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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
ced the defenses of Mobile bay, capturing Fort Morgan, etc., and the Federals held Pensacola, but had made no movements into the interior. Major General Maury commanded the Confederate forces garrisoning Mobile and adjacent works, with Commodore Farrand, Confederate Navy, in charge of several armed vessels. Small bodies of troops were stationed at different points through the department, and Major General Forrest, with his division of cavalry, was in the Northeast Mississippi. Directing o room for hesitancy. Folly and madness combined would not have justified an attempt to prolong a hopeless contest. General Canby was informed that I desired to meet him for the purpose of negotiating a surrender of my forces, and that Commodore Farrand, commanding the armed vessels in the Alabama river, desired to meet Rear Admiral Thatcher for a similar purpose. Citronville, some forty miles north of Mobile, was the appointed place; and there, in the early days of May, 1865, the great
ed by the masterly raid of General J. H. Wilson's cavalry through Alabama, and his defeat of Forrest at Selma. An officer of Taylor's staff came to Canby's headquarters on April 19 to make arrangements for the surrender of all the Confederate forces east of the Mississippi not already paroled by Sherman and Wilson, embracing some forty-two thousand men. The terms were agreed upon and signed on May 4, at the village of Citronelle in Alabama. At the same time and place the Confederate Commodore Farrand surrendered to Rear-Admiral Thatcher all the naval forces of the Confederacy in the neighborhood of Mobile-a dozen vessels and some hundreds of officers. The rebel navy had practically ceased to exist some months before. The splendid fight in Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864, between Farragut's fleet and the rebel ram Tennessee, with her three attendant gunboats, and Cushing's daring destruction of the powerful Albemarle in Albemarle Sound on October 27, marked its end in Confederate
ed, and reported that the Colonel's brigade had been totally routed, and all his artillery captured, Col. Sigel himself having been either killed or made prisoner. Most of our men had fired away all their ammunition, and all that could be obtained from the boxes of the killed and wounded. Nothing, therefore, was left to do but to return to Springfield; where 250 Home Guards, with two pieces of artillery, had been left to take care of the train. On reaching the Little York road, we met Lieut. Farrand, with his company of dragoons, and a considerable portion of Col. Sigel's command, with one piece of artillery. At 5 o'clock, P. M., we reached Springfield. Of course, the Confederates claimed the result as a success; and with good reason, since they stood on the defensive and held the field, and could show as trophies five of Sigel's six guns; but there is no pretense, on their part, of having pursued those whom they claimed to have beaten; and McCulloch's first official report onl
as here so narrow as to compel him to come to anchor; which he did very near the lower barrier, and within 600 yards of the Rebel guns. Tie at once opened fire on tile battery, and maintainedl a most unequal contest for 3 1/2 hours; when, having exhausted his ammunition, he desisted and fell down the river. The Galena had 13 men killed and 11 wounded; the Naugatuck 2, and the Port Royal 1 wounded. The bursting of a 100-pound Parrott on the Naugatuck threatened a more serious disaster. Capt. Farrand, commanding the Rebel battery, reports his loss at 7 killed and 8 wounded. The first collision on the Chickahominy between the advance of Gen. McClellan's army and the Rebels occurred May 24. near New Bridge; were the 4th Michigan, Col. Woodbury, waded the stream and assailed and drove off a superior Rebel force, losing but 8 men in all, and taking 37 prisoners, of whom 15 were wounded. Directly afterward, Gen. Fitz-John Porter, commanding the 5th corps, on our right, was orde
of existence the second army of the Confederacy. The surrender to Gen. Canby of Gen. Taylor's Rebel forces in Alabama was effected at Citronelle, May 4, as the result of negotiations commenced April 19. More words were used; but the terms were essentially the same as had been accorded to Lee and Johnston, with this addition: Transportation and subsistence to be furnished at public cost for the officers and men, after surrender, to the nearest practicable point to their homes. Com. Farrand, at the same time and on the same terms, surrendered to Rear-Admiral Thatcher the twelve Rebel gunboats blockaded in the Tombigbee river, with 20 officers and 110 others. Mr. Jefferson Davis, with his staff and civilian associates, having journeyed by rail from Richmond to Danville, April 3. he there halted, and set up his Government; issuing April 5. thence a stirring proclamation, designed to inspirit the Confederates to a determined prosecution of the contest; saying:
en., killed at Gettysburg, 388. Farragut, Admiral D. G., bombards vicksburg, 578; at Ship Island, 83; at months of the Mississippi, 84-85; 86; his attack on and passage of defenses below New Orleans, 88 to 94; his forces occupy the city, 95-6; his reply to Mayor Monroe, 96; at Baton Rouge, 101; his fleet runs by Vicksburg batteries, 101; 102; bombards Donaldsonville, 102; returns to New Orleans, 102; at the capture of Port Hudson, 332; assails Forts Morgan and Gaines, Mobile bay, 651. Farrand, Comr., surrenders to Rear-Admiral Fletcher on the Tombigbee river, 754. Fayetteville, N. C., taken by Sherman, 633. Fayetteville, Ark., Cabell defeated at, 448. Featherston, Brig.-Gen. W. S., wounded at Glendale, 163. Federal Government, its right to subdue resistance to its authority, 232. Ferrero, Brig.-Gen. Edward, in attack on Roanoke Island, 76; defends Fort Sanders, 432. field, Brig.-Gen., at second Bull Run, 189. Fish, Col., 16th La., killed at Stone River, 282.
