in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's division. (search)
elebrated battalion was originally founded in 1838. In the Mexican war it was Company A, of Colonel Persifer Smith's regiment, of which Colonel J. B. Walton, who commanded the battalion from 1861 to 1864, was Lieutenant-Colonel. It was composed of five batteries, of which the first four served in Virginia, and the fifth with the Army of Tennessee. Its battery commanders in March, 1862, were: Captains C. W. Squires, T. L. Rosser, (afterwards Major-General of calvary), M. B. Miller, and B. F. Eshleman. Its material was superb; the cannooneers being almost exclusively young men of the best families of New Orleans. Its numbers were general small, as it refused to receive recruits promiscuously, and the four batteries usually averaged but three guns each. of New Orleans was assigned to Longstreet's division when this movement commenced, and continued to serve with the division and corps until the latter came to Georgia in September, 1863. After crossing the Rappahannock, a halt of a