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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 152 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
amin D. Fearing, Ninety-second Ohio Infantry. No. 157Col. Newell Gleason, Eighty-seventh Indiana Infantry, commanding Second Brigade. No. 158Maj. Cyrus J. McCole, Seventy-fifth Indiana Infantry. No. 159Lieut. Col. Edwin P. Hammond, Eighty-seventh Indiana Infantry. No. 160Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan, One hundred and first Indiana Infantry. No. 161Lieut. Col. Judson W. Bishop, Second Minnesota Infantry. No. 162Lieut. Col. George T. Perkins, One hundred and fifth Ohio Infantry. No. 163Col. George P. Este, Fourteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Third Brigade. No. 164Col. William H. Hays, Tenth Kentucky Infantry. No. 165Maj. John W. Wilson, Fourteenth Ohio Infantry, of operations, May 10-August 20. No. 166Capt. George W. Kirk, Fourteenth Ohio Infantry, of operations September 1. No. 167Col. William A. Choate, Thirty-eighth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 10-August 15. No. 168Maj. Charles Houghtaling, First Illinois Light Artillery, Chief of Artillery, Fourteenth Army Corps. No. 16
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
aged until near Pine Mountain, on the 14th, where, having taken position the night previous (being formed in two lines, the right connecting with General Wagner's brigade, of General Newton's division, of the Fourth Corps, and on the left with Colonel Este's brigade, of General Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps), with the Thirty-second Indiana Infantry covering our front as skirmishers, the brigade moved forward about 9 a. m., gradually obliquing to the left to keep our connection with CColonel Este's brigade. The enemy stubbornly resisted our advance, but we steadily pressed him back about three-fourths of a mile, where, striking his first line of works on Pine Mountain, we halted within 300 yards of the same and strongly intrenched the position thus obtained, our line facing south. The enemy having abandoned his line of works on Pine Mountain during the night of the 14th, we took possession of the same at daylight on the 15th. At 12 m. of the same day our front was relieved
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
some protection to the troops, and a momentary halt was made, and the lines rectified. Up to this point the effect of the enemy's fire had been but lightly felt, generally along the line, except by Edie's brigade, which was some distance in advance of the general line, and had struck a projecting flank of the enemy's works, charged, and carried it, with considerable loss. The position thus gallantly gained was only partially held, owing to the impossibility of supports getting up in time. Este's brigade, of Baird's division, was ordered to report to General Carlin as a support to this part of the line, and was promptly placed in position so as to relieve this brigade in the following attack. The other two brigades of Baird's division were held close in reserve in rear of the left of the corps, with a view to pushing our success on this flank after the position had been carried. At a quarter to 5 o'clock I ordered the lines, as now formed and represented by the accompanying map,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 95 (search)
to fall back about 100 yards. A portion of this brigade gallantly clung to the works till overpowered and captured. When preparing to reform the Second Brigade for another charge, I received information from General Davis that he had ordered Colonel Este's brigade, of Baird's division, to support me. As it was fresh and well formed I placed it in position for a charge, when General Baird arrived and gallantly led it himself. It is an agreeable duty that I perform in saying that the conduct of this brigade was truly admirable, and that they deserved the success they achieved. Colonel Este deserves promotion for his gallantry and good management. The Third Brigade continued the fight till every rebel was driven or dragged from the works. The Thirty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Griffin commanding, deserves great credit in this part of the fight, as they had to contend almost alone against a very obstinate foe strongly intrenched. The enemy having lost his w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
the rebel line then advancing, and the regiment moved forward about 100 yards, and, in conjunction with Ninety-fourth Ohio and Twenty-first Wisconsin formed a flank line and threw up, works. Remained in this position to 2d June, nothing further of importance occurring than some light skirmishing. June 2, advanced line by swinging to the right; center of regiment rested at an old house on the prolongation of general line; constructed works and was then relieved by Thirty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Este's brigade, Third Division. With the brigade the regiment retired into a woods, a small distance to the rear, and rested. Nothing further of interest occurred until the 6th of June; on this day marched in the direction of Kenesaw Mountain about five miles and bivouacked; nothing worthy of notice occurring in the interim. On the — June marched about three miles toward Kenesaw Mountain and camped. From this time to the 17th June, the regiment with the brigade being in reserve, nothing wo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 108 (search)
