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John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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and the final argument of the battle-field. Lip-service and the hireling sword are everywhere at the command of power; but men like these, at their need, the generations must wait for. They are the product of wisdom, and justice, and beneficence, in the country which possesses them. Besotted is the people who believe that their place can be supplied by able adventurers. The splendid military genius of Hannibal could not sustain itself with mercenary spears against the moderate talents of Fabius and the unequal inspiration of Scipio, animated by patriotic fervor. But, devoted as General Johnston was to the Union, he could not forget that he was also the citizen of a State. To Texas he had sworn allegiance; his estate and his best years had been spent in shielding her; he had aided to merge her autonomy and to limit her independent sovereignty by annexation, and he knew that when she entered the Union it was by treaty, as an equal, and that the Constitution was the bond to which
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
re, we will pay him back for Gettysburg. But the old fox is too cunning. These and similar expressions showed clearly that they believed their position strong enough to hold it against any attacking force. The country has never realized how much it owes to General Meade's moral firmness in resisting his strong desire to attack the enemy here and at Gettysburg, and in view of the vital issues depending upon his action on these occasions, it may be said of him, as truly as it was said of Fabius: Unus homo nobis cunctando restituit rem; Non ponebat enim rumores ante salutem. ´╝łOne man by delay restored to us the State, for he preferred the public safety to his own fame.) Although General Meade needs no eulogy, his great deeds speaking for him more eloquently than any words, it may not be out of place to say something concerning his character as a soldier and as a man. As a soldier he was singularly modest and unassuming. He did his duty always in a quiet and undemonstrat
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
s War, Frederick the Great was the aggressor; but in the last four he gave the true model of an offensive defense. It must be confessed also, that he was marvelously seconded by his adversaries, who emulously gave him all the leisure and the occasions for taking the initiative with success. Wellington also played this part in the greater portion of his career in Portugal, in Spain and in Belgium, and, in fact, it was the only one which suited his position. It is always easy to play the. Fabius, when one does it on an ally's territory, when he has not to trouble himself about the fate of the capital, or of the provinces menaced; in a word, when he is at liberty to consult military convenience only. Definitively, it appears incontestable, that one of the greatest of a general's talents, is to know how to employ by turns these two systems, and especially, to know how to retake the initiative in the midst even of a defensive struggle. Article XVII: of the theatre of operation
Chapter 18: Rashness Johnston Fabius Scipio. Before closing these pages, I request the privilege of correcting a false impryears, different commanders sallied forth and delivered battle; but Fabius continued to adhere strictly to his plan of warfare, and stubbornlyannibal, and was only spared utter destruction by the timely aid of Fabius. Varro marched out, fought the Carthagenians near Cannaee, was defined important advantages over the enemy; but, as history tells us, Fabius permitted no allurement of his foe, nor outcry of his countrymen, ten in his own Army. * * * Thus the soldiers were brought to despise Fabius, and by way of derision to call him the pedagogue of Hannibal, whil Italy laid waste with fire and sword. And he asked the friends of Fabius whether he intended to take his Army up into heaven, as if he had bsults achieved, and far greater his title to distinction. Although Fabius succeeded in wasting in a great measure the strength of his adversa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
ch shall blame the other? It was a fault, if fault there were, such as in a soldier leans to virtue's side; it was the fault of Marlbrook at Malplaquet, of Great Frederic at Torgau, of Napoleon at Borodino. It is the famous fault of the column of Fontenoy, and the generous haste that led Hampden to his death. Lee chose no defensive of his own will. None knew better than he that axiom of the military art which finds the logical end of defence in surrender. None knew better than he that Fabius had never earned his fame by the policy some attribute to him, nor saved his country by retreats, however regular, or the skill, however great, to choose positions only to abandon them. The defensive was not his chosen field, but he was fated to conduct a defensive campaign rivaled by few, and surpassed by none in history. Of that wonderful work the details are yet to be gathered, but the outlines are known the world over. The tremendous onset of Lee in the tangled Wilderness upon an enem
