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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
T. Sumter Brownfield; and 3 10-inch mortars, Lieutenants C. R. Holmes and N. Armstrong) and the Stevens Iron-clad Battery (3 8-inch columbiads), Captain George B. Cuthbert, Lieutenant G. L. Buist; Trapier Battery (3 10-inch mortars), Captain J. Gadsden King, Lieutenants W. D. H. Kirkwood, J. P. Strohecker, A. M. Huger, and E. L. Parker. James Island, Major N. G. Evans commanding; Fort Johnson (battery of 24-pounders), Captain George S. James; Mortar Battery, Lieutenants W. H. Gibbes, H. S. Farley, J. E. McP. Washington, and T. B. Hayne; Upper Battery (2 10-inch mortars), Lower Battery (2 10-inch mortars), Captain S. C. Thayer.-editors. It was conceded that he had done his duty as a soldier holding a most delicate trust. This first bombardment of Sumter was but its baptism of fire. During subsequent attacks by land and water, it was battered by the heaviest Union artillery. Its walls were completely crushed, but the tons of iron projectiles imbedded in its ruins added streng
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
inhabitants made their way slowly back toward their homes, and very soon the gathering thunder-storm burst over the city. Patiently, firmly, almost silently, the little band in Fort Sumter awaited the passage of that pregnant hour. Each man could hear his own heart beat as the expiring moments brought him nearer to inevitable but unknown perils. Suddenly the dull booming of a gun at a signal-battery on James Island, near Fort Johnson, was heard, That signal-gun was fired by Lieutenant H. S. Farley. and a fiery shell, sent from its broad throat, went flying through the black night and exploded immediately over Fort Sumter. It was a malignant shooting star, coursing through the heavens like those, in appearance, which in the olden time affrighted the nations. It was one of fearful portent, and was the forerunner of terrible calamities. Then, no man was wise enough to interpret its full augury. The sound of that mortar on James Island was the signal for battle. It awakene
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ew's being attached to James island. Col. L. M. Keitt, Twentieth South Carolina, commanded on Sullivan's island; Col. William Butler, Fort Moultrie and the batteries outside. On Morris island Col. R. F. Graham, of the Twenty-first, was in charge. Gen. States R. Gist, on his return from Wilmington, commanded on James island and in St. Andrew's. Fort Sumter, garrisoned by the First artillery, was in charge of Col. Alfred Rhett, and Forts Ripley and Castle Pinckney were commanded by Capt. H. S. Farley. The following South Carolina troops were at this time on duty in the State: Infantry: First regiment regulars, Col. William Butler, Fort Moultrie; Third volunteers, Col. C. J. Colcock, Third district; Eleventh, Colonel Heyward, Third district; Sixteenth, Col. James McCullough, Second district; Twentieth, Col. L. M. Keitt, Sullivan's island; Twenty-first, Col. R. F. Graham, Morris island; Twenty-fourth, Col. C. H. Stevens, Third district; Twenty-fifth, Col. C. H. Simonton, James