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osite side. The remainder of the rebels fired one volley and incontinently fled. Garnett turned on his heel to wave back his men, when Sergeant Burlingame, of Capt. Ferry's company, raised his musket, took deliberate aim, and fired. Garnett fell instantly on his back, his head lying towards our forces, and his mouth opening wideick as hail around him, many lodging in the sycamore stump on which he was standing. The Major at the same time saw Garnett, and pointing him out to a squad of Capt. Ferry's company, Sergeant Burlingame drew a deliberate sight on the General and fired. He was seen to throw up his hands and fall back on the sand. At the same instth Indiana, leading the advance, reached the bank in pursuit among the first, and, discovering a point from which fire could be effectively delivered, called up Capt. Ferry's company of his regiment, and ordered them to fire. Garnett stood near the river bank, and fell, shot through the heart. A Georgia boy was the only one who f
e the battle was thickest, there it should wave; that it should never trail dishonored in the mire; that rather would he spill his life's blood in its defence, and, dying, wrap his body in its gorgeous folds. When that unmannerly cannon-ball from the Cleveland artillery on the hill came crashing through the camp, this heroic captain forgot all about the flag he had so gallantly received the night before, and led the column — out of danger, as fast as their legs could carry them! When Captain Ferry of the Indiana Volunteers brought in the flags, this one had evidently been trampled in the mud, and the marks of dirty boots were still on it. Some of the troops, particularly the Virginians, who were outraged at what they considered the murder of their brave Col. Kelly, in the first flush of victory committed some depredations on the inhabitants. The colonel commanding has taken prompt measures to redress such grievances, and for a day or two a Court of Inquiry has been sitting on
did not respond, nor did I see any thing of their boats. I have since been informed, through the General, that the boats of the enemy were completely disabled, and the panic became so great at the Iron Banks that the gunners deserted their guns. The fire of the St. Louis was precise, and the shot told well. The officers and men of this vessel behaved with firmness, Mr. Riley, the first Master, carrying out all my orders strictly, while the officers of the gun divisions, Messrs. Loving and Ferry, paid particular attention to the pointing of their respective guns. Mr. Britton, my Aid, paid all attention to my orders, and conveyed them correctly and with alacrity; in fact, all the officers and men on board behaved like veterans. Your obedient servant, W. D Porter, Commander. Flag-Officer Foote, in forwarding this report, says: Cairo, Jan. 13, 182. sir: I forward a report from Commander Porter. The rebel gunboat shells all fell short of our boats, while our shells rea
ke and Cronin. Upon passing their camp the Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, under Colonel Spear, fell into column, having two howitzers along. Our own howitzer battery, under Lieutenant Thomas Fairgraves, formerly Adjutant of the First Fire Zouaves, also was in position in our own regiment. As we moved on we discovered infantry regiments in motion, and soon learned that the cavalry force under command of Colonel Dodge was to be supported by a full infantry brigade, under command of Brigadier-General Ferry, commanding the reconnoissance, and two regiments of Acting Brigadier-General Foster's brigade; also, a Captain Howard's battery of United States artillery, acting Brigadier-General Foster, second in command of the expedition. The column now moved steadily on, the New-York Mounted Rifles leading, taking the most direct road for Windsor, on the Norfolk and Petersburgh Railroad, which place we passed at or about ten or eleven o'clock at night, securing guides as we passed on. Col.
fight at Zuni, Va. Suffolk, Va., December 13, 1862. On Thursday noon last, a column under the command of Brigadier-General Ferry, left here for the purpose of engaging the attention of the enemy at the Blackwater. The column consisted of cawim over to the opposite side in the face of a prepared enemy. But for these difficulties a plan, first suggested by Gen. Ferry, and afterward ordered by General Peck, must have succeeded admirably. It was this: to mount two or three companies ofry and artillery, who were assembling at that point in large numbers, evidently with the intention of outflanking us. General Ferry at once ordered his Adjutant-General, Capt. Ives, with a regiment of infantry and a section of artillery, to this poie expedition was partially a diversion in flavor of other and more important military movements by our forces, and as General Ferry had received orders to be particularly cautious not to bring on an engagement, our men were recalled from the opposit
had a small mounted scouting party on a hazardous expedition, and performed it in a very satisfactory manner. David W. Cheek, Commissary and Quartermaster's Clerk, at my instance, mounted a horse, and rode at my side, bore messages and rendered me very valuable services, and proved himself brave and courageous. The colors presented by the ladies of Aurora to the Seventh Indiana regiment, were the Stars and Stripes which first floated over the town. The disunion flag was captured by Captain Ferry's command, of my regiment, and the Stars and Stripes were run up and given to the breeze in its place. Captain William C. Moreau, of Colonel Crittenden's command, has rendered me very valuable assistance in a business point of view, since I took command of this post; and I hear his conduct in the recent engagement spoken of in terms of praise both by his officers and men. I recommend Corporal Charles Bryant and Sergeant John Griffin of Company G, Seventh Indiana, for good conduct.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
ber 13, thence ordered to Williamsport, Md., October 29, 1861. Attached to R. R. Guard, Dept. of West Virginia, to January, 1862. 1st Brigade, Lander's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' 2nd Division, Banks' 5th Army Corps, to April, 1862, and Department of the Shenandoah to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to July, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. Ferry's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to December, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to April, 1863. U. S. Forces, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, June, 1863. 1st Brigade, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 1st
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
nuary, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Landers' Division, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' 2nd Division, Banks' 5th Army Corps and Dept. of the Shenandoah to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to July, 1862. Ferry's 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. to September, 1862. Ferry's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, September, 1862. Foster's Provisional Brigade, Division at Suffolk, 7th ArmFerry's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, September, 1862. Foster's Provisional Brigade, Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to April, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, Vogdes' Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to January. 1864. 1st Brigade, Vogdes Division, Folly Island, S. C., Northern District. Dept. of the South, to February, 1864. 1st Brigade, Vogdes' Division, District of Florida, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to May, 1864.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
uring service 1 Officer and 34 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 141 Enlisted men by disease. Total 178. 26th Michigan Regiment Infantry. Organized at Jackson, Michigan, September 10 to December 12, 1862. Mustered in December 12, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., December 13. Attached to District of Alexandria, Defenses of Washington, D. C., to February, 1863. Slough's Brigade, Garrison of Alexandria, Va., 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1863. Ferry's 1st Brigade, Corcoran's 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. New York, Dept. of the East, to October, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1865. Service. Provost duty at Alexandria, Va., till April 20, 1863. Ordered to Suffolk, Va., April 20. Siege of Suffolk, Va., April 22-May 4. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. Windsor May 23. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 8. Expedition to Bottom's Br
ds' Division, Banks' 5th Army Corps, and Dept. of the Shenandoah, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to July, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. Ferry's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, 1862. 1st Brigade, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to July, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. Ferry's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, Department of North Carolina, to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of the
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