Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. S. Ewell or search for R. S. Ewell in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
moted to fill the vacancy caused by the death of General Branch, and from that time to the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse this command was known in the Army of Northern Virginia as Lane's brigade. Ordered to Virginia. Early in May, 1862, this command was ordered to Virginia, and, on reaching Richmond, it was at once sent to Gordonsville. It remained there and at Rapidan station, on the Orange and Alexandria railroad, only a short time, when it was ordered to the Valley to join General Ewell, but, on reaching the base of the Blue Ridge, the order was countermanded and it was taken to Hanover Courthouse. From that point it was moved, on the 26th of May, to Slash church, near Peake's turnout on the Virginia Central railroad. Battle at Slash church and Hanover Courthouse. Early next morning General Branch sent the Twenty-eighth regiment under me to Taliaferro's mill to cut off a body of marauders, but it was itself cut off from the remainder of the brigade by an overwh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
s, so graphically described in his allusion to Ewell's division, in Jackson's Valley campaign of 18 near by here, in Botetourt county, Virginia. Ewell, Taylor, Semmes, Peck, Stafford, Hays, Wheat--in my sketch by referring to Generals Jackson, Ewell and Trimble. Of the first two, General Taylor were generally known. I propose to tell what Ewell thought of Jackson and said to me, and what hel Jackson, the lemon squeezer, was crazy. General Ewell at one time thought him a crazy wagon hunteadquarters Valley District, May, 1862. General R. S. Ewell: Your dispatch received. Hold your t me know the hour you get off. (At that time Ewell had no idea what Jackson's plans were.) A courrred, and begged I would never send him to General Ewell again. I followed Shields for three daye equaled Forrest in his boldest moves. General Ewell formed the highest admiration for Ashby, a, I was at General Jackson's headquarters with Ewell, and heard the orders given for the next morni[10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The captured guns at Spotsylvania Courthouse — Correction of General Ewell's report. (search)
thought the matter had ended, until I saw General Ewell's report. It appears, therefore, that if person, for the space of about five hours. General Ewell, therefore, fell into an error, unintentiothem; which fact, I think, you reported to General Ewell (we then being at his headquarters). Withi Southern Historical Society: My Dear Sir--General Ewell in his report of the battle of Spotsylvato the enemy's hands. In this statement General Ewell does unintentional injustice to Major Page see about the matter. The way in which General Ewell fell into error, was that Sergeant Green (o Major Page, who, in turn, reported it to General Ewell. But immediately thereupon Major Page weno look for the guns, but did not so inform General Ewell, who was gone when he returned. He madet will correct all erroneous statements in General Ewell's report of the 12th October, at Spotsylvair or ingenuous gentlemen in our army than General Ewell, and it is clear that he was misinformed i[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's report of affair of October 27th, 1864. (search)
October, having partially recovered from my wound received at the battle of the Wilderness, I reported for duty, and assumed command of the troops on the north side of the James river, consisting of the local defence troops, commanded by Lieutenant-General Ewell, Hoke's division, Field's division, and Gary's brigade of cavalry, as well as Pickett's division, holding the lines from the James river to Swift creek. General Ewell's command was in position in the trenches, between the river and FoGeneral Ewell's command was in position in the trenches, between the river and Fort Gilmer; General Hoke between the New Market and the Darbytown roads, and General Field took up the line to the Charles City road, both along the line of works which had been thrown up connecting Fort Gilmer with the exterior line, at the Charles City road. General Gary was picketing the White Oak swamp, the crossings of which had been obstructed, and had the main body of his cavalry to the left of and back of the outer line of works. On the 25th of October, I was advised of the crossing
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