Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Ferry or search for Ferry in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 55: Fessenden's death.—the public debt.—reduction of postage.— Mrs. Lincoln's pension.—end of reconstruction.—race discriminations in naturalization.—the Chinese.—the senator's record.—the Cuban Civil War.—annexation of San Domingo.—the treaties.—their use of the navy.—interview with the presedent.—opposition to the annexation; its defeat.—Mr. Fish.—removal of Motley.—lecture on Franco-Prussian War.—1869-1870. (search)
conservative patriotism of the city kept aloof from the affair. One of the incidents of the San Domingo controversy was the investigation by the Senate of the imprisonment by the Baez government of Davis Hatch of Connecticut, described by Senator Ferry from that State to be as high-toned and honorable a gentleman as any in the Senate. The charge against him was that he was a partisan of Cabral; but the real purpose of his illegal confinement was to prevent his coming to the United States, was likely to exert influence against the annexation. Babcock, who was the chief support of Baez's power, and two speculators who were co-operating with him (W. L. Cazneau and Fabens), were charged with being privy to the illegal detention. Senator Ferry brought Hatch's petition to the attention of the Senate June 8, and remarked of Babcock that such a person no longer deserved to be an officer of the United States. Sumner at once said, from his seat, He ought to be cashiered at once! Th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 59: cordiality of senators.—last appeal for the Civil-rights bill. —death of Agassiz.—guest of the New England Society in New York.—the nomination of Caleb Cushing as chief-justice.—an appointment for the Boston custom-house.— the rescinding of the legislative censure.—last effort in debate.—last day in the senate.—illness, death, funeral, and memorial tributes.—Dec. 1, 1873March 11, 1874. (search)
letters he had received upbraiding his action upon it. he expressed his gratification at the recent action of the Massachusetts Legislature, and at the kindness that had cheered him on his last visit to the State. Taking a seat next to that of Mr. Ferry, senator from Connecticut, he mentioned to him symptoms of his malady which he had experienced during Sunday and Monday nights, and compared his own case with that of Mr. Ferry, who had suffered from a spinal affection,—complaining also of seveMr. Ferry, who had suffered from a spinal affection,—complaining also of severe pain while they were conversing. He expressed to Mr. Schurz the fear that he should not be able to support him by a speech on finance as he had hoped. He conversed at his seat with Mr. Spofford, the librarian, who came to consult him on the authorship of Hargrave's Argument in the Case of James Somersett, a Negro, etc.,—a book with which he had been long familiar. He talked with Mr. Spofford about the title of his Prophetic Voices concerning America. saving that Longfellow preferred t<