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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Farrand or search for Farrand in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Mobile bay, capturing Fort Morgan, etc., and the Federals held Pensacola, but had made no movement into the interior. The closing scenes. Major-General Maury commanded the Confederate forces garrisoning Mobile and adjacent works, with Commodore Farrand, Confederate Navy, in charge of several armed vessels. Small bodies of troops were stationed at different points through the Department, and Major-General Forrest, with his division of cavalry, was in Northeast Mississippi. Directing thre room for hesitancy. Folly and madness combined would not have justified an attempt to prolong a hopeless contest. General Canby was informed that I desired to meet him for the purpose of negotiating a surrender of my forces, and that Commodore Farrand, commanding the armed vessels in the Alabama river, desired to meet Rear Admiral Thatcher for a similar purpose. Citronville, some forty miles north of Mobile, was the appointed place, and there, in the early days of May, 1865, the great