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y constitute, with the Fourth, previously arrived, a brigade of 3,200 men, under the command of Gen. Theodore Runyon. His staff consists of Capt. J. B. Mulligan, Aid; BrigadeMajor, A. V. Bonnell; Private Secretary and Special aid, C. W. Tollis.--(Doc. 136.) The Arkansas Convention, by a vote of sixty-nine to one, passed an ordinance of secession from the Federal Union. The ordinance was unanimously ratified by the State.--New Orleans Picayune, May 7. The correspondence between Mr. Faulkner, late American Minister at Paris, and Secretary Seward, in relation to the recognition of the Southern Confederacy by the government of France, is published.--(Doc. 137.) The Washington Star of this morning, speaking of the intended attack on Washington by the secessionists, says, The scheme of the oligarchy was to have attacked this city sometime between daybreak of the 18th and day-break of the 21st of April ultimo. They had been led to believe that the Virginia ordinance of seces
August 12. Charles J. Faulkner, late U. S. Minister to France, was arrested in Washington by the Provost Marshal. The order for his arrest was issued from the War Department. A heavy detachment of infantry accompanied the Marshal to guard against any disturbance that the arrest might prompt. Mr. Faulkner acknowledged the Mr. Faulkner acknowledged the authority, and signified his readiness to accompany the officer. He was taken to the jail, where the other prisoners of war are confined. Mr. Faulkner occupies a lower floor of the jail, and has a ward adjoining that of Dr. Fleming, of Virginia, who is also a prisoner and a man of wealth and influence. When first arrested, he wMr. Faulkner occupies a lower floor of the jail, and has a ward adjoining that of Dr. Fleming, of Virginia, who is also a prisoner and a man of wealth and influence. When first arrested, he was somewhat excited, but he shortly recovered himself, and during the afternoon conversed freely with one of the officers on the condition of France. When asked how the rebellion was regarded there, he answered, France, sir, deeply regrets it. He also stated that he had his passes all ready, and intended to leave for his home in
, she was towed to Charleston by the U. S. steamer Augusta, Capt. Parrot, a prize crew put on board, and then sent to New York. About nine o'clock to-night a rebel band, called Moccasin rangers, entered and took possession of the town of Ripley, Jackson Co., Va. The inhabitants were defenceless, their arms having been locked up in the jail by a than who had been recruiting in the town for States army. The rangers, after robbing the town, decamped with their booty.--(Doc. 233.) C. J. Faulkner arrived at Richmond, Va., this evening. He was met at the depot by Governor Letcher, the mayor of the city, and a large concourse, with music, and escorted through a portion of the city, when the crowd increased to thousands. The ladies from the windows and crowded balconies saluted the procession with smiles and waving handkerchiefs, and cheers from the thronged sidewalks greeted the procession along the route to the City Hall. Mayor Mayo introduced Mr. Faulkner, when he made a speech
d. Upon searching the premises a six-pound cannon was found buried, together with six kegs of gunpowder, a quantity of rifles, bowie-knives, pistols, swords, and percussion caps. The arms, and other materials, were taken to Warsaw.--Louisville Journal. Alfred Ely, United States Representative from the Rochester district of New York, who was captured by a South Carolina company of infantry at the battle of Bull Run, arrived at Washington, D. C., having been released in exchange for C. J. Faulkner, former U. S. Minister to France.--(Doc. 239.) A correspondent of the Richmond Examiner, in a letter dated this lay, gives the following account of affairs at the rebel camp in the vicinity of Manassas, Va.: To-day our whole army is engaged in building log-houses for winter quarters, or in moving to sites already selected. Several brigades will remain where they now are, near the fortifications in Centreville, and the remainder will fall back a mile or two upon Bull Run. General
July 25. At St. Louis, Mo., great excitement existed on account of the order of Governor Gamble, authorizing the enrolment of the State militia.--An engagement took place on the Hatchie River, near Brownsville, Tenn., between a body of rebels, under the command of Capt. Faulkner, and a party of National cavalry, led by Major Wallace. Major-Gen. Pope, at Washington, issued the following order: Hereafter no guards will be placed over private houses or private property of any description whatever. Commanding officers are responsible for the conduct of the troops under their command, and the articles of war and regulations of the army provide ample means for restraining them to the full extent required for discipline and efficiency. Soldiers were called into the field to do battle against the enemy, and it is not expected that their force and energy shall be wasted in the protection of the private property of those most hostile to the government. No soldier serving in
