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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 347 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 317 55 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 268 46 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 147 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 145 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 140 16 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 134 58 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 129 13 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 123 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 27, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Ewell or search for Ewell in all documents.

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bject being to make a reconnaissance. On his arrival at this point he discovered that he was cut off from all communication with Gen. R. E. Lee, a corps of the enemy had moved up from Rappahannock bridge on the Auburn road, placing itself between Gen. Lee and himself.-- Gen. S. succeeded in sending some of his couriers through the enemy's lines, thereby enabling him to apprise. Gen. Lee of his position and what was transpiring around him. At early dawn the next morning, the 14th instant, Gen. Ewell moved forward with his command and attacked this corps and soon repulsed it. Gen Stuart also had a pretty sharp fight with the enemy. Gen. Gorden, with great bravery, led his old regiment, the 1st N. C., and captured a whole regiment of infantry; but a very superior force of the enemy arriving at this juncture, he was compelled to release it. In this charge, which has scarcely a parallel for gallantry and for the handsome manner in which it was executed, Gen. G. had the heel of one of his
, were bent in all kinds of shapes, rendering them totally unfit for use. It will take at least twenty-five days to place the road in a working condition, with all the facilities of stock, tools, and workmen at our disposal. Two divisions of Ewell's corps were sent some time ago to operate against Burnside, who has alarmed the rebels to the highest pitch. Their place of destination is Lynchburg, which is the grand depot of supplies for Lee's army. Ewell was in command of the detachment, Ewell was in command of the detachment, which was composed of nothing but infantry. The execution of Dr. D. M. Wright, of Norfolk, for killing United States officer some time since, took place at ten o'clock Friday morning at the Fair Grounds, one mile from the city. There were five regiments and one battery of artillery present. He was calm and self-possessed, and stated that be committed the crime without premeditation. A letter from Halifax, N. S. dated the 17th inst., says: The English steamer Giraffe, now calle