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dickinson, John, 1732-1808 (search)
at body. Considering the resolution of independence unwise, he voted against it and the Declaration, and did not sign the latter document. This made him unpopular. In 1777 he was made a brigadier-general of the Pennsylvania militia. He was elected a representative in Congress from Delaware in 1779, and wrote the Address to the States put forth by that body in May of that year. He was successively president of the States of Delaware and Pennsylvania (1781-85), and a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution (1787). Letters from his pen, over the signature of Fabius, John Dickinson. advocating the adoption of the national Constitution, appeared in 1788; and another series, over the same signature, on our relations with France, appeared in 1797. Mr. Dickinson assisted in framing the constitution of Delaware in 1792. His monument is Dickinson College (q. v.), at Carlisle, Pa., which he founded and liberally endowed. He died in Wilmington, Del., Feb. 14, 1808.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
nd the great debate on ratification began. The newspapers teemed with political essays, and pamphlets multiplied. The Constitution lacked neither friends nor foes. On the side of the Constitution were James Sullivan of Massachusetts, with his eleven letters of Cassius; Oliver Ellsworth of Connecticut, with thirteen letters of A Landholder; Roger Sherman of the same state, who contributed five letters of A Countryman and two of A Citizen of New Haven; and John Dickinson, in his Letters of Fabius. The opposing views of the Anti-federalists were vigorously set forth by Agrippa, whose eighteen letters are probably to be ascribed to James Winthrop of Massachusetts; by George Clinton of New York, who published seven letters under the name of Cato; by Robert Yates, in two letters of Sydney; and in seven letters by Luther Martin. All the foregoing are reprinted in P. L. Ford, Essays on the Constitution. The pamphlet literature was equally important. Noah Webster, best known to lat
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
friend in Rhode Island, a, 128 Letter from Aristocles, 83 n. Letter in defence of Aristocles, 83 n. Letter to his countrymen, a, 294 n., 301 n., 302 Letters and social aims, 352 Letters from an American Farmer, 192, 199 Letters from a Virginian, 136 Letters from the South, 239 Letters from Palmyra, 324 Letters from under a Bridge, 241 Letters of a Farmer in Pennsylvania, etc., 119, 120, 131-132, 140 Letters of Charles Eliot Norton, 355 n., 356 n. Letters of Fabius, 148 Letters of the British spy, 190, 202, 233, 236-237 Lettsom, Dr., 192 Lewis, Meriwether, 203-205, 209, 210 Lewis [R.?], 151 Liberty, 262 n., 271 Liberty and necessity, on, 94 Liberty Tree, 167 Liberty's call, 167 Library of poetry and song, 276 Life and manners, in the West, 318 Life in Brooklyn, etc., 229 Life in New York, or the fireman on duty, 228 Life in the New world, 212 Life of Columbus (see Columbus), 258 Life of Mahomet, 257 Life of Washi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
ing her lifetime. Her Poems (1890) and Poems (1892) were edited by M. L. Todd and T. W. Higginson; and Letters of Emily Dickinson (2 vols., 1894) by M. L. Todd. She died at Amherst, May 15, 1886. Dickinson, John Born in Maryland, Nov. 13, 1732. He studied law in Philadelphia and in London and practiced successfully in Philadelphia; was a member of the First Continental Congress and the author of a series of state papers put forth by that body. In 1788, he wrote nine letters signed Fabius, and was the author of Letters from a Pennsylvania farmer to the inhabitants of the British colonies (1767); Essays on the constitutional power of great Britain over the colonies in America (1774). Died in Wilmington, Del., Feb. 14, 1808. Drake, Joseph Rodman Born in New York City, Aug. 7, 1795. Left an orphan, he suffered the hardships of poverty and after a brief business career, studied medicine. At fourteen he wrote the poem The Mocking bird. In 1819, he, with Fitz-Greene Hallec
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 4 (search)
al Dana's brigade. to make a charge with the bayonet into the woods occupied by the enemy. This operation was handsomely executed, and resulted in driving back the Confederates in confusion. Thus, when all was lost, Sumner's soldierly promptitude saved the day, as Moreau, flying to the assistance of Napoleon when hard pressed by the Austrians in Italy, chained victory to the standards of the French. O Moreau! exclaimed that illustrious war-minister Carnot, on hearing of this; oh, my dear Fabius, how great you were in that circumstance! how superior to the wretched rivalries of generals, which so often cause the best-laid enterprises to miscarry! Alison: History of Europe, vol. III., p. 327. The brave old Sumner now sleeps in a soldier's grave; but that one act of heroic duty must embalm his memory in the hearts of his countrymen. In this bloody encounter the Confederates lost nearly seven thousand men, and the Union army upwards of five thousand. But a severer loss befell
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