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John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Chapter 18: Rashness Johnston Fabius Scipio. Before closing these pages, I request the privilege of correcting a false impryears, different commanders sallied forth and delivered battle; but Fabius continued to adhere strictly to his plan of warfare, and stubbornlyannibal, and was only spared utter destruction by the timely aid of Fabius. Varro marched out, fought the Carthagenians near Cannaee, was defined important advantages over the enemy; but, as history tells us, Fabius permitted no allurement of his foe, nor outcry of his countrymen, ten in his own Army. * * * Thus the soldiers were brought to despise Fabius, and by way of derision to call him the pedagogue of Hannibal, whil Italy laid waste with fire and sword. And he asked the friends of Fabius whether he intended to take his Army up into heaven, as if he had bsults achieved, and far greater his title to distinction. Although Fabius succeeded in wasting in a great measure the strength of his adversa