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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
d in Chalmers's English Poets; Massinger's Fatal Dowry; Marston's Antonio and Mellida, and What You Will; Sir Thomas Browne's Vulgar and Common Errors; Butler's Reminiscences; Southey's Book of the Church; Scott's Stories taken from Scottish History, and his Life of Swift; and Bulwer's Paul Clifford. He enjoyed at this time the old English writers, particularly the dramatists. He wrote in his commonplace-book brief sketches (drawing the material chiefly from the Retrospective Review) of Owen Feltham, John Marston, James Howell, Thomas Fuller, Sir John Suckling, and Robert South. The notice of the autobiography of Jerome Cardan, in the Retrospective Review, specially interested him. Some of the extracts from these authors reappear in his subsequent writings and speeches. One from Beaumont, copied March 16, 1830, was applied to the Mt. Auburn Cemetery, in his tribute to Judge Story. Works, Vol. I. p. 136. For other extracts from the old English writers in his addresses, see Vol.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
usetts, and third in descent from John Demesmaker, On first coming to this country, Johannes Demesmaker settled in Hingham, Massachusetts. Later he moved to Boston, where he became known as Dr. John Cutler; married Mary Cowell, of Boston, and served as surgeon in King Philip's War. before mentioned, sometime physician and surgeon. Our mother was much attached to Grandma Cutler, and speaks thus of her in a sketch entitled The Elegant literature of sixty years ago : Grandma will read Owen Feltham's Resolves, albeit the print is too small for her eyes. She knows Pope and Crabbe by heart, admires Shenstone, and tells me which scenes are considered finest in this or that of Scott's novels. Calling one day upon a compeer of her own age, she was scandalized to find her occupied with a silly story called Jimmy Jessamy. Mrs. Cutler had known General Washington, and was fond of telling how at a ball the Commander-in-Chief crossed the room to speak to her. Many of her letters have bee
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
rd told Julia of the anguish he suffered from this uncertainty. It is with No. 16 Bond Street that we chiefly associate the sprightly figure of Grandma Cutler, who was a frequent visitor there. The affection between Mr. Ward and his mother-in-law was warm and lively. They had a little language of their own, and she was Lady Feltham (from her fondness for Feltham's Resolves, a book little in demand in the twentieth century); and he was her saucy Lark, or Plato. Mrs. Cutler died in 1836. d told Julia of the anguish he suffered from this uncertainty. It is with No. 16 Bond Street that we chiefly associate the sprightly figure of Grandma Cutler, who was a frequent visitor there. The affection between Mr. Ward and his mother-in-law was warm and lively. They had a little language of their own, and she was Lady Feltham (from her fondness for Feltham's Resolves, a book little in demand in the twentieth century); and he was her saucy Lark, or Plato. Mrs. Cutler died in 1836.
rope, I, 138; II, 4, 12, 188, see also separate countries. Evangelides, Christy, I, 42, 272. Evans, Lawrence, II, 324. Evening Express, Newport, II, 54. Evening Post, N. Y., II, 156. Everett, Edward, I, 87, 168, 210, 211; II, 317. Fairchild, Sarah, II, 157. Faneuil Hall, II, 88, 190. Fano, I, 272, Farinata, I, 174. Farman, Mr., II, 36. Farrar, Canon, II, 252. Fast Day, abolition of, II, 193. Faucit, Helen, I, 87. Fellows, Sir, Charles, I, 85. Feltham, Owen, I, 13, 40. Felton, Cornelius, I, 74, 120; II, 44. Felton, Mrs., Cornelius, I, 124; II, 43, 228. Felu, Charles, I, 279, 280; II, 12, 173. Female Poets of America, I, 17, 131. Fenn, Mr., II, 181. Fenollosa, II, 169. Fern, Fanny, II, 48. Ferney, I, 22, 23. Ferrette, Bishop, I, 353. Fessenden, W. P., I, 239. Fichte, J. G., I, 196, 197, 250, 252, 253, 255-59, 263, 286, 287, 298. Field, Mrs. D. D., I, 134. Field, John, I, 227. Field, Kate, II, 48.