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
orld's navies as the flag which waved over the first iron-clad. Losses in the Confederate Navy.--1861-65. Date. Vessel. Commander. Battle. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. 1862               Mch. 2-19 Virginia The Merrimac. Buchanan Hampton Roads 2 19   21 April 24 Gov. Moore Kennon New Orleans 57 17   Out of 93 on board, as stated by Commander Beverly Kennon, in the Century Magazine.74 May 10 General Price Hawthorne Plum Point, Miss. 2 1   3 May 15 Marine Corps Farrand Drewry's Bluff 7 9   16 July 15 Arkansas Brown Yazoo 10 15   25 July 22 Arkansas Brown Vicksburg 7 6   Out of a crew of 41.13 1863               Jan. 1 Bayou City Lubbock Galveston 12 70   82 Jan. 1 Neptune Bayley Galveston Jan. 11 Alabama Semmes Hatteras   1   1 Feb. 24 Queen of the West McCloskey Indianola 2 4   6 Feb. 24 C. S. Webb Pierce Indianola   1   1 June 17 Atlanta Webb Warsaw Sound   16   16 1864               Feb.
r Col. Siegel, consisted of the Third and Fifth regiments Missouri Volunteers, one company of cavalry, under Capt. Carr, one company of Second Dragoons, under Lieut. Farrand, (First Infantry,) and one light battery of six pieces. This column was to march by a road on the left of the main Cassville Road, and leading to the supposeield where two hundred and fifty Home Guards, with two pieces of artillery, had been left to take care of the train. On reaching the Little York Road, we met Lieut. Farrand, with his company of dragoons, and a considerable portion of Col. Siegel's command, with one piece of artillery. At five o'clock P. M. we reached Springfieldth inst. I was ordered to report to Colonel Siegel at six o'clock with my company, (I, First Cavalry,) which I did. Company C, Second Dragoons, commanded by Lieutenant Farrand, First Infantry, also reported to Colonel Siegel, but was not under my command, being placed at the opposite extremity of the brigade. Colonel Siegel place
ng (Federal estimate). March 25, 1865: Petersburg trenches. Second and Sixth Corps; Confed., Gen. R. E. Lee's command. Losses: Union, 103 killed, 864 wounded, 209 missing; Confed., killed and wounded not recorded, 834 captured. March 26, 1865 to April 9, 1865: siege of Mobile, Ala., including Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. Union, Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps and Acting Rear-Admiral Thatcher's fleet; Confed., Gen. D. H. Maury's land forces, five gunboats under Commodore Farrand. Losses: Union, 213 killed, 1211 wounded; Confed., 500 killed and wounded, 3000 to 4000 captured. March 29, 1865: Quaker Road, Va. Union, Warren's Fifth Corps and Griffin's First Division, Army of the Potomac; Confed., Part of Gen. R. E. Lee's Army. Losses: Union, 55 killed, 306 wounded; Confed., 135 killed, 400 wounded, 100 missing. March 31, 1865: Boydton and White Oak roads, Va. Union, Second and Fifth Corps; Confed., part of Gen. R. E. Lee's com
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
Mobile bay, capturing Fort Morgan, etc., and the Federals held Pensacola, but had made no movement into the interior. The closing scenes. Major-General Maury commanded the Confederate forces garrisoning Mobile and adjacent works, with Commodore Farrand, Confederate Navy, in charge of several armed vessels. Small bodies of troops were stationed at different points through the department, and Major-General Forrest, with his division of cavalry, was in northeast Mississippi. Directing thisno room for hesitancy. Folly and madness combined would not have justified an attempt to prolong a hopeless contest. General Canby was informed that I desired to meet him for the purpose of negotiating a surrender of my forces, and that Commodore Farrand, commanding the armed vessels in the Alabama river, desired to meet Rear Admiral Thatcher for a similar purpose. Citronville, some forty miles north of Mobile, was the appointed place, and there in the early days of May, 1865, the great w
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