, and build works. This battalion remained here until daylight of the 8th, when it was relieved and returned to the old works in rear. During this assault the battalion was under a severe fire from 3 p. m. till dark, losing 3 killed, 41 wounded, and 8 missing. On the 9th instant moved into works built on the night of the 7th, remaining until the night of the 10th instant, losing 2 men killed and 3 wounded. On the 11th moved into works on left of Third Division, relieving troops belonging to Este's brigade, and remained until the 26th instant, having 11 deserters come into our line; and losing 3 men wounded while-in this position. On the night of the 26th abandoned the works, moving out quietly at 8 o'clock, leaving a strong skirmish line behind with orders to follow just before daybreak, and moved to the right, lying in rear of Fourth Corps all next day. On the 28th marched to the right and on to the West Point railroad, the battalion going on picket for the night; and the next mor
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 116 (search)
a destructive fire, the troops on the left of the road were withdrawn to our original line at the edge of the field, two regiments holding the works in our own proper front. These the enemy did not attempt to recover. We held the ground during the night, constructing defenses both at the border of the field and at the front. I have ascertained, beyond a question, that 123 prisoners were taken and sent to the rear by my command. These were sent across from our right in the direction of Colonel Este's and General Morgan's commands to avoid the fire to which they would have been exposed in going to our rear. Some other prisoners were sent through my lines when men could not be spared to take charge of them. Of the, number I can make no reliable estimate. In this engagement my command fought under many serious disadvantages. The distance from the field to the main works on my right was 100 yards, on my left 300. The lines had to advance over this space through a dense thicket or
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 128 (search)
e right of what I supposed to be the right of General Carlin's command, but have since heard that Este's brigade, of the Third Division, had formed on the right of General Carlin. Seeing the importan commenced before the second line was fully formed. I wish now to speak of the formation: Colonel Este's brigade was formed on good ground in three lines, and directly parallel with the enemy's works; my First Brigade was formed in two lines to the right of Este's, on lower and more broken ground, and on a different angle, to correspond with the angle on the enemy's work directly in their fronts, the Seventeenth New York and Tenth Michigan, uncovered the first line and covered that of Colonel Este's brigade. Upon entering the woods, under cover of which the enemy had intrenched, they wereredit of this most successful charge; neither did I think it necessary to report that all of Colonel Este's command, that had carried the enemy's works previous to my second line coming to their reli
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 130 (search)
Baird's right brigade. After entering the woods, said brigade (Colonel Este's) seems to have been greatly reduced in numbers (it is alleged his regiments), and finding himself unsupported on both flanks, Colonel Este requested Major Burnett to form on the left of said brigade. Thred, advanced, and secured a brilliant success, on a point where Colonel Este's men, before his arrival, saw nothing but destruction, and wered onward, reaching the edge of the woods in perfect order. Here Colonel Este, commanding a brigade in General Baird's division, called on Coltnessing the confusion in his front, thought best to comply with Colonel Este's request, and moved his command to the left. Here he advanced He moved forward, and before reaching his position fell in with Colonel Este's brigade. That officer did not know the position of our brigadwas no one on hand to give information as to their whereabouts. Colonel Este being hard pressed and his left greatly exposed, applied for ass
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 137 (search)
oved rapidly up the hill to the woods, from which the enemy was firing. Arriving near the woods the regiment moved to the left and then forward into the woods. I have since been informed that Colonel Grower made this movement oy direction of Colonel Este, commanding the Third Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, for the purpose of supporting that brigade. Here the regiment came under very heavy fire, to which the right wing replied sharply. I discovered that some of our troops wer told him I feared I should not be able to find the Sixtieth without some one to direct me; said he could send no one. I moved forward in the direction he indicated, and soon came upon the Third Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel Este, commanding this brigade, told me he could not tell me where Colonel Lum's brigade was, but was sure they were not in his front, and he did not think I could find it. Said he was hard pressed and wished me to assist him; that he had a vacant p
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