ng parties in America the above plan as the simplest and most satisfactory method of reestablishing peace, and in their negotiations strongly recommend the abolition of slavery. The rebel expedition to New Mexico, under Colonel Sibley, was met near Fort Fillmore, by a body of California troops under the command of Colonel Canby. A battle ensued, in which the rebels were routed. Colonel Sibley was assassinated by his own men, who charged him with drunkenness and inefficiency. Captain Faulkner, with a body of rebel cavalry, encamped in a swamp near Trenton, Tenn., was surprised by a detachment of the Second Illinois cavalry, losing thirty killed and twenty wounded.--Col. McNeill with a force of one thousand National troops defeated the rebel guerrilla Porter at Kirksville, Mo.--A fight took place in the northern part of Dodd County, Mo., between a party of National troops, under the command of Major Montgomery, and Coffin's rebel guerrillas, in which the latter were defeated,
rth or West, except by the Potomac and the bay. Colonel Dunham, in command of the National garrison at Munfordsville, Ky., surrendered to the rebel forces under General Bragg.--(Doc. 121.) A fight took place this morning near Durhamville, Tenn., about twenty-five miles southeast of Fort Pillow, between a detachment of one hundred and fifty men, belonging to the Fifty-second regiment of Indiana volunters, under the command of Lieut. Ross Griffin, and a party of rebels under Lieut.-Col. Faulkner, which resulted in the complete rout of the rebels, with a loss of eight killed and twenty wounded. The National loss was one killed, one missing, and ten wounded.--Surgeon Martin's Report. Colonel George W. Berry, of the Harrison County home guards, left Covington, Ky., with six hundred of Colonel Tevis's cavalry, for the purpose of reconnoitring up the Kentucky Central Railroad as far as Falmouth. Before reaching Falmouth, the officer in command of the cavalry declined going a
Nationals a large quantity of commissary and quartermaster's stores. The Twenty-sixth New Jersey regiment, one thousand strong, left Newark, N. J., to-day, en route for the seat of war.--The Twenty-third regiment New Jersey volunteers, Col. Cox, one thousand strong, fully equipped, left Camp Cadwalader this morning, in steamers, for Washington. In the rebel House of Representatives majority and minority reports were submitted by the Committee on Foreign Affairs, to whom had been referred certain resolutions relating to the policy of the war, and which recommended to Jeff Davis the issuing of a proclamation offering the free navigation of the Mississippi River and its tributaries, and the opening of the market of the South to the inhabitants of the North-Western States, upon certain terms and conditions.--An unsuccessful attempt to capture the steamer Forest Queen was made at Ashport, Tenn., by a band of rebel guerrillas under Capt. Faulkner.--Louisville Journal, September 30.
ry, retured to Grand Junction, Miss., after a three days reconnaissance in the direction of Ripley and ten miles south. Ripley was captured and held twenty-four hours, as was also the town of Orizaba. Lieutenant-Colonel Hovis and the Surgeon of Faulkner's rebel rangers were captured, together with a captain, two lieutenants, and sixty men. Faulkner himself effected his escape, with the loss of four men.--The British schooner Path-finder was captured by the gunboat Penobscot, off Shallot Inlet, pley was captured and held twenty-four hours, as was also the town of Orizaba. Lieutenant-Colonel Hovis and the Surgeon of Faulkner's rebel rangers were captured, together with a captain, two lieutenants, and sixty men. Faulkner himself effected his escape, with the loss of four men.--The British schooner Path-finder was captured by the gunboat Penobscot, off Shallot Inlet, N. C.--The ship Levi Starbuck, in latitude 35°, 30′, longitude 66°, was captured and burned by the rebel privateer Alab
October 7. Colonel Harrison's force of West Tennessee cavalry were attacked at Como, Mississippi, by rebel guerrillas, under Colonels Faulkner and Wilson, and was forced to retreat after an engagement of two hours, with a loss of thirty-seven men. The rebel loss was large, Colonel Wilson being among the killed.--A fight took place at Farmington, Tenn., between the Union forces under General Crook and the rebels commanded by General Wharton.--(Docs. 181 and 191.) Acting volunteer Lieutenant James P. Couthouy, having received information that a rebel steamer was tied up to the bank on Red River, fitted out an expedition, under charge of Acting Chief-Engineer Thomas Doughty, with twenty men and Mr. Hobbs, who crossed over from the Mississippi to Red River, and after great labor in getting through the entanglements of the bushes and other undergrowth, got a sight of the steamer lying at the bank. They managed to get up to her and capture her. A few moments afterward they were
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