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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 426 4 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 411 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 307 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 212 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 187 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 170 2 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 129 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 120 6 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 107 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Richard S. Ewell or search for Richard S. Ewell in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 5 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
n defense of their country. In the Capitol were stores of correspondence and other papers captured from Pillow and his fellow-traitors, and these were placed at the disposal of the author, who also had the good fortune to meet in Nashville General Ewell, one of the most estimable of the Confederates who took up arms against the Government, as a man and as a military leader. He kindly allowed him to make abstracts of his later reports, in manuscript, concerning operations in the Shenandoah Vernment, as a man and as a military leader. He kindly allowed him to make abstracts of his later reports, in manuscript, concerning operations in the Shenandoah Valley, in which he and Stonewall Jackson were associated, and also furnished him with information relative to the evacuation of Richmond, and the destruction of a great portion of it by fire immediately succeeding that event, when Ewell was in command of the post. That subject will be considered hereafter. Tail-piece — bomb-shel
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
econnoissance of the corps of Howard and Sumner toward the Rappahannock, George Stoneman. moved back to Alexandria. Stoneman's advance retired at the same time, followed some distance, in spite of mud and weather, by the cavalry of Stuart and Ewell, a battery of artillery, and some infantry. Stoneman's report to General McClellan, March 16, 1862. Then the Confederates moved leisurely on and encamped, first behind the Rappahannock, and then in a more eligible position beyond the Rapid Annpontoon bridges, telegraph materials, and an immense amount of equipage. The only loss sustained in this work of transportation consisted of S mules and 9 barges, the cargoes of the latter being saved. The movements of Stonewall Jackson, General Ewell, and other active commanders in the Upper Valley of the Shenandoah and its vicinity, had made it important to strengthen Fremont in the Mountain Department, and for that purpose Blenker's division of ten thousand men was withdrawn from the Ar
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
an exciting race in that Valley Jackson and Ewell hard pressed, 395. battle of Cross Keys, 396.e the dawn. The equally vigilant Banks Richard S. Ewell. was on the alert, and at daylight his t about to retreat, Colonel Crutchfield came to Ewell with orders from Jackson to fall back to Newtois evident from the manuscript daily record of Ewell's brigade, consulted by the writer, that to Ewmen, who were made prisoners. The record of Ewell's Adjutant, mentioned in note 1, page 891, wasback, at the moment when Milroy had penetrated Ewell's center, and was almost up to his guns. Thatle settlement was known as the Cross Keys. Ewell, whose position was an excellent one, intendedh, and was occupying the town when Fremont and Ewell were fighting at Cross Keys. The vanguard of ed Jackson, for he would have cut him off from Ewell, who was fighting Fremont a few miles distant.ial new bridge on the site of the one fired by Ewell's rear-guard. After spending a little time th[10 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
was necessarily detained to fight Jackson and Ewell, and to watch an active foe beyond the Rapid Ay as if McDowell was with him, and Jackson and Ewell were confronting that soldier on the Chickahomhat large forces, supposed to be Jackson's and Ewell's, forced his advance from Charlestown to-day.f Richmond, for word had come that Jackson and Ewell had just been fighting Fremont and Shields neaus thing to do at that crisis, for Jackson and Ewell had crossed the Beaver Dam Creek above, cut ofn the extreme left. of the Confederate line. Ewell's division, in the mean time, came into actionrces on flank and rear; and he sent Stuart and Ewell to seize the railway and cut McClellan's commuformed his line with the divisions of Jackson, Ewell, Whiting, and D. H. Hill, on the left (a large portion of Ewell's in reserve), and those of Magruder and Huger on the right, while A. P. Hill's ainent Professor B. S. Ewell (brother of General R. S. Ewell), the President of William and Mary Col
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
But Miles did no such thing. At nine o'clock that night he allowed his cavalry, two thousand strong, under Colonel Davis, to depart, and before morning eleven of Ewell's guns were taken across the Shenandoah, and so planted as to assail the National batteries on Bolivar Heights, in reverse. At dawn no less than nine batteries op thickly in the morning with standing corn. Hood had been withdrawn during the night, and his troops had been replaced by the brigades of Lawton and Trimble, of Ewell's corps, with Jackson's Stonewall brigade under D. R. Jones, supported by the remaining brigades of Ewell. Jackson, surrounded by the remnant of his old command, Ewell. Jackson, surrounded by the remnant of his old command, was in charge of the Confederate left. That remnant, according to his report, was not more than 4,000 strong, it having been almost. decimated by fighting from the Rapid Anna to the Potomac, and by straggling in Maryland. In this encounter the Confederate leaders Lawton and Jones were wounded, and Early took the place of the f