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Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 15 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Fagan or search for Fagan in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
prising Parsons' and McRae's two brigades, one 1868 strong, and the other numbering 1227 men; of Fagan's brigade, with about eighteen hundred men; of Marmaduke's division of cavalry, 1750 strong; and was to be made at daybreak—by Price in the centre, against the redoubt on the Cemetery road; by Fagan on the right, against Fort Hindman. The cavalry formed the left of the army; Marmaduke was to d. A deep ravine, then a series of abatis, and three successive lines of half-bastions, separate Fagan from Fort Hindman: none of these obstacles, however, can stop him; his soldiers climb the steep McRae to rally his scattered troops as much as possible and to attack Fort Hindman, before which Fagan's brigade is still to be found. But this double movement is productive of disastrous results. aining serious losses, he finds himself obliged to look for refuge near the position occupied by Fagan. The attack has been a failure. At ten o'clock Holmes gives the signal for retreat